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Comment: Ah Tucows... (Score 3, Insightful) 65

by Dwedit (#48614443) Attached to: A Domain Registrar Is Starting a Fiber ISP To Compete With Comcast

Ah...Tucows...
Download anything from them and it will be loaded with extra adware with a very tricky sequence of clicks to not install any of it. Yes, this even means not agreeing what looks like a license agreement, but is actually an offer to install crap.

I'd probably take even Comcast over them.

Comment: Aspect ratio (Score 1) 567

by Dwedit (#48573661) Attached to: The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

Portrait displays were great when monitors were still 4:3 aspect ratio rather than 16:9. You could get a desktop width of 1024, and be just like a standard monitor, except much taller. You can even see entire pages in your word processor. But if you rotate a 16:9 monitor, it just looks absurdly tall and hard to deal with.

Network

Ask Slashdot: Getting Around Terrible Geolocation? 100

Posted by timothy
from the ok-but-does-this-get-you-irish-citizenship? dept.
First time accepted submitter AvitarX writes W3C has the IP address where I work as showing up in Ireland (we are in the USA). This is a nuisance for a lot of reasons (many dates now display in European format, prices are listed in euros, search results redirect to google.ie). Some of these issues can be worked around, but it's frustrating. I have searched as best as I can, and only can find information on the geolocation API in HTML5. The office is on a static IP address from Comcast. When I visit whatismyipaddress.com all info is correct except for W3C's result. I have submitted that it is inaccurate; is there anything else I can do? Googling, I have only managed to find usage examples for web developers/designers.
Classic Games (Games)

Internet Archive Launches Arcade of Classic Games In the Browser 94

Posted by Soulskill
from the doing-good-work dept.
SternisheFan tips news that the Internet Archive has launched the "Internet Arcade," a collection of over 900 arcade games from the '70s, '80s, and '90s that are free to play in an emulated, browser-based environment. The Arcade makes use of JavaScript Mess, which the crew at the Archive has been working on for several years. Obviously, a lot of people are going to migrate to games they recognize and ones that they may not have played in years. They’ll do a few rounds, probably get their @$%^& kicked, smile, and go back to their news sites. A few more, I hope, will go towards games they've never heard of, with rules they have to suss out, and maybe more people will play some of these arcades in the coming months than the games ever saw in their "real" lifetimes. And my hope is that a handful, a probably tiny percentage, will begin plotting out ways to use this stuff in research, in writing, and remixing these old games into understanding their contexts.

Comment: Standard remote access (Score 2) 334

by Dwedit (#47932905) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Remote Support For Disconnected, Computer-Illiterate Relatives

Use a SSH or VNC server, and also use a dynamic DNS client so you have a hostname instead of some random IP address, Then you can control the machine directly when it's online. VNC might be really slow over dialup though, you'd need to use Tight encoding with JPEG quality cranked all the way down to make it usable at all.

I usually end up tunneling VNC over SSH, and the VNC server only allows connections through the tunnel.

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