Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Now if they will sell them without MS Windows (Score 1) 161

by Duckman5 (#49254879) Attached to: Ultralight Convertibles Approaching Desktop Performance
Thanks. I appreciate the offer. I'm making progress figuring things out. Finally got my stupid Canon printer working with it's lame proprietary drivers. Took some doing, but I'm better off for it. I know have a better understanding of how deb containers work. :) Anyway...next project is to figure out how to actually add a password at startup for the filesystem encryption. I'm pretty sure I clicked the box that said I would add a password later...but now I can't figure out how to add a password. LOL. Now I'm wondering if I did...that would be my luck.

Comment: Re:Just like knifes, Morphine, Bitcoin... (Score 1) 98

Tsk, tsk, tsk. Someone fell asleep in pharmacology. Heroin IS stronger than morphine because it has higher lipophilicity. That means it crosses the blood, brain barrier more readily. That means it gets into the tissues better, to the site of action better, and is a better painkiller. Kind of like codeine except you get better than 10% conversion to morphine so it doesn't suck when the times comes to actually do it's thing.

tldr; Heroin is morphine in a ninja suit. It sneaks past your body's barriers and totally owns your mu-receptors.

Comment: Re:Now if they will sell them without MS Windows (Score 1) 161

by Duckman5 (#49208989) Attached to: Ultralight Convertibles Approaching Desktop Performance
Umm..at this point I have no clue. I didn't even know it used SystemD until yesterday when I saw the configuration panel in KDE's System Settings. The documentation is kind of crap. I used Gentoo for years until I get fed up with a few broken ebuilds and used Ubuntu for a while.
We'll see how it works out in the end. I really liked upstart when I was using it and don't care for how all-encompassing SystemD has become, but if it works, it works.

Comment: Re:Now if they will sell them without MS Windows (Score 3, Informative) 161

by Duckman5 (#49208329) Attached to: Ultralight Convertibles Approaching Desktop Performance

Seriously?! Which part of that doesn't take a month to understand for someone that just wants to zip down to staples and grab a laptop with the expectation the install media will "just work" like it always has done for the last decade?

To use it, rename shim.efi to bootx64.efi and put it in /EFI/BOOT on your UEFI install media. Drop MokManager.efi in there as well. Finally, make sure your bootloader binary is called grubx64.efi and put it in the same directory.

Now generate a certificate and put the public half as a binary DER file somewhere on your install media. On boot, the end-user will be prompted with a 10-second countdown and a menu. Choose "Enroll key from disk" and then browse the filesystem to select the key and follow the enrolment prompts. Any bootloader signed with that key will then be trusted by shim, so you probably want to make sure that your grubx64.efi image is signed with it.

This part:

Secure Boot bootloader for distributions available now
Nov. 30th, 2012 07:51 pm

That link, as the text following the hyperlink says, is an announcement from 2 years ago. I referenced it to show how long this software has been available for use in other distributions.
Also, how many people who fit into your "just works" category are going to be making their own boot media? or managing their /boot partition manually? Zero. The hard part of those instructions are for the distribution maintainers. The second part is a one-time procedure of selecting "enroll-me.cer" from a list and then never doing it again. If you can select which partition you want to install your linux distro on, you can select which certificate to enroll.

Comment: Re:Now if they will sell them without MS Windows (Score 5, Informative) 161

by Duckman5 (#49207983) Attached to: Ultralight Convertibles Approaching Desktop Performance

You need to go into the BIOS and disable secure boot.

You don't even need to do that if you pick your linux version properly. I just finished installing Sabayon/Linux on my Lenovo U430p laptop after I decided I was going to reformat it anyway because of the recent Superfish fiasco. We've had a working secure boot shim for over 2 years now. No need to disable secure boot. Red Hat and Ubuntu both support it as well if you're looking for something a little more mainstream. At worst you may need to register a key with the BIOS (I did for Sabayon), but I'm not sure you even need to do that with Red Hat since their shim is actually signed by MS.

Comment: Firefox for Android FTW (Score 1) 188

by Duckman5 (#49133699) Attached to: Google Now Automatically Converts Flash Ads To HTML5
Amen to that. I finally had to make the switch, too. The ads and Javascript everywhere were just too much to bear on my tiny screen. There's even a version of NoScript for mobile Firefox .
I tried AdBlock Plus but it broke updates for MedScape and a couple other apps that I need. The Firefox addon version works like a charm, though.

Comment: Re:Don't crucify the FDA. They came out long ago.. (Score 4, Informative) 80

by Duckman5 (#49052397) Attached to: Unearthing Fraud In Medical Trials

Are you kidding me? Did you read where that came from? It's reposted from Mercola.com. The guy is a anti-vaxx quack with a minor history of battling with the fda. Not only that, but those extra regulations on supplements threaten his livelihood.

Does any of that mean that the FDA is perfect? No. The structure of the FDA is retarded. They require a whole series of clinical trials, have the evidence presented to their advisory team (composed of actual scientist and medical professionals) who make a recommendation, then a group of people (who have no legal requirement to know ANYTHING about medicine) vote on whether to approve the drug or not. That's how you end up with stupid garbage like Aricept 23mg getting regulatory approval (Over 2x the side effects with almost negligible gain on Mini Metal Status Exam compared to the 10mg dose? Yay! Put Grandpa on it today!)

The FDA is also only allowed to look at safety and efficacy data. They can't deny something on the basis of utility. Companies like this one make a killing on it. I'm not aware of a single novel medication that company makes. All they do is take stuff that has been on the market for decades, make it a gel instead of a cream or combine two products (so convenient), sell it for 10 or 20 times the generic price, and send an army of sales reps to convince gullible dermatologists to prescribe their products.

It would be crazy if it weren't true. There are some serious problems with the FDA that need to resolved. The ability to assess whether something is safe/effective or not is not one of them. The testing process is sound. The requirement to listen to the people who CAN assess the results, however, needs to be changed. Just for crying out loud, don't use Mercola as a source. His scientific reasoning ability is clearly questionable.

Comment: Re:(bdum tish) (Score 1) 215

by Duckman5 (#49037505) Attached to: Russia Seeking To Ban Tor, VPNs and Other Anonymizing Tools
While it's true that Alaska is sizeable, it's not very sporting to use a country's former peninsula against it. Perhaps we could offer up Florida as the US example instead? That one used to be Spanish. Plus, it's got a more appropriate shape.
You know...now that I'm thinking about it. The US must have some serious peninsula envy if it keeps taking them from other countries...

Comment: Of course (Score 1) 209

by Duckman5 (#47243481) Attached to: How Tim Cook Is Filling Steve Jobs's Shoes

so when Google released their 7" tablet in July 2012, I bought one.

Then, in October 2012, Apple did a "me too!" and announced the iPad mini. I still think it was a reactionary move and I doubt the iPad mini would have surfaced at all if someone else hadn't released it first.

Wait, you think the iPad mini was approved, designed, engineered, mass manufactured and released in four months?

Haven't you ever heard of rapid prototyping?
This it's the Apple development cycle here! It's not like anyone expects a finished product out of anything first generation.

Comment: Re:Still lacking (Score 1) 132

by Duckman5 (#43503741) Attached to: Did B&N Pass On the 6.8" E-ink Screen That Kobo Snapped Up?
Forget even connecting the Nook to your computer. I rooted my Nook Simple Touch and installed DropSync on it. That combined with Calibre's "connect to folder" feature and dropbox on my PC allows me to remotely manage all the books on my Nook. The set up isn't as easy as simply logging into your Kindle for Amazon's Whispersync, but it is more powerful since I can also REMOVE books as well as add them.

Comment: Be careful! (Score 5, Informative) 667

by Duckman5 (#37955572) Attached to: Fee Increase Attempt Inspires 'Dump Your Bank Day'
I have had so many problems with Bank of America it's not even funny. They don't understand the words "close my account." After I get fed up with them nickel and dimeing me to death, I closed my account with them. I moved everything over to my new bank, but forgot to delete my debit card from paypal. Bad move. Six months later, my wife bought something on ebay and selected the debit card by accident. Not only did they let the charge go through, the tried to charge me overdraft fees galore. They even proceeded to send me letters threatening to turn me over to some agency so I would be banned from opening a checking account with any major bank. Remember, this is SIX MONTHS after I had them "close" that account. I will NEVER open an account with them again.

Political Mudslinging Via YouTube, MySpace 249

Posted by Zonk
from the don't-forget-to-duck dept.
An anonymous reader writes "BusinessWeek takes a look at how political campaigns are taking the time-honored tradition of political mudslinging digital. One notable example: In the Virginia Senate race incumbent Republican George Allen held a comfortable lead over challenger Jim Webb until one of Webb's camera-toting aides captured footage of Allen making a racial slur during a campaign stop. The video soon held the number 1 ranking on YouTube and gained national attention. Allen has since taken a steep drop in the polls, and Republicans now risk losing a seat they thought secure."

Comment: Re:Just fine (Score 1) 389

by Duckman5 (#15208145) Attached to: Blu-Ray/HD-DVD Talks End
Actually, they did make drives that used multiple beams. My friend had what claimed to be a 72x CD-ROM drive that used this technology. I guess it didn't really catch on so well, though, as I don't think I've seen any of these in the stores lately and I think Zen Research is out of business. Well, at least their website is dead.

Wifi and Laptops Adds Up To Theft 329

Posted by Zonk
from the i'm-being-stolen-right-now dept.
Ant writes to mention an SFGate article about the increase in laptop theft in the world of ubiquitous wifi. From the article: "San Francisco police statistics show a disturbing trend. Just 18 laptop computer robberies were logged in 2004, but the figure jumped to 48 last year. There were 18 as of the end of March, a pace that could surpass 70 crimes this year. 'It's a changing culture, and crime is following it'"

Tech Workers in Higher Demand 325

Posted by Zonk
from the buy-some-knowledge dept.
mjdroner writes "CNN has a story on an employment consulting firm report showing job cuts in the tech sector are down 40 percent." From the article: "Despite the inevitable job-cutting that typically follows mergers, the job market picture for the nation's tech workers is definitely improving. Many job seekers in high-demand fields such as storage systems administration and information security are probably finding themselves in the driver's seat when it comes to negotiating employment terms"

Who goeth a-borrowing goeth a-sorrowing. -- Thomas Tusser

Working...