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Comment Re:What's the big deal? (Score 2) 389

Apple is trying to protect themselves from becoming a helpdesk, which is something they are not. They are very clear about this

Yes, the giant "We're here to help" headline on top of the Apple retail home page really slams that point home. http://www.apple.com/retail/

"We’re here to help.... Geniuses provide hands-on technical support... Our Specialists help you get to know our products and answer your questions...."

"If you have technical questions about your Mac, iPad, iPod, Apple TV, or iPhone, the Genius Bar is the place for free advice, insight, and friendly, hands-on technical support. Geniuses use their impressive knowledge to answer technical questions, troubleshoot problems, and perform repairs — right in your neighborhood store.... If you have technical questions about your Mac, iPad, iPod, Apple TV, or iPhone, the Genius Bar is the place for free advice, insight, and friendly, hands-on technical support. Geniuses use their impressive knowledge to answer technical questions, troubleshoot problems, and perform repairs — right in your neighborhood store."

They're a help desk. Otherwise, the claim above is fraud.

Comment Re:Give me a break (Score 2) 212

WiFi APs are good enough to map your location on a map on wifi only iPads (labeled "current location"). Their range is very limited, so coming into contact with one is the same as knowing location -- especially when combined with what other APs are visible to you at the same time -- which is why Apple has always referred to this as a "location" finding technique.

Comment By "keeps the doctor away" you mean "kills you." (Score 1) 470

From TFA:

The sample of those who were studied included individuals between ages 55 and 65 who had had any kind of outpatient care in the previous three years. The 1,824 participants were followed for 20 years. [...] Just over 69% of the never-drinkers died during the 20 years, 60% of the heavy drinkers died and only 41% of moderate drinkers died.

So the delta between moderate and heavy (i.e. "three drinks a day") is a full 19 percentage points, meaning almost 50 percent more heavy drinkers than moderate drinkers were dead by the end of the test. Yes, there could be various other factors exaggerating the impact, i.e. sick people drinking away the pain, but the researchers were very clear about the overall outcome:

Moderate drinkers lived the longest, and heavy drinkers did well relative to abstainers. But let's not forget how many of them were dead at the end of the study. If you want to keep the doctor away, exercise and eating well, and apparently some moderate alcohol intake, is the best past, not three drinks a day. Just in case anyone is making health decisions based on Slashdot headlines (in which case, God help you :)

Education

Submission + - Magazine loses files when backup fails

DysenteryInTheRanks writes: Business 2.0, the Time Inc.-owned tech/business magazine that publishes the "101 Dumbest Moments in Business" each year, lost much of the content from its June issue when a server crashed — and the never-tested "backup server" also failed, apparently due to a software issue. There was only one week left before the monthly magazine was to be published. Luckily the text of the articles had been emailed to lawyers and was recovered. Everything had to be laid out again and the graphics recreated. Editors have since followed the advice they once published in their own magazine and begun using an off-site backup server that mirrors every half hour.

Neckties strangle clear thinking. -- Lin Yutang

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