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Comment: When the people who say it's a crisis.... (Score 4, Insightful) 200

When the people who say it's a crisis act like it's a crisis, then maybe I'll look into the matter. Until then, I have a hard time taking a finger-wagging jet setter seriously. You know the type, they want to make everything more expensive so only the rich can enjoy the benefits of modern life.

"F*ck the poor people who want to stay warm, or get to a job. They should die off anyway, the earth is overpopulated!"

Comment: Re:Compromise: (Score 1) 491

by dfenstrate (#47868959) Attached to: To Really Cut Emissions, We Need Electric Buses, Not Just Electric Cars

Humans like cars, not buses.

Americans like cars not buses thanks to decades of marketing getting shoved down their throats. That's led to a chicken/egg situation where it's hard to get around without a car because everyone has them.

Have you ever actually ridden a bus? You sound like someone with little experience riding a bus daily.

Comment: Re:So long as it is consential (Score 4, Interesting) 363

by dfenstrate (#47840507) Attached to: Bill Gates Wants To Remake the Way History Is Taught. Should We Let Him?
I really think school districts ought to start performing audits of the expenses associated with receiving federal money. Some districts have found, for example, that if they opt out of the federal school lunch guidelines championed by the first lady, the programs are quickly back in the black. Less wasted food, more purchases, and no time spent verifying compliance for grant money. The federal funds were insufficient to cover the losses associated with the mandates that came with the money.

I suspect a lot of federal school mandates would end up the same way. Ditching federal money might allow for a number of compliance administrators to be cut from a school district, and give teachers more time to do their jobs.

Comment: ...compared to the power of ACTING!! (Score 3, Insightful) 181

by dfenstrate (#47575311) Attached to: Unesco Probing Star Wars Filming In Ireland

The power to destroy a habitat is nothing next to the power of Money.

One must really wonder what is so special about this location, that they A) feel the need to risk damage to the habitats to film, and B) could not be reproduced in a green screen environment like they do everything else.

Excessive use of green screen likely helped Episodes 1-3 be so terrible- wooden acting being one of the many problems. An actor's performance can only be improved by actually being in the environment their character is supposed to be in.

Comment: Good luck with that. (Score 5, Insightful) 317

by dfenstrate (#47565021) Attached to: Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' Ability To Rip CD Music To Hard Drive
I'm sure GM and Ford have better lawyers, and I imagine they have more resources to throw at the affair as well. I also imagine that GM and Ford will team up for their defense, and make AARC cry. GM and Ford's lawyers signed off on the system before it was even developed, let alone installed in cars. The AARC is going to waste millions and go home with nothing.

Comment: Re:Wait for it... (Score 4, Informative) 752

by dfenstrate (#47476953) Attached to: Malaysian Passenger Plane Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine

Too much of a coincidence for a plane to crash in a war zone where a fighter was shot down just the other day and a transport aircraft An-26 was shot down by a missile at 25,000ft couple of days ago. And by the way, why would a commercial airliner fly through such an airspace anyway?

No U.S. carrier has been allowed to fly over certain parts of Ukraine since the end of April, due to an FAA order.

Comment: About that.... (Score 3, Informative) 223

by dfenstrate (#47416619) Attached to: Meet the Muslim-American Leaders the FBI and NSA Have Been Spying On

Every American should incorporate themselves. It's the only way to guarantee you have rights. If you are a closely held corporation, your religious rights cannot be infringed, your property cannot be confiscated, you can commit heinous crimes and only face a fine (no jail time for CEOs); and furthermore, NSA "spying" can be sued over as industrial espionage or as copyright violations under intellectual property rights laws.

Basically you have way more rights as a corporation. If you're an individual or "citizen", you're screwed.

I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you're someone who hates the recent hobby lobby decision; nonetheless, the opinion delivered by Alito directly addresses this 'corporations are treated like people and it's wrong!!!' outrage perpetuated by the left.

"As we will show, Congress provided protection for people like the Hahns and Greens by employing a familiar legal fiction: It included corporations within RFRA’s definition of “persons.” But it is important to keep in mind that the purpose of this fiction is to provide protection for human beings. A corporation is simply a form of organization used by human beings to achieve desired ends. An established body of law specifies the rights and obligations of the people (including shareholders, officers, and employees) who are associated with a corporation in one way or another. When rights, whether constitutional or statutory, are extended to corporations, the purpose is to protect the rights of these people. For example, extending Fourth Amendment protection to corporations protects the privacy interests of employees and others associated with the company. Protecting corporations from government seizure of their property without just compensation protects all those who have a stake in the corporations’ financial well-being. And protecting the free-exercise rights of corporations like Hobby Lobby, Conestoga, and Mardel protects the religious liberty of the humans who own and control those companies.

In holding that Conestoga, as a “secular, for-profit corporation,” lacks RFRA protection, the Third Circuit wrote as follows: “General business corporations do not, separate and apart from the actions or belief systems of their individual owners or employees, exercise religion. They do not pray, worship, observe sacraments or take other religiously-motivated actions separate and apart from the intention and direction of their individual actors.” 724 F. 3d, at 385 (emphasis added).

All of this is true—but quite beside the point. Corporations, “separate and apart from” the human beings who own, run, and are employed by them, cannot do anything at all."

Comment: Misused? Murder is intrinsic in communism. (Score 1, Insightful) 530

by dfenstrate (#47404781) Attached to: Foxconn Replacing Workers With Robots

Unfortunately, communism has earned a fatally bad reputation after being misused by so many dictators during the 20th century.

The murder part of communism is a necessary component to deal with people who don't want to play along. That's why it happens all the time. If you don't want to play by the rules of a society that has anything resembling a market economy, the outcome is well known: Your standard of living slides down to the lowest your fellow citizens will tolerate seeing.

If you don't want to play by the rules of a society with a Marxist economy, well, abject poverty is always an option there, too. A rather common one. But if you want to work for yourself, and keep a significant portion of the fruits of your labor? Well, sorry, that's where the murder comes in. Against the fundamental rules of the society, you see.

If you disagree, kindly tell me what you do with people in your ideal communist society who want to put in above-average effort, and reap the extra rewards. Besides murdering them. The communist societies that exist within larger market economies can eject slackers, and the motivated can simply leave. The societies that are entirely communist need other options. Exiling the motivated will simply rapidly impoverish those that remain.

Comment: Re:Administrators (Score 4, Insightful) 538

by dfenstrate (#47290073) Attached to: Teaching College Is No Longer a Middle Class Job

In all aspects of education, from primary school to university, the growing swarms of administrators soak up the budget. In some school systems, they vastly outnumber the actual teachers, have better pay, and yet contribute nothing to the operation of the schools.

You beat me to it. It's time for adjunct administrators and more full time professors.

Comment: stumpwm (Score 1) 611

by Digi-John (#47129515) Attached to: Which desktop environment do you like the best?

It's a tiling window manager written in Common Lisp, which means I can change any of the behavior on the fly. I guess you can do the same with xmonad, but I don't know Haskell, I do know a bit of Lisp.

Unlike a lot of tiling window managers, it does user-defined "static" layouts. You start with a single frame covering the whole screen. You can split that vertically or horizontally. You can then split either of the new frames vertically or horizontally, and so on. When I used to use i3 and xmonad, I'd get annoyed when my windows kept moving around and resizing whenever I opened/closed a window. Now I have a few different virtual desktops with layouts I find useful. Browsing on one, with a big frame for the browser and some smaller ones on the sides for xterms. Programming has half the screen for emacs, the other half for an xterm or two.

It takes a second or two to start, because let's face it, modern Lisp implementations are slow to launch, but once it's running it's quite responsive. Memory footprint isn't tiny (we're running a full Common Lisp system here), but I'd wager it's still smaller than KDE, GNOME, or Unity.

One thing I really loved was that the default keybindings were good. The default keybindings in WMs like i3 often eat a bunch of bindings for other programs--I had a hell of a time using i3 and emacs at the same time, for instance. Most of the commands are prefixed with a Ctrl-T, so you'd hit "C-t c" to create a new terminal, sort of like doing an Emacs command (C-x C-s). Yes, I know you want Ctrl-T to open a new tab in your browser; to send a Ctrl-T, you just hit it twice (C-t C-t). You can also add keybindings to the running WM using a little snippet of Lisp code, and if you like it, stick that in your .stumpwm file so it works every time. I left most things default but added Alt- to switch between desktops.

Comment: The disease spreads.... (Score 1) 389

. Mitt Romney takes advantage of loop-holes in tax laws to hide his money from US taxes by shuffling it around shell corporations in the Cayman islands. Mitt pays accountants and lawyers to set all that stuff up. The whole reason the US produces so many lawyers is to help rich people and corporations walk right up the the often fuzzy line between what is legal and what isn't.

Oh, look, it's a 'Take every chance to blame an enemy of the left whenever possible even though it's not remotely connected to the topic at hand' post. I thought these were confined to fark.com; it appears I was mistaken, and it also appears there are moderators on board. Perhaps your very own sock puppet moderators.

Today's scientific question is: What in the world is electricity? And where does it go after it leaves the toaster? -- Dave Barry, "What is Electricity?"

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