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Comment Re:What about the animals? (Score 1) 397

Have you had vegemite? Whole grain breads? Congratulations, you've had brewing by-products. Brewing by-products includes things like yeast cakes which are extremely high in a wide variety of vitamins, some of which are difficult to obtain in other feeds outside of soy (which is getting more and more expensive). The whole grains still contain proteins and carbohydrates, which means they're great animal feed and can be used in whole grain products. I'm not aware that there's ever been any sort of food poisoning or scare traced back to spent grains, and a brief google search reveals none. On top of that, if you're doing something to your grains that makes them poisonous, odds are your beer isn't safe for consumption, either. There really is no need for the FDA to even look into this, as it's effectively been done for centuries with no problems.

Comment You can have all the fun you want... (Score 1) 326

...if only your life is on the line, and not, say, the lives of millions of others all the way down to their great great grand children. Innovation at the cost of safety is great in some fields. After all, the only one dieing is the idiot who blew themself up. But when you accidentally start a meltdown because your "fun" design didn't include all the safety gear you thought it did, I don't have any complaints for having more safety than innovation.

Comment Re:Students are PAYING CUSTOMERS and should demand (Score 3, Interesting) 168

Students can get up to $5500 per year in government aid depending on their need that they do not have to pay back. The government also backs loans at much lower interest rates available elsewhere. Once virtually everyone has access to large amounts of money for college, colleges can easily raise their rate and still have a large volume of students attending - and this is seen by the fact that almost every college raises their tuition and fees far in excess of the rate of inflation every year. Colleges practically bleed money, and very few of them have any semblance of balanced accounting.

Comment It's all economics (Score 1) 531

There are a lot of reasons we haven't gone supersonic with air travel. Sonic booms do things like shatter windows, set off car alarms, drive animals nuts, etc. The concord flights had to wait until they were 100 miles off shore before they would go supersonic, and they were also extremely inefficient, which means extremely expensive. It really is not cost effective for any airline to do supersonic flights right now, although Virgin has designs on a sub-orbital plane that will fly from New York to Paris in something like 2 hours. There are also new airframe bodies that do not produce a sonic boom when they break the speed of sound, but I'm not sure how efficient those are for air travel.

Comment Re:So what is the purpose of this? (Score 1) 226

You should check out just what exactly you do when you distill a drink. Basically, you evaporate all the alcohol out of the mash (which is where the urine and meds are in this), collect it via an inverted funnel at the top which has tubing going through a barrel of cold water. The cold tubing condenses the alcohol vapors, which comes out of the bottom as alcohol. This is basically moonshine at that point, and takes on the flavor of whatever you put it in as it ages for years. Given that the type of sugar usually defines the type of drink you're making, I'm not really sure how this qualifies as "whiskey", though.

Comment What's the big deal? (Score 1) 192

This seems to be the equivalent of bragging about getting increased range in a normal car because you put another fuel tank instead of having a trunk and removed everything else that makes a modern car modern. Like important safety equipment, or air conditioning. I don't get it. Tesla has already done what these guys are trying to do ten times over without sacrificing all of that. And good luck getting through the southern Mexican parts of the highway in that thing. You'll need it.

Herschel Spectroscopy of Future Supernova 21

davecl writes "ESA's Herschel Space Telescope has released its first spectroscopic results. These include observations of VYCMa, a star 50 times as massive as the sun and soon to become a supernova, as well as a nearby galaxy, more distant colliding starburst galaxies and a comet in our own solar system. The spectra show more lines than have ever been seen in these objects in the far-infrared and will allow astronomers to work out the detailed chemistry and physics behind star and planet formation as well as the last stages of stellar evolution before VYCMa's eventual collapse into a supernova. More coverage is available at the Herschel Mission Blog, which I run."

We can found no scientific discipline, nor a healthy profession on the technical mistakes of the Department of Defense and IBM. -- Edsger Dijkstra