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Comment: So badly misguided (Score 5, Insightful) 260

by DerekLyons (#47708299) Attached to: If Fusion Is the Answer, We Need To Do It Quickly

That has to be one of the most misguided ideas I've ever seen...

Worry about using deuterium and tritium being used to boost the output of a fission weapon is like worrying about whether a heavily armed maniac's getaway car can do 120mph rather than 115mph. The basic problem isn't the speed of the get away car. If a proliferator can get their hands on sufficient U235 or Pu in the first place, they're 99.99996% of the way towards their goal - the extra .00003 provided by the availability of deuterium and tritium is all but meaningless because when it comes to proliferators it's the mere fact that they have a weapon in the first place that's the problem. That they can now build two or more, or increase the yield of a single weapon simply doesn't count for much when even a low kiloton range weapon is sufficient for their needs. (Which is deterrence generally, or failing that attacks against non military area targets. They aren't trying to crack open Cheyenne Mountain.)

Comment: Re:well (Score 2) 186

by DerekLyons (#47704983) Attached to: Phoenix Introduces Draft Ordinance To Criminalize Certain Drone Uses

B) Do people legally have privacy in an uncovered yard? I don't think they do. I'm talk about legal, not rudeness.

If they're not visible from a public location (E.G. behind a wall or otherwise hidden from the sidewalk), they're currently considered to have privacy under the law.

Looking at the upmodded comments in this and previous discussion, I'm actually quite disappointed in Slashdot... Usually, one of the battle cries here is "but on a computer doesn't make it different", and they're strong advocates of personal privacy. But drones... drones are cool. Drones are sexy. Drones are geeky. That seems to make "but using a drone" different and the issues of personal privacy go away.

Comment: Re:The question should be, what is causing delays? (Score 1) 140

by DerekLyons (#47687551) Attached to: Delays For SC Nuclear Plant Put Pressure On the Industry

The submitter (mdsolar) may or may not have participated, but clearly has an axe to grind and the willingness to exploit the situation to peddle his ideology

mdsolar is, if you've followed nuclear and alternative power stories on /. for the past couple of years, seriously anti-nuclear - to the point of mendaciousness.

Comment: Re:Unity is 64 bit now (Score 1) 126

by DerekLyons (#47683721) Attached to: Switching Game Engines Halfway Through Development

Kerbal Space Program (a bleeding edge physics sandbox game built in Unity that includes orbital space travel) had unofficial 64 bit support back in... February '14? And now has official 64-bit support.

And KSP is full of weird engine based bugs, and the "official" 64 bit version is even buggier and (per the dev team) essentially use-at-your-own-risk.

So no, it's not *quite* as simple as you would have it. (And yes, I do play KSP.)

Comment: Re:The utility/need/desire exists (Score 1) 107

by DerekLyons (#47667647) Attached to: Where are the Flying Cars? (Video; Part One of Two)

But outside the big cities, which comprise less than 2% of the land area of the US, there are lots of use cases for a flying car.

If there are "lots of use cases", why can't you provide any? The energy cost of flying to your parent's house by air far exceeds that of driving. And unless you fly regularly (more than once a month), there's little economic sense in purchasing maintaining an expensive flying car in exchange for a modest gain in convenience in travel to either your parent's place or an airport. Neither use case makes any sense unless you've money to burn or an extremely high personal level of impatience - fringe cases both.

The OP is correct, there doesn't appear to be many use cases that justify the additional TCO.

Comment: Re:Larger request (Score 1) 134

by DerekLyons (#47617851) Attached to: Aaron's Law Is Doomed and the CFAA Is Still Broken

What's the point? If I'm innocent then 6 months in any prison is wrong.

The point? The great grandparent is wrong in his version of events and misleading in his statements of how the system works, probably deliberately so. The grandparent corrects him as to the facts of the situation.
 
And he wasn't innocent. (Something many people forget, or rather deliberately ignore.) He committed a crime and was offered a modest punishment - but he turned it down to engage in a high stakes game of chicken with the prosecutor because Swartz wanted to be The Hero and Fight Back Against The Man. He and lawyers forgot two important things however, first - don't bet what you can't afford to lose, second - don't bluff unless you're prepared to be called.

Comment: Re:CFAA & Aaronsw (Score 1) 134

by DerekLyons (#47615489) Attached to: Aaron's Law Is Doomed and the CFAA Is Still Broken

I don't think that people are wanting his actions to be totally legal so much as just having reasonable punishment.

Six months sounds more than reasonable - however Swartz and his lawyers decided that was unreasonable and decided to enage in a high stakes game of chicken with Swartz's freedom on the line because Swartz wanted to be The Hero and Fight Back Against The Man. He and lawyers forgot two important things however, first - don't bet what you can't afford to lose, second - don't bluff unless you're prepared to be called.

Comment: Re:An interesting death spiral (Score 1) 502

by DerekLyons (#47612363) Attached to: Why Morgan Stanley Is Betting That Tesla Will Kill Your Power Company

Right now it is stupid to have any incandescent bulbs in your house. Yet most people still do.

It's stupid to have incandescent bulbs in your house only if if you use enough of them to light your house up like a bloody football stadium for a night game. But most people don't. They have a handful of bulbs on at any given time, and then only for part of the day. They're poster children for electrical consumption because they're small and relatively easily exchanged, but they're not as meaningful overall as the many *other* consumers of electricity in the average house.

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. -- H. L. Mencken

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