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Comment: Re:Do you need to? (Score 2) 429

by DrCode (#43746613) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With a Fear of Technological Change?

Yes, true. I'm *really* old at almost 60. And I've found that you can't keep up with everything; but you don't have to. Some things go away before you get a chance to feel foolish for not using them (like MySpace, and just about anything that Microsoft makes:-)).

In my case, I'm still using Emacs/gcc/gdb to write C code where I work. But I've ported my old open-source project to Android using Eclipse with Java, and my Android phone is my main internet and entertainment device when I travel. And I'm an avid Facebook user, but don't feel I'm missing anything by avoiding Twitter.

After a while, you'll develop a better sense of whether something is a fad (or marketing ploy), or a useful development worth pursuing.

Comment: I AM that dad... (Score 1) 674

by DrCode (#36914566) Attached to: Why Your Dad's 30-Year-Old Stereo Sounds Better Than Yours

... you insensitive clod! And I still have my phonograph and speakers from 40 years ago. The phonograph is still quite good, with a 3 Kg platter that's hard to find on anything reasonably priced nowadays, and a recently upgraded cartridge. But the speakers, old KLH 17's, really weren't that great new, and probably should be replaced. I'd assume the right way to go would be to visit a real audio store like Magnolia and listen to different speakers using the same sound source. But as the article pointed out, we've become spoiled by the convenience of modern gadgets, and it's too easy to pick up something cheap at Best Buy or Frye's.

Comment: Re:Developers (Score 1) 450

by DrCode (#34716056) Attached to: Thin Client, Or Fat Client? That Is the Question

Yes, I'm a developer at an EDA company, and it is the same with me. I have a rack-mounted server somewhere on the campus, and I use Nxclient to connect to it, along with VPN when I'm at home. So no matter where I am, I get the same desktop the way I left it, as the server is rarely rebooted. We have a large code-base and there is a huge array of tools needed for building and testing, so it wouldn't make sense to try to get them on a local machine.

Someone above said it was about 'control', but that's only partially true. Yes, the tools and source-code are centralized. But it also gave me more freedom, for example, using Ubuntu on my company laptop, since all I need is Nxclient (or VNC) it order to get work done.

Always draw your curves, then plot your reading.

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