Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: World Broadband Foundation (fighting caps) (Score 1) 353

by Drunkenfist (#44787015) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Do You Fight Usage Caps?
I actually founded the World Broadband Foundation to fight caps two years ago. http://www.worldbroadbandfoundation.org/ The method being to map broadband globally so it can be easily compared, and at the same time be used as a means to pressure bad/capped regions with the good ones. However I have had to deprioritize it for now and work on immigration reform/startup visa from a combination of needing to be in the US to really grow/raise funds and also Canada/Toronto being an unworkable place for anyone who works from home. Their infrastructure and choices available are also very subpar and you can read the about section to see the events here that forced my hand to found this.

Switching providers or to the competition is a fallacy since most places don't have any competition anymore thanks for franchise agreements, or at best a duopoly especially in the US. To REALLY "switch" people have to be willing and able to move and to invest in places that do have good broadband infrastructure and to ignore and economically affect those that do not. Supporting municipal networks, Google Fiber, and Sonic type projects and stop giving money to providers who cap. Aside from that property values, business investment, even tax dollars. These are now our weapons. The US is lucky enough to still have a private sector and local govts who have the means to build alternative networks. This is a luxury that many other countries like Canada do not. Support it and nurture it. Do not let these bastards win.

Others in the fight.
http://stopthecap.com/
http://www.muninetworks.org/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/186439608067383/ - Stop AT&T from capping, a FB group though no action is really happening. It's just a place to meet other like-minded folks

Comment: Better suited for older/more senior guys (Score 4, Insightful) 52

by Drunkenfist (#44014153) Attached to: How the Linux Foundation Runs Its Virtual Office
Virtual offices are awesome but better suited to mid-senior or older employees who have learned the discipline be productive unsupervised and are jaded enough to hate the bullshit office politics. Younger people still fundamentally want to feel like they are "part of something" or a real company so imo you still need that office structure if anything train them up. This is probably the next thing colleges should focus on, getting people "virtual-ready" from the get-go. This should be avoided at all costs for freshers straight out of college or only with college experience since the mentality is entirely different, to them this is a signal that they can slack or blow-off. There needs to be a minimum of one thing finished or shipped on their resume before they are given trial privileges. The downside is that if you have an entirely virtual office you also limit yourself to the mix of people who are either more senior or otherwise "fit" the personality for it and younger guys without having developed the structure from office experience may never get it. Self motivation not just for sprints, but for the long haul is key. The office structure is a by-product of military command and control evolution predicating on the assumption that people start out worthless to begin with and need to be whipped into shape. On the other hand the virtual office structure assumes people are competent and anything inbetween ends up with some level of added cost one way or another

Q: How many IBM CPU's does it take to execute a job? A: Four; three to hold it down, and one to rip its head off.

Working...