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Comment: Re:Scientific Computing (Score 1) 258

by Durinia (#42183391) Attached to: Toward An FSF-Endorsable Embedded Processor

For the record, the Tesla K20x TDP numbers include the memory (it's for the entire card).

A comment below says that it uses DDR3 1333. Total bandwidth of that, being extremely generous and giving them 6 memory channels (unlikely) puts you in the neighborhood of about 1/10th the memory bandwidth of the K20.

Combine that with the "how do you connect this to other things" problem, and this chip has no chance in scientific computing.

+ - University of Minnesota Launches Review Project for Open Textbooks

Submitted by Durinia
Durinia (72612) writes "Minnesota Public Radio is running a story today about the University of Minnesota's Open Textbooks project. The goal of the project is to solicit reviews of college-level open source textbooks and collect those that pass muster onto their website. The project will focus first on high-volume introductory classes such as those for Math and Biology, because as David Ernst, director of the project, states in the interview:

"You know the world doesn't need another $150 Algebra One book. Algebra One hasn't changed for centuries, probably."

"
Supercomputing

Cray's CX1 Desktop Supercomputer, Now For Sale 294

Posted by timothy
from the was-promised-is-here dept.
ocularb0b writes "Cray has announced the CX1 desktop supercomputer. Cray teamed with Microsoft and Intel to build the new machine that supports up to 8 nodes, a total of 64 cores and 64Gb of memory per node. CX1 can be ordered online with starting prices of $25K, and a choice of Linux or Windows HPC. This should be a pretty big deal for smaller schools and scientists waiting in line for time on the world's big computing centers, as well as 3D and VFX shops."

A New Concept in Supercomputers 113

Posted by CmdrTaco
Steve Kerrison writes "With the power of CPUs ever-increasing and the number of cores in a system increasing too, having a supercomputer sit under your desk is no longer a pipe dream. But generally speaking, the extreme high end of modern computing consists of a big ugly box housing that generates a lot of noise. A UK system integrator has developed a concept PC that blows that all away. The eXtreme Concept PC (XCP) has quite a romantic design story, with inspiration coming from concept cars and the sarcophagus-like Cray T90. The end result is a system that resembles a Cylon — computing power never looked so ominous. Although just a concept, the company behind the design reckons there could be a (small) market for the systems, with varying levels of compute power accompanied by appropriate (say, LN2) cooling."
Google

Google Street a Slice of Dystopian Future? 325

Posted by Zonk
from the they-see-you-man dept.
An anonymous reader writes "According to a recent CNET article, Google Street View 'is just wrong'. The short piece which makes up part of a larger feature about 'technology that's just wrong' goes on to explain that Google Street View is like a scene from George Orwell's terrifying dystopian vision of 1984 and that it could ultimately change our behaviour because we'll never know when we're being watched. 'Google? Aren't they the friendly folk who help me find Web sites, cheat at pub quizzes, and look at porn? Yes, but since 2006 they're also photographing the streets of selected world cities and posting the results online for all to see. It was Jeremy Bentham who developed the idea of the Panopticon, a system of prison design whereby everybody could be seen from one central point, with the upshot being that prisoners learnt to modulate their behaviour — because they never knew if they were being watched. And that doesn't sound like much fun, does it?'"
Supercomputing

SGI Acquires Linux Networx Assets, LNXI Dead? 96

Posted by kdawson
from the tags-involving-cluster-not-welcome dept.
anzha writes "It seems that that Linux Networx, the pioneering Linux supercomputing company, has gone belly up. SGI announced that it has bought the core assets of LNXI. Furthermore, the rumors are that the doors were locked and employees were just given their paychecks. This analysis, on the other hand, claims that SGI has 'made employment offers to many LNXI engineers.' It's unclear what kind of support will be extended to customers of LNXI's Clusterworx Advanced products. What does this mean for the future of Linux supercomputing?"
It's funny.  Laugh.

New Project To End Stupidity Online 336

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the then-they-make-a-better-idiot dept.
mrneutron2003 writes to tell us that StupidFilter, a new Open Source project started by Gabriel Ortiz and Paul Starr, plans to provide an intellectual prophylactic for memetically transmitted diseases. "Too long have we suffered in silence under the tyranny of idiocy. In the beginning, the internet was a place where one could communicate intelligently with similarly erudite people. Then, Eternal September hit and we were lost in the noise. The advent of user-driven web content has compounded the matter yet further, straining our tolerance to the breaking point. It's time to fight back."

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