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Comment: Re:HQ printer with archival inks on acid free pape (Score 1) 499

by EddydaSquige (#37566642) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Long-Term Video/Picture Storage?
If you're not making money off it, a 3000 series epson is a better buy (and much smaller foot print). 4900 will last longer and be cheaper to operate in the long term, but you're looking at $3000-4000 in start up costs (at retail). You'd have to make a lot of prints, way more than 100's, to justify it. 3000 series can be had for $1500-2000 in start up costs.

Comment: Re:What if we could see the originals? (Score 1) 512

by EddydaSquige (#29508669) Attached to: French Deputies Moving Against Photoshopped Ads
Food shots are retouched. But (at least here in the US) there are truth in advertising laws. So if you see a shot of a McDonalds hamburger, it made from the same ingredients and materials that you would get at the restaurant. The difference is that what you get at McD's has been slapped together by a line worker, while the photo-ed one was assembled by a food stylist who took their time and made it look edible (or as edible as a McDonalds burger can look).

Comment: Re:Ethics of photomanipulation (Score 1) 512

by EddydaSquige (#29505555) Attached to: French Deputies Moving Against Photoshopped Ads
Photojournalism and commercial photography are two completely different beasts. Without getting into any theoretical arguments about what is photographic truth, photojournalism tries to convey the facts of an event where as commercial photography want to convey an idea. Reality and truth don't matter. After over a decade in this business, more and more I think of it as image making through photographic processes. And for the record every, and I mean EVERY photo you see in an ad, editorial spread, billboard etc... has been manipulated. This has been true since the dawn of photography. Even Ansel Adams would quite literally move boulders to get the shot he wanted. How is manipulating the scene before hand any different than doing it after.
Software

BitTorrent For Enterprise File Distribution? 291

Posted by Soulskill
from the make-it-so dept.
HotTuna writes "I'm responsible for a closed, private network of retail stores connected to our corporate office (and to each other) with IPsec over DSL, and no access to the public internet. We have about 4GB of disaster recovery files that need to be replicated at each site, and updated monthly. The challenge is that all the enterprise file replication tools out there seem to be client/server and not peer-to-peer. This crushes our bandwidth at the corporate office and leaves hundreds of 7Mb DSL connections (at the stores) virtually idle. I am dreaming of a tool which can 'seed' different parts of a file to different peers, and then have those peers exchange those parts, rapidly replicating the file across the entire network. Sounds like BitTorrent you say? Sure, except I would need to 'push' the files out, and not rely on users to click a torrent file at each site. I could imagine a homebrew tracker, with uTorrent and an RSS feed at each site, but that sounds a little too patchwork to fly by the CIO. What do you think? Is BitTorrent an appropriate protocol for file distribution in the business sector? If not, why not? If so, how would you implement it?"
Television

+ - Comcast disables Tivo Serial Port channel changing->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Across New England, updates have apparently been rolled out to Comcast's Motorola cable boxes that disable the serial port so that Tivo can no longer change channels. My dual-tuner Tivo can still access non-digital channels, but I have to use the cable remote to access HBO and the like. If you're a Comcast user with a Tivo, please let Comcast know you're displeased with this behavior — although they may be working with Motorola to back-out the change. New cable boxes with functioning serial ports will have the serial port disabled after automatically downloading this update. Asking tech support for a "Factory Default Reset" might help for some boxes. Comcast claims to have been unaware of the update and blames Motorola for pushing it out — begging the question of why a service provider would allow a hardware vendor to make changes to their customers' devices without so much as a heads-up?"
Link to Original Source
Education

+ - Why are blue feathers blue? [pics]->

Submitted by
grrlscientist
grrlscientist writes "How birds grow colored plumages, especially violet, blue and white.

From the story: Because blue light have very short wavelengths, it is reflected more easily than other colors of light with longer wavelengths. This was first understood in 1869, when scientist John Tyndall noted that miniscule particles in earth's atmosphere preferentially scattered blue light resulting in the familiar "sky blue" of a clear summer day. Shortly afterward, Rayleigh demonstrated that Tyndall's "fine particles" are actually gas molecules in Earth's atmosphere, specifically, nitrogen and oxygen. Tyndall's contribution is widely recognized by describing this phenomenon as "Tyndall scattering" and referring to structural blue colors as "Tyndall Blues.""

Link to Original Source
The Internet

+ - How to Take Down the Power Grid

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Ira Winkler, a security expert, writes about how hacking into the control systems set up by utility companies is frighteningly easy on the recently launched Website Internet Evolution. In his article he describes how he broke into a power company's internal network through a vulnerability on its Website, and proceeded to gain access to everything on its internal network, from the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition system that controls the grid, to the personnel records of the CIO and CEO. Winkler's suggested solution to the problem is legislation from Congress forcing power companies to enforce more rigid security. However, he says he's not holding his breath for such laws to be passed. "Congress is impotent, as the power grid remains incredibly vulnerable, and people need to be outraged," he says. Is Winkler really right about how laughably easy it is to hack to grid? Should we be worried?"
Portables (Apple)

Puncturing the "PCs Are Cheaper Than Macs" Myth 823

Posted by kdawson
from the used-to-be-true dept.
jcatcw writes "The recently converted Scot Finnie went notebook shopping. At the high end of the notebook spectrum, in order to get comparable power and features, a Dell machine comes in $650 over the Apple, and it was clunkier and weighed more. Sony couldn't beat the Apple either. Midrange and low-end machines, though, turn out to be pretty comparable, with more choices in the PC arena but some good values if you happen to want what Apple has decided you need. So, if you're talking name-brand hardware, it's just no longer the case that PCs are cheaper than Macs."

Microsoft Pushing Municipal Wi-Fi 67

Posted by Zonk
from the something-in-the-air dept.
PreacherTom writes "Microsoft is moving to be the latest player to bring its formidable weight to bear in the growing Wi-Fi market. The software giant's recent deal to provide content and services through partnership with municipal Wi-Fi operator MetroFi in Portland, Ore., will intensify the battle between Google, Yahoo!, and MSN for online traffic. Why the focus? Content providers who capture the growing municipal Wi-Fi market will be in a better position to enjoy higher traffic to their sites and greater customer loyalty — and, as a result, grab a greater share of the $16 billion of expected online advertising dollars this year, according to consultancy eMarketer. 'It's a battle for eyeballs,' says Matt Rosoff, an analyst with the consultancy firm 'Directions on Microsoft'."

Immaturity Level Rising in Adults 862

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the is-not-are-too dept.
Ant writes to tell us that a Discovery News article is exploring the old adage, "like a kid at heart", which may be closer to the truth than we would like to admit. New research is showing that grown-ups are more immature than ever. From the article: "Specifically, it seems a growing number of people are retaining the behaviors and attitudes associated with youth. As a consequence, many older people simply never achieve mental adulthood, according to a leading expert on evolutionary psychiatry."

"Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit!" -- Looney Tunes, "What's Opera Doc?" (1957, Chuck Jones)

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