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Comment: Re:since you asked... (Score 1) 965

by Dynetrekk (#43173193) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Mac To Linux Return Flow?
A few comments: On the mac you can program in any keyboard shortcut yourself, i.e. give any menu item any keyboard shortcut. Very flexible. The "omg no second mouse button" hasn't been true for longer than I've been using a mac (2006 IIRC). The cygwin tools perform not too well and don't integrate well with other shell tools and programming environments, such as python. If I'm wrong - please, tell me how to fix it! By all means - kudos to the cygwin team, but they're in for a big challenge with all the underlying windows issues. Symbolic links, anyone? And the memory issue, that's not something I recognize at all - that must be an issue with the software in question, not with Mac OS? (I'd say the same if you were having memory issues on windows.) I tend to run at least twice as many apps simultaneously on my mac than on my windows machine, but then, RAM is plentiful anyway, so I find the GUI on windows more limiting. Finally, SSH is vastly better than both VNC and remote desktop, but I suppose that depends on what you're up to. If only windows could support a decent shell and SSH, it'd be a lot more livable when you're talking to a *nix server.

Comment: Re:since you asked... (Score 1) 965

by Dynetrekk (#43168477) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Mac To Linux Return Flow?
This, exactly this. Parent and grandparent are spot on. I've been away from windows since 2007, and got reintroduced to Win 7 when I started working in a new company a few months back. Windows 7 is the best windows so far - but windows still is the worst operating system out there, by FAR. I've got nothing nice to say about it, regarding either ease of use, convenience or anything such. Folders and directories are mixed in ways unimaginable for a linux user. The graphics are more Fischer-Price than ever, eating ever more of your precious screen real estate. The list goes on, and on, and on. I won't choose Windows on a machine if I can at all help it.

Comment: Re:just use virtual machines (Score 1) 464

by Dynetrekk (#42892987) Attached to: Retail Copies of Office 2013 Are Tied To a Single Computer Forever

I've only used VMs on beefy servers, never on consumer desktop or laptop hardware. Is there a performance reason you wouldn't live in the VM full time? The top level OS could be light; the only thing it is doing is handling the VM (and passing off messages between the VM and outside world? I don't know where VMs live on your OSI model.).

I use Ubuntu (to ensure same versions of stuff as Ubuntu servers we have) in a VM (Virtualbox, simple setup, open source, and highly recommended) at work. The VM is way faster than the Windows 7 host, as I've put the virtual hard drive on an SSD, and it's just not windows. I've got transparency, animations and all other kinds of baloney turned on. It's fast enough that, even though I don't need it, I can't possibly be bothered finding the off switch.

tl;dr: You can live in a virtualbox VM all day just fine - you just need RAM for 2 OS'es and applications.

Comment: Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (Score 3, Insightful) 249

by Dynetrekk (#42823149) Attached to: LibreOffice 4 Released

LibreOffice doesn't read or write the constantly mutating, rubbish file formats of MS Office the way only MS Office can.

True. LibreOffice actually helped me salvage a Word 2003 file into Word 2010, as Word 2010 itself would scramble the whole darned thing. Libre is much better, in my (limited) experience.

Comment: Linux ftw (Score 1) 317

by Dynetrekk (#42535567) Attached to: Better Tools For Programming Literacy
...again. Or, heck, Mac OS X for that matter. Give people the command line - it's the most powerful programming environment out there. Teach people simple automation tasks that will save you lotsa time later - change file names of all your holiday photos, convert movies with ffmpeg, copy files over the network, whatever. Simple conditionals, loops, and variables come along for the ride. It's right there when you open your mac/linux box and it's super useful right out of the box. When people see the amazing power of shell script automation, the route to programming should be short enough...

Comment: Re:Ultrabook's biggest problem: (Score 1) 513

by Dynetrekk (#41539619) Attached to: Why Ultrabooks Are Falling Well Short of Intel's Targets
I don't believe that for a second. I have an old machine with Win7 on it, and Win7 ate 50 GB of disk after installation. Mac OS X Lion eats much less - I haven't checked, really, but I'm guessing around 10 GB of disk, tops. Of course, linux can eat as little as you want, depending on what you install. At any rate, 120 GB SSD is fine both on my Macbook Pro and on my arch linux box, but would be a disaster on a windows machine.

Comment: More importantly (Score 2) 302

by Dynetrekk (#41300991) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What To Do With Found Calculators?
Quit using them in your teaching. Graphing calculators are the work of the devil. Kids spend a lot of energy learning something that is obsolete when outside schools, spend money on an overprised product (you can get a much more powerful netbook for the same price, ~ish), and wind up not learning how to do math by hand. That way, you'll stop finding old ones, too.

Oh, and obigatory xkcd.

The generation of random numbers is too important to be left to chance.

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