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+ - Nearly one-third of Americans aren't ready for the next generation of technology->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Thanks to a decade of programs geared toward giving people access to the necessary technology, by 2013 some 85% of Americans were surfing the World Wide Web. But how effectively are they using it? A new survey suggests that the digital divide has been replaced by a gap in digital readiness. It found that nearly 30% of Americans either aren’t digitally literate or don’t trust the Internet. That subgroup tended to be less educated, poorer, and older than the average American."
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+ - India launches five foreign satellites->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "India has put into orbit five foreign satellites, including one built by France two from Canada and one each from Singapore and Germany. The PSLV (Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle) has so far successfully launched 67 satellites, including 40 foreign ones, into space. The PSLV costs about Rs. 100 crore (20 Million USD) and the cost is seen as a major advantage India has over other countries in terms of commercial launches. When talking about the cost of the project, the Prime Minister of India noted that the India’s Mars mission cost less than movie Gravity."
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+ - PayPal freezes account of email encryption startup ProtonMail 1

Submitted by blottsie
blottsie (3618811) writes "PayPal has frozen more than $275,000 in donations to ProtonMail, claiming the email encryption startup may be illegal. A PayPal alert told ProtonMail that was unsure if ProtonMail has the necessary U.S. government approval to encrypt emails, as though anyone who encrypts needs a license to do so. Of course, it is absolutely legal to encrypt email. The freeze remains in place."

+ - Are the hard-to-exploit bugs in LZO compression algorithm a hype?

Submitted by NotInHere
NotInHere (3654617) writes "In 1996, Markus F. X. J. Oberhumer wrote an implementation of the Lempel–Ziv compression, which is used in various places like the linux kernel, libav, openVPN, or the Curiosity rover. As security researchers have found out, the code contained integer overflow and buffer overrun vulnerabilities, in the part of the code that was responsible to process not compressed parts of the data. Those vulnerabilities are however very hard to exploit, and their scope is dependent on the actual implementation.
According to Oberhumer, the problem only affects 32 bit systems. "I personally do not know about any client program that actually is affected", Oberhumer sais, calling the news about the possible security issue a media hype."

+ - YouTube introduces 60fps video with Battlefield Hardline trailer->

Submitted by mpicpp
mpicpp (3454017) writes "Google has renovated its YouTube service by allowing the video player to display 60fps footage for the first time.

The move means that users can soon upload videos of games that render in 60fps and watch a 'true' representation on YouTube. Previously, the Google-owned web video service could only render in 30fps.

Marking the occasion was a new trailer for Hardline Battlefield, in development at EA's Visceral Games, displayed in its native frame rate

The option to upload in 60fps is unavailable for now, though Google said the service would arrive shortly.

"Your video game footage with crazy high frame rates will soon look as awesome on YouTube as it does when you're playing, when we launch support for 48 and even 60 frames per second in the coming months," the corporation said. More info on additional improvements, such as new crowdfunding tools, was published on the YouTube blog."

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+ - You're Paying Comcast's Electric Bill-> 3

Submitted by agizis
agizis (676060) writes "We know Comcast is rolling out a new WiFi network that they're installing in customer’s homes, but most articles glossed over the routers' power usage. So using a Kill-A-Watt power meter, I actually measured and Comcast is saving tens of millions per year on the backs of their customers. Sign my change.org petition asking Comcast to compensate its customers."
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+ - $500k "Energy-Harvesting" Kickstarter scam unfolding right now.->

Submitted by FryingLizard
FryingLizard (512858) writes "For a while I've been following the saga of the Kickstarter "iFind" Bluetooth 4.0 tracking tag. Nothing new about such tags (there are many crowdfunded examples; some have delivered, some have disappointed), but this one claims it doesn't require any batteries — it harvests its energy from electromagnetic emissions (wifi, cell towers, TV signals, etc). The creators have posted no evidence other than some slick photoshop work, an obviously faked video, and some easily disproven data and classic bad science.
So far they've picked up half a million in pledges. With six days to go until they walk off with the money, skeptics abound (10min in) including some excellent dissections of their claims. The creators have yet to post even a single photo of the magical device, instead posting empty platitudes and claims that such secrecy is necessary to protect their IP.

Using just their published figures, their claims are readily refuted, yet still backers flock in. Kickstarter appear uninterested in what can only be described as a slow-motion bank robbery, despite their basic requirement to demonstrate a prototype.
It seems self-evident that such scams should not be allowed to propagate on Kickstarter, for the good of other genuine projects and the community at large.
Skeptics are maintaining a google doc with many of the highlights of the action.

Bring your own popcorn and enjoy the show."

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+ - Thought crime is terror in U.S.->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "The Justice Department is resurrecting a program designed to thwart domestic threats to the United States, and Attorney General Eric Holder says those threats include individuals the government deems anti-government or racially prejudiced.

The Domestic Terrorism Executive Committee was created in the wake of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing but was scrapped soon after the 2001 terrorist attacks as intelligence and law enforcement officials shifted their focus to threats from outside the country. The committee will be comprised of figures from the FBI, the National Security Division of the Justice Department and the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee.

In his statement announcing the return of the committee, Holder said he remains concerned about the specter of attacks prompted by Islamic extremists, but he said this committee will be tasked with identifying other threats.

“We must also concern ourselves with the continued danger we face from individuals within our own borders who may be motivated by a variety of other causes from anti-government animus to racial prejudice,” Holder said. According to reporting from Reuters, the ACLU is pushing back against the DOJ plan, fearing “it could be a sweeping mandate to monitor and collect controversial speech.”"

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+ - Polar Bear number just made up to meet public demand->

Submitted by bricko
bricko (1052210) writes "Researchers with the IUCN Polar Bear Specialist Group (PBSG) recently admitted to experienced zoologist and polar bear specialist Susan Crockford that the estimate given for the total number of polar bars in the Arctic was “simply a qualified guess given to satisfy public demand.”

http://polarbearscience.com/20..."

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+ - SPAM: Latest News Abney Associates Technology, US police force pay bitcoin ransom

Submitted by dietrichschmitt
dietrichschmitt (3444171) writes "US police force pay bitcoin ransom in Cryptolocker malware scam

Massachusetts police have admitted to paying a bitcoin ransom after being infected by the Crypt locker ransomware.

The Cryptolocker malware infects a computer, normally via a legitimate-looking email that urges the reader to open an attachment often posing as a voicemail, fax, invoice or details of a suspicious transaction that is being queried.

Once the Windows computer is infected, the malware encrypts the user's hard drive and then begins displaying a countdown timer, while demanding payment for the release of the data of 2 bitcoins – an almost untraceable, peer-to-peer digital online currency – which at current exchange rates equates to about £832 or $1338.

“(The virus) is so complicated and successful that you have to buy these bitcoins, which we had never heard of,” Swansea Police Lt. Gregory Ryan talking to the Herald News. “It was an education for (those who) had to deal with it.”

Essential operational computers were not affected

Ryan insisted that the Massachusetts police systems were now clear of infection, and that essential operational computers were not affected, nor was there any data stolen.

The FBI is currently investigating the virus infection of the police computer, which is thought to have evolved over the last year and originated from somewhere within former Soviet nations such as Ukraine and Russia."

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+ - Science Museum Declines to Show Climate Change Film->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A premier science museum in North Carolina has sparked controversy by refusing to show an hourlong film about climate change and rising sea levels. The museum may be in a bit of a delicate position. It is part of a state agency, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The state government has been perceived as hostile to action on climate change; last year, the legislature passed a bill forbidding the state coastal commission from defining rates of sea-level rise for regulation before 2016."
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+ - Salesforce.com To Review Controversial Hackathon Win->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "Adding to the growing sentiment that prizes ruin hackathons, Salesforce.com has come under fire from critics who say the hackathon the company held at its Dreamforce conference was judged unfairly. Not long after the $1 million prize was handed to Upshot for a mobile app that let users to create and edit Salesforce.com reports, other contestants raised allegations of unfairness. Among the complaints: That Upshot's CTO Thomas Kim had demoed a similar-sounding application a couple of weeks before Oct. 25 cutoff; that Kim is a former Salesforce.com employee (although that isn't in violation of the rules); and that their own entries weren't evaluated by judges at all. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff is now promising a thorough investigation of the hackathon."
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+ - Driver Arrested in Ohio for Secret Car Compartment Full of Nothing->

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "Norman Gurley, 30, is facing drug-related charges in Lorain County, Ohio, despite the fact that state troopers did not actually find any drugs in his possession.

Ohio passed a law in 2012 making it a felony to alter a vehicle to add a secret compartment with the “intent” of using it to conceal drugs for trafficking."

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+ - Failed software upgrade halts transit service

Submitted by linuxwrangler
linuxwrangler (582055) writes "San Francisco Bay Area commuters awoke this morning to the news that BART, the major regional transit system which carries hundreds of thousands of daily riders, was entirely shut down due to a computer failure. Commuters stood stranded at stations and traffic backed up as residents took to the roads. The system has returned to service and BART says the outage resulted from a botched software upgrade."

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