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Comment Re:Here it comes... (Score 1) 167

Well, I would say that Sridhar (known as "Mike" on the switchboard) and his friend Narednra (known as "Tim" on the switchboard) who want to be more western world, what else ARE they going to search for to fit in with the rest of us?

Having said that, I only ever recall seeing one bit of bollywood porn, and it was a blooper (don't ask), so maybe it's just not around that much. Of course I might just not be that into that sort of thing and be missing out on a vast cultural experience. Better to use the simplest English description and go from there than sort through all manner of strange things eh?

Submission + - SPAM: Adobe Flash HD-Video GPU Acceleration Guide

Das Capitolin writes: Let's think the first words coming to our minds when reading: Adobe Flash Player. Youtube, Hulu, vimeo, HD videos might be some of them. If you dont understand or relate this words you probably live under a rock or have been out of the game, and by game I mean technology world, for a long time. In our AVIVO Purevideo DXVA HD Acceleration Guide we show you how to use your GPU to playback and enhance many kinds of video formats, normally used on DVDs and Blu-Rays, but not limited to them. The benefit is clear. As long as you can use your graphics card to playback your videos instead of using the CPU, you are doing things easier for your machine, thus consuming less energy and freeing your CPU to do other stuff at the same time.

This was the original idea of the DXVA technology. But what happens to the rest of the content we normally watch at the web? Flash is one of the biggest and more used formats today. Youtube being ranked 4th (by traffic stats) is knocking hard at our doors asking for some attention. Some other sites like Hulu (USA) or vimeo have enormous quantities of traffic also, and it wouldnt be a problem if they werent constantly evolving and offering better quality services. For example, Youtube just went up to 1080p support the last month. But I fear 1080p isnt an easy task for a mid-low CPU, it is? The answer to all this is very simple: DXVA for Adobe Flash Player, and that's what we are testing today in our Adobe Flash GPU Acceleration Guide at Benchmark Reviews.

Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Open Office is there (Score 1) 179

Honestly, the compatibility, scalability, and overall functionality is why I pushed my open source shop to implement an Outlook server.

Before I get flamed, the reason was project/meeting scheduling. Until the new, in-house OSS solution is live, work *still* has to get done, and having to check 5 different calendars to schedule a fucking field install is completely unacceptable to me.

Submission + - Anatomy of a wireless ISP (

An anonymous reader writes: In a lunch at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society, the world's first wireless ISP, or WISP, talks about how he built his ISP. It is a story of grit, hard work, logistical nightmares, frustration, and innovation. His story and what it entailed is captured on video. You can watch or download the video from the Berkman Center’s web site.

Submission + - What department should handle mobile phones? 2

An anonymous reader writes: I am in a mid sized company (200 employees) and our IT department does not currently handle cell phones. Traditional land line phones having been quickly moving into the IT realm with technologies like VOIP but cell phones don't seem as obvious to management. I am having trouble convincing my company that as cell phones are becoming more like computers and less like phones and thus they should be managed by IT. Not only can they pose a risk to our networks but I am worried that if I don't get control of them soon, decisions and contracts will be made that will lock us into a technology dead end or be costly down the road to remedy. To me it seems obvious that mobile phones need to be managed by IT but the longer we wait the bigger the mess will be that I will have to clean up when they eventually do get put in the IT department.

What do you think and what department handles mobile/cell/wireless phones in your company?

Submission + - Google Might Get Into Hosted Gaming Via YouTube (

bizwriter writes: A recent patent application from Google describes a way to provide “the collaborative generation of interactive features for digital videos, and in particular to interactive video annotations enabling control of video playback locations and creation of interactive games.” Get into the description and you find it's about building games on top of video submissions, making it sound that Google plans to extend YouTube site into an associated gaming site.

Submission + - The Coolest Data Center Video Tours (

1sockchuck writes: Ever want to see inside the world's most powerful data centers? Data Center Knowledge has compiled a list of some of the best video tours of data centers, featuring walk-throughs of facilities from Google, Terremark, IBM and several sites highlighted at Slashdot, including the Vegas SuperNAP and the "James Bond Villain" underground data lair in Sweden.

Submission + - Wireless network modded to see through walls ( 1

KentuckyFC writes: "The way radio signals vary in a wireless network can reveal the movement of people behind closed doors, say researchers who have developed a technique called variance-based radio tomographic imaging which processes wireless signals to peer through walls. They've tested the idea with a 34-node wireless network using the IEEE 802.15.4 wireless protocol (the personal area network protocol employed by home automation services such as ZigBee). The researchers say that such a network could be easily distributed by the police or military wanting to determine what's going on inside a building. But such a network, which uses cheap off-the-shelf components, might also be easily deployed by your neighbor or anybody else wanting to monitor movements in your home."

Submission + - Choosing a personal printer for the long haul

The Optimizer writes: "Ask Slashdot: After 16 years of service my laser printer, a NEC Silentwriter 95, is finally wearing its internals out and I need to find a replacement. It's printed over 30,000 pages and survived a half-dozen long-distance moves without giving me any trouble. I believe it's done so well for two reasons. First, it's sturdily built and hails from an era when every fraction of penny didn't have to be cost-cut out of manufacturing, The other reason was its software. Since it supported postscript Level II, it wasn't bound to a specific operating system or hardware platform, so long as a basic postscript level 2 driver was available. A new color laser printer with postscript 3 seems like a logical replacement, and numerous inexpensive printers are available. I'd rather get a smaller, personal-size printer than a heavy workgroup printer. Most of all, I would like it to still be usable and running well with Windows 9, OS X 11, and whatever else we will be using in 2020. Can anyone recommend a brand or series of printers that is built to last and isn't going to be completely dependent on OS specific proprietary drivers?"

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes