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Comment: Re:call it the Ukraine-2 (Score 1) 140

by circletimessquare (#49364607) Attached to: Russia Wants To Work With NASA On a New Space Station

What Russia did to Georgia in 2008 is a continuation of what Georgia did to itself in the early nineties

i stopped reading there

russia has no right to invade a sovereign country. do you understand? of course they have a "reason." do you have a functioning brain? can you see through their bullshit?

russia meddled in an *internal* georgian dispute that occurred within the internationally recognized borders of georgia. then it divided the country into a "new" bullshit country abkhazia

is it ok if the usa invades the mexican district of sonora and announces that it is a new country? why can the usa do this? uhhh... drug smuggling. yeah, that's our reason. perfectly good reason, totally understandable, right moron?

what was russia's reaons for invading georgia? guess what: it has no fucking right to invade and divide a sovereign country on those hopped reasons. do you understand what sovereignty is?

can the american fbi go into canada and arrest people? no? why not. can the us army occupy ontario? why not? because canada is a sovereign country, you dumb fuck

why do you think it's perfectly normal and ok for russia to invade and divide it's smaller neighbors? it's not normal. it's not acceptable

no country, anywhere in the world, does what russia did to georgia and ukraine without consequences. not south africa and mozambique. not china and vietnam. not brazil and uruguay. countries do not invade other sovereign countries and that's just normal and fine. do you understand?

if you do, continue speaking on this topic. but if you continue to assert russia invading and dividing georgia and ukraine is "reasonable" then you do not understand what the fuck sovereignty means and are therefore announcing yourself as a complete moron or a propagandized idiot on this topic and you should shut up

Comment: Re:call it the Ukraine-2 (Score 1) 140

by circletimessquare (#49363897) Attached to: Russia Wants To Work With NASA On a New Space Station

if you know your history, the area is ottoman, tatar, lithuanian, polish...

history can be used to justify any ignorant adventurist shit you can devise

what's actually important is the fucking borders of a fucking sovereign nation, and that modern states respect that

you didn't notice the imperial bullshit russia did on georgia in 2008?

russia is doing imperialism 1850 style. it needs to be, and will be, punished for being a stinking pile of destabilizing shit because of insecure nationalism. oh glorious russia has fallen from historical highs, boo hoo. and it will fall further now

Comment: Re:DVD patents expiring (Score 1) 68

by evilviper (#49363805) Attached to: Another Patent Pool Forms For HEVC

At least the patents on DVDs are expiring if not already expired. The first DVD player was sold in 1996, and patents can be good for up to 20 years from the filing date, so it would seem that by late next year, all necessary patents should have expired.

This is HORRIBLE legal advice. Patent laws were different before 1996, that's why MP3 patents are still around (and will be until 2017) despite the fact that specifications were published back in 1991!

In the United States, "patents filed prior to 8 June 1995 expire 17 years after the publication date of the patent, but application extensions make it possible for a patent to issue" quite a few years after initial filing.

MP3 patents have mostly expired, though one US patent expires later this year.

I wish that was true, but it's certainly not:

http://www.tunequest.org/a-big...

+ - Australian government outlines website-blocking scheme->

Submitted by angry tapir
angry tapir (1463043) writes "The Australian government has revealed its (previously mooted) proposed legislation that will allow copyright holders to apply for court orders that will force ISPs to block access to pirate websites. It forms part of a broader Australian crackdown on online copyright infringement, which also includes a warning notice scheme for alleged infringers."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:call it the Ukraine-2 (Score 1) 140

by circletimessquare (#49363323) Attached to: Russia Wants To Work With NASA On a New Space Station

they call ukraine "new russia"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N...

i suggest the usa call kamchatka "new alaska"

china can reclaim outer manchuria they lost to russia in the mid 1800s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O...

fuck you russia, imperial bullying douchebag

we should not be doing any space program with these assholes, we should be shutting down programs

+ - Another Patent Pool Forms for HEVC->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A new patent pool, dubbed HEVC Advance, has formed for the HEVC video codec. This pool offers separate licensing from the existing MPEG LA HEVC patent pool. In an article for CNET Stephen Shankland writes, "HEVC Advance promises a 'transparent' licensing process, but so far it isn't sharing details except to say it's got 500 patents it describes as essential for using HEVC, that it plans to unveil its license in the third quarter, and that expected licensors include General Electric, Technicolor, Dolby, Philips and Mitsubishi Electric. The group's statement suggested that some patent holders weren't satisfied with the money they'd make through MPEG LA's license. One of HEVC Advance's goals is 'delivering a balanced business model that supports HEVC commercialization'... HEVC Advance and MPEG LA aren't detailing what led to two patent pools, an outcome that undermines MPEG LA's attempt to offer a convenient 'one-stop shop' for companies needing a license." Perhaps this will lead to increased adoption of royalty-free video codecs such as VP9. Monty Montgomery of Xiph has some further commentary."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:He's good. (Score 1, Informative) 183

yeah, i despise the plutocracy, the abuse of our political system by corporations, how wall street and bankers are allowed to get away with terrible crimes, etc.

but a bank is a fucking completely normal institution we all need. it just needs to be heavily regulated to function fairly

to call all banks evil and and all bankers evil just makes you out to be a complete moron

good luck with not getting robbed once people find out you stuff your money in your mattress

+ - Ikea Refugee Shelter Entering Production

Submitted by jones_supa
jones_supa (887896) writes "A rather interesting product, Ikea's line of flatpack refugee shelters are going into production, the Swedish furniture maker announced this week. The lightweight Better Shelter was developed under a partnership between the Ikea Foundation and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and beta tested among refugee families in Ethiopia, Iraq, and Lebanon. Each unit takes about four hours to assemble and is designed to last for three years — far longer than conventional refugee shelters, which typically last about six months. The product is important tool in the prolonged refugee crisis that has unfolded across the Middle East. The war in Syria has spurred nearly 4 million people to leave their homes. The UNHCR has agreed to buy 10,000 of the shelters, and will begin providing them to refugee families this summer."

Comment: Re:Perfection is unattainable. (Score 1) 365

by circletimessquare (#49361145) Attached to: Modern Cockpits: Harder To Invade But Easier To Lock Up

yes, i am familiar with this faulty line of reasoning

the simple response to your logical fallacy is: because grey areas exist doesn't mean black and white don't exist

it might not be possible to draw a hard line on behavior. but there is behavior which is clearly not in a grey area and clearly calls for a judgment against you

this pilot had clear signs of being untrustworthy to fly commercially. it's not fuzzy and unsure

if you don't believe me, wait until a few years when the first verdicts come down in this case. a judge/ jury will decide on his employer/ the govt fucking up. the facts as they appear now show a clear problem that should have precluded him from piloting any plane with people on board

Comment: Re:No it isn't. (Score 1) 52

by circletimessquare (#49361123) Attached to: Notel Media Player Helps North Koreans Skirt Censorship

NK puts its citizens in *concentration camps* for crimes, some petty, some political

*three generations* of prisoners

your granddad looked the wrong way at the wrong way

therefore, you are born in and suffer as a malnourished slave

this isn't a *political disagreement* i have, moron, this is me making an observation of extremely gross human rights abuses, that no other country in today's world approaches, save perhaps in the areas controlled by ISIS and Boko Haram. NK goes far, far beyond any cruelty in the USA and Saudi Arabia, or any other real country

the simple fact is you have no fucking clue what you are talking about

and, again, you lack a sense of proportionality and degree

your knowledge on this topic is deficient

and your judgment is wrong in such a way that tends to suggest a general deficiency, off on more than just geopolitics

you should stop talking about this topic unless you like being laughed at by anyone serious and intelligent

China

IBM and OpenPower Could Mean a Fight With Intel For Chinese Server Market 81

Posted by timothy
from the round-the-mulberry-bust dept.
itwbennett writes With AMD's fade out from the server market and the rapid decline of RISC systems, Intel has stood atop the server market all by itself. But now IBM, through its OpenPOWER Foundation, could give Intel and its server OEMs a real fight in China, which is a massive server market. As the investor group Motley Fool notes, OpenPOWER is a threat to Intel in the Chinese server market because the government has been actively pushing homegrown solutions over foreign technology, and many of the Foundation members, like Tyan, are from China.

+ - Intel Finally Has a Challenger in the Server Market: IBM->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "With AMD's fade out from the server market and the rapid decline of RISC systems, Intel has stood atop the server market all by itself. But now IBM, through its OpenPOWER Foundation, could give Intel and its server OEMs a real fight in China, which is a massive server market. As the investor group Motley Fool notes, OpenPOWER is a threat to Intel in the Chinese server market because the government has been actively pushing homegrown solutions over foreign technology, and many of the Foundation members like Tyan are from China."
Link to Original Source
Government

Taxpayer Subsidies To ULA To End 39

Posted by timothy
from the but-don't-they-know-about-the-multiplier? dept.
schwit1 writes Because it has concluded that they make it impossible to have a fair competition for contracts, the Air Force has decided to phase out taxpayer subsidies to the United Launch Alliance (ULA). The specific amounts of these subsidies have been effectively buried by the Air Force in many different contracts, so we the taxpayers really don't know how much the are. Nonetheless, this decision, combined with the military report released yesterday that criticized the Air Force's over-bearing and restrictive certification process with SpaceX indicates that the political pressure is now pushing them hard to open up bidding to multiple companies, which in turn will help lower cost and save the taxpayer money.

+ - Taxpayer subsidies to ULA to end

Submitted by schwit1
schwit1 (797399) writes "Because it has concluded that they make it impossible to have a fair competition for contracts, the Air Force has decided to phase out taxpayer subsidies to the United Launch Alliance (ULA).

The specific amounts of these subsidies have been effectively buried by the Air Force in many different contracts, so we the taxpayers really don’t know how much the are.

Nonetheless, this decision, combined with the military report released yesterday that criticized the Air Force’s over-bearing and restrictive certification process with SpaceX indicates that the political pressure is now pushing them hard to open up bidding to multiple companies, which in turn will help lower cost and save the taxpayer money."

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