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Submission + - Kindle Spying (

Sherri Davidoff writes: "Josh Wright recently purchased a new Kindle. Surprisingly, when he downloaded one of his books onto the new Kindle, it offered to open it to the page where he had left off on his old Kindle. In other words, Amazon tracked not just the books he was reading, but specifically which sections of the book he was looking at. 'Amazon is able to determine what pages I've read and which I've skipped,' Josh said. 'They can determine the pages I've re-read (such as the hacking U3 drives section in my Kindle copy of Hacking Exposed), which could potentially be used against me as evidence in a court of law, for example. They could even monitor how much time I spend reading, and when (useful information for an employer who might want to know when their employees are slacking off and not working). I'd like to find out what Amazon's privacy policy is about this data, and what they are retaining long-term. Do they record only the last page read for each of my books, purging this information after a period of time, or is it more nefarious?'"

Submission + - FireFox To Get Multi-Process Separation

An anonymous reader writes: FireFox 3.5 is a very strong contender in the browser market but one feature it lacks that Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 8 has is multi-process browsing. Multi-process browsing gives the browser ultimate stability and performance for computers with multiple processors or CPU cores by having each page or tab, run in a separate process. This means each tab could theoretically could be on separate processors or cores giving you a performance boost over having just one process (the browser) running on just one CPU or core. We gain not only performance from this type of process separation, we also gain security because if one page ends up being malicious its process can be closed and is segregated from the remaining browser processes.

Submission + - Current Security Technologies Impede E-commerce (

Mirko Zorz writes: "A recent survey revealed consumers showed no desire to understand the mechanics of IT security in more detail and had high expectations about their rights if affected by a security threat. Consumers suggest they would not respond favorably to stricter security. Despite 66% stating they would be more confident online if websites imposed additional security measures, they were unlikely to accept these measures if it meant the transaction process increased in either time or complexity. In fact, 26% reported that such measures would drive them onto competitors' sites."

Every cloud has a silver lining; you should have sold it, and bought titanium.