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Comment: Unfortunately (Score 2) 69

This sounds great, but unfortunately from TFA:

"Demonstration of a mini organ model lighting a bulb might be feasible in five years. But developing the technology for transplantation, hooking that up to the blood stream, connecting and synchronizing it with a heart with failed AV node will take much longer." Long enough that we probably wonâ(TM)t be enjoying superhuman organs in our lifetimes. Bioprinted "self-powered humanâ parts that generate electricity are at least 100 years off, Ozbolat said.

Biotech

3D Bioprinters Could Make Enhanced, Electricity-Generating 'Superorgans' 69

Posted by timothy
from the finally-some-competition dept.
New submitter meghan elizabeth (3689911) writes Why stop at just mimicking biology when you can biomanufacture technologically improved humans? 3D-printed enhanced "superorgans"—or artificial ones that don't exist in nature—could be engineered to perform specific functions beyond what exists in nature, like treating disease. Already, a bioprinted artificial pancreas that can regulate glucose levels in diabetes patients is being developed. Bioprinting could also be used to create an enhanced organ that can generate electricity to power electronic implants, like pacemakers.
Transportation

FTC Approves Tesla's Direct Sales Model 328

Posted by samzenpus
from the sell-how-you-want dept.
cartechboy (2660665) writes "We've all read about Tesla and the ongoing battles its having with different dealer associations. Basically, dealer associations aren't too pleased about the Silicon Valley startup's direct sales model. Today the FTC has had made a statement on the matter and it's actually in favor of Tesla's direct sales model. 'In this case and others, many state and local regulators have eliminated the direct purchasing option for consumers, by taking steps to protect existing middlemen from new competition. We believe this is bad policy for a number of reasons,' wrote Andy Gavil, Debbie Feinstein, and Marty Gaynor in the FTC's 'Who decides how consumers should shop?' posting to the Competition Matters blog. The FTC appears to take issue not with those laws, but with how they're being used, and with the direct-sales bans being passed in several states. Now the only real question is how long will it be before Tesla prevails in all states?"
Earth

Climate Scientist: Climate Engineering Might Be the Answer To Warming 343

Posted by samzenpus
from the warm-up-the-cloud-gun dept.
Lasrick (2629253) writes "Tom Wigley is one of the world's top climate scientists, and in this interview he explains his outspoken support for both nuclear energy and research into climate engineering. Wigley was one of the first scientists to break the taboo on public discussion of climate engineering as a possible response to global warming; in a 2006 paper in the journal Science, he proposed a combined geoengineering-mitigation strategy that would address the problem of increasing ocean acidity, as well as the problem of climate change. In this interview, he argues that renewable energy alone will not be sufficient to address the climate challenge, because it cannot be scaled up quickly and cheaply enough, and that opposition to nuclear power 'threatens humanity's ability to avoid dangerous climate change.'"

Comment: Surely (Score 3, Insightful) 313

by Eddi3 (#46717381) Attached to: Double Take: Condoleezza Rice As Dropbox's Newest Board Member
If Brendan Eich could be forced out for a $1,000 donation, surely Ms. Rice can be for influencing privacy policy herself, something which is highly relevant to this business. In addition, she has defended her position since leaving office. I think the real question here is where does this end?

Comment: Re:Who says computers will take over.... (Score 4, Insightful) 275

by Eddi3 (#46589231) Attached to: TSA Missed Boston Bomber Because His Name Was Misspelled In a Database
I'm not at all disputing the idea of what you're saying. In fact, I agree that incompetence let this guy through.

However, your example of googling this guy's name is a particularly bad one. Google's autocorrection algorithms are based on the popularity of terms and their similarities. Since the bombing, surely this name would have been googled millions of times.

Do you really suppose that Google would have made such an accurate correction before the Boston attacks that madetheir family name infamous?
Technology

Jesse Jackson To Take On Silicon Valley's Lack of Diversity 397

Posted by Soulskill
from the equality-in-industry dept.
New submitter wyattstorch516 writes "San Jose Mecury News reports that Jesse Jackson will lead a delegation to HP's next board meeting to discuss the hiring of technology companies in regard to African-Americans and Latinos. 'About one in 14 tech workers is black or Latino both in the Silicon Valley and nationally. Blacks and Hispanics make up 13.1 and 16.9 percent of the U.S. population, respectively, according to the most recent Census data.' Jackson sent a letter to HP, Apple, Google, Twitter, Facebook, and others about meeting to discuss diversity issues."

Comment: Re:I was shopping for one recently (Score 1) 444

by Eddi3 (#46031521) Attached to: Who Makes the Best Hard Disk Drives?
This right here, so fucking hard. Newegg's packaging is universally shit, and is probably a reason they are usually cheaper than everybody. That said, I have had too many items to count shipped to me from them over the years, among that 10 or so hard drives, and dare I say not a single item from them has ever failed despite the horrendous shipping. The hard drives were almost entirely Seagate. The thing with them is that there are models that have extremely high failure rates, and they are usually the ones that are discounted. When buying a drive, regardless of brand, you've gotta do some research on individual models/firmwares and failure rates for them. Off hand, I remember Seagate's 7200.10 line had a huge failure rate, up near 20-30% however their 7200.11 line which came after was solid. I still have several drives from that line going strong. I strongly believe that most, if not the vast majority, of the drive failures have to do with very poor shipping methods. I've sold 20-30+ used hard drives on eBay, and I've never once had a customer complain that it didn't work once it got there.
It's funny.  Laugh.

King James Programming 184

Posted by Soulskill
from the though-i-walk-through-the-valley-of-the-shadow-of-regular-expressions dept.
Jah-Wren Ryel writes "What do you get when you train a Markov chain on the King James Bible and a copy of Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs? King James Programming — a tumblr of auto-generated pseudo-scripture (or pseudo-compsci lessons). Some examples: -- 'The LORD is the beginning (or prefix) of the code for the body of the procedure.' -- 'More precisely, if P and Q are polynomials, let O1 be the order of blessed.' -- ''In APL all data are represented as arrays, and there shall they see the Son of man, in whose sight I brought them out.'"

This universe shipped by weight, not by volume. Some expansion of the contents may have occurred during shipment.

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