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Iphone

Consumer Reports: New iPhones Not As Bendy As Believed 302

Posted by Soulskill
from the but-mah-hashtags dept.
An anonymous reader writes: Over the past several days, we've been hearing reports about some amount of users noticing that their brand new iPhone 6 Plus is bending in their pockets. The pictures and videos shown so far have kicked off an investigation, and Consumer Reports has done one of the more scientific tests so far. They found that the iPhone 6 Plus takes 90 pounds of pressure before it permanently deforms. The normal iPhone 6 took even less: 70 lbs. They tested other phones as well: HTC One (M8): 70 lbs, LG G3: 130 lbs, iPhone 5: 130 lbs, Samsung Galaxy Note 3: 150 lbs. The Verge also did a report on how Apple torture-tests its devices before shipping them. Apple's standard is about 55 lbs of pressure, though it does so thousands of times before looking for bends. One analysis suggests that Apple's testing procedure only puts pressure on the middle of the phone, which doesn't sufficiently evaluate the weakened area where holes have been created for volume buttons. Consumer Reports' test presses on the middle of the device as well.
Security

Security Collapse In the HTTPS Market 185

Posted by Soulskill
from the many-points-of-failure dept.
CowboyRobot writes: HTTPS has evolved into the de facto standard for secure Web browsing. Through the certificate-based authentication protocol, Web services and Internet users first authenticate one another ("shake hands") using a TLS/SSL certificate, encrypt Web communications end-to-end, and show a padlock in the browser to signal that a communication is secure. In recent years, HTTPS has become an essential technology to protect social, political, and economic activities online. At the same time, widely reported security incidents (such as DigiNotar's breach, Apple's #gotofail, and OpenSSL's Heartbleed) have exposed systemic security vulnerabilities of HTTPS to a global audience. The Edward Snowden revelations (notably around operation BULLRUN, MUSCULAR, and the lesser-known FLYING PIG program to query certificate metadata on a dragnet scale) have driven the point home that HTTPS is both a major target of government hacking and eavesdropping, as well as an effective measure against dragnet content surveillance when Internet traffic traverses global networks. HTTPS, in short, is an absolutely critical but fundamentally flawed cybersecurity technology.

+ - Why does the DNA double helix twist to the right?->

Submitted by Annanag
Annanag (3853767) writes "Most organic molecules have left- or right-handed versions, mirror images of each other, just like gloves. For some reason, life always seems to favour one version over the other — the DNA double helix in its standard form always twists like a right-handed screw, for example. But why this preference for left or right happens has always been a mystery. Now, in an experiment that took 13 years to perfect, physicists have found hints that this asymmetry of life could have been caused by electrons from nuclear decay in the early days of evolution."
Link to Original Source

+ - Multimedia multitasking shrinking human brains->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "It seems that switching between laptop, smart phone and tablet may be shrinking our brains and leaving us prone to higher levels of anxiety and stress reports news research from the University of Sussex in the UK. The researchers point out that the link is currently a correlation rather than a proof of causation, but they do suggest that people who used a higher number of media devices concurrently also had smaller grey matter density — in other words they have smaller brains."
Link to Original Source

+ - Finns go crazy get refurbished iPhone 4 - yes '4'->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Finnish retailer Verkkokauppa.com got pile of refurbished iPhone 4 models and decided to put them on sale for €99.90. When the stores were opened, a chaos broke as people tried to get into the store to buy one. Meanwhile, the rest of the world was queuing for iPhone 6..."
Link to Original Source

+ - Bug in Bash shell creates big security hole on anything with *nix in it->

Submitted by Dupple
Dupple (1016592) writes "A security vulnerability in the GNU Bourne Again Shell (Bash), the command-line shell used in many Linux and Unix operating systems, could leave systems running those operating systems open to exploitation by specially crafted attacks. “This issue is especially dangerous as there are many possible ways Bash can be called by an application,” a Red Hat security advisory warned."
Link to Original Source

+ - Apple privacy policy frustrates government->

Submitted by jamesrain
jamesrain (3853285) writes "The release of the Apple iOS 8 software meant that Apple updated its privacy policy. As a company that has always put personal privacy above all else, this means you can expect your personal information to be even more protected than before. But to what extent should you expect privacy, and at what point is the government going to step in and say no?

What privacy can you expect?

You might be wondering if the Apple privacy policy means you can avoid all government spying. Of course, that would be impossible. As Fox News explains, Apple can only control the information associated with its phones and Apple accounts. All other information is controlled elsewhere. For example, a phone tap could still happen because Apple does not provide the cell service, just the device. And spying through social media is still possible. The only things covered in the Apple privacy policy is anything associated with your Apple account, such as uploads to your cloud, photo storage, email, contacts, and even call history.

More or less, Apple has explained that it cannot access the data simply because it has created a privacy system where it cannot bypass your passcode. If a warrant is placed for access to account information, Apple can deny it because it has no way to access the info. For cops, this means they don’t have access even if they get judge authority. For you, it means your information is protected in all circumstances.

Government action?

It is possible the government could come in and say that Apple has to retain access to accounts in the event of a national crisis or threat to the nation; however, that has not yet happened. For now, Apple intends to provide as much privacy as possible to its customers, so they feel comfortable using their personal devices without fear of information leaking.

Some people are hesitant to trust Apple after the incident of leaked nude celebrity photos from the iCloud, but Apple says those were isolated incidents where hackers stole passcode data to get the images rather than the photos just getting leaked.

Privacy important to customers

As you are working on your automated text systems and allowing your customers to text you for an automated response, it is important that you keep their information private as well. There is nothing that will make a customer leave faster than finding out you just sold their personal information to another company. Make sure you have a privacy policy on your texting services clearly laid out when your customers sign up and again on your website to prevent confusion.

Mobile technology news brought to you by businesstexter.com

Source: foxnews.com/tech/2014/09/18/expert-apple-is-making-life-more-difficult-for-cops/"

Link to Original Source
Iphone

Apple Sells More Than 10 Million New iPhones In First 3 Days 206

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-it-now dept.
An anonymous reader writes Apple has announced that it sold over 10 million new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models, just three days after the launch on September 19. From the article: "Chief Executive Tim Cook said the company could have sold even more iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models if supplies had been available. Analysts had estimated first-weekend sales of up to 10 million iPhones, after Apple booked record pre-orders of 4 million on Sept. 12, the day pre-orders opened."
Iphone

Friendly Reminder: Do Not Place Your iPhone In a Microwave 240

Posted by samzenpus
from the bad-ideas dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes Placing your iPhone in the microwave will destroy the phone, and possibly the microwave. While that might seem obvious to some people, others have fallen for the "Wave" hoax making its way around online. The fake advertisement insists that the new iOS 8 allows users to charge their iPhones by placing them in a "household microwave for a minute and a half." Microwave energy will not charge your smartphone. To the contrary, it will scorch the device and render it inoperable. If you nuke your smartphone and subsequently complain about it online, people will probably make fun of you. (If you want a full list of things not to place in a microwave, no matter how pretty the flames, check this out.)
Privacy

Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died 236

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-out-of-the-mine dept.
HughPickens.com writes When Apple published its first Transparency Report on government activity in late 2013, the document contained an important footnote that stated: "Apple has never received an order under Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act. We would expect to challenge such an order if served on us." Now Jeff John Roberts writes at Gigaom that Apple's warrant canary has disappeared. A review of the company's last two Transparency Reports, covering the second half of 2013 and the first six months of 2014, shows that the "canary" language is no longer there suggesting that Apple is now part of FISA or PRISM proceedings.

Warrant canaries are a tool used by companies and publishers to signify to their users that, so far, they have not been subject to a given type of law enforcement request such as a secret subpoena. If the canary disappears, then it is likely the situation has changed — and the company has been subject to such request. This may also give some insight into Apple's recent decision to rework its latest encryption in a way that makes it almost impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police.
Chrome

Google Introduces HTML 5.1 Tag To Chrome 94

Posted by timothy
from the tagging-wars-ensue dept.
darthcamaro (735685) writes "Forget about HTML5, that's already passe — Google is already moving on to HTML5.1 support for the upcoming Chrome 38 release. Currently only a beta, one of the biggest things that web developers will notice is the use of the new "picture" tag which is a container for multiple image sizes/formats. Bottom line is it's a new way to think about the "IMG" tag that has existed since the first HTML spec."

+ - China smartphone maker Xiaomi apologizes for unauthorized data access 1

Submitted by SpzToid
SpzToid (869795) writes "Following up an earlier story here on Slashdot, now Xiaomi has apologized for collecting private data from its customers.

Xiaomi Inc said it had upgraded its operating system to ensure users knew it was collecting data from their address books after a report by a computer security firm said the Chinese budget smartphone maker was taking personal data without permission. The privately held company said it had fixed a loophole in its cloud messaging system that had triggered the unauthorized data transfer and that the operating system upgrade had been rolled out on Sunday. The issue was highlighted last week in a blog post by security firm F-Secure Oyg. In a lengthy blogpost on Google Plus, Xiaomi Vice President Hugo Barra apologized for the unauthorized data collection and said the company only collects phone numbers in users' address books to see if the users are online.

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Today's scientific question is: What in the world is electricity? And where does it go after it leaves the toaster? -- Dave Barry, "What is Electricity?"

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