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Comment: Bullies (Score 1) 550

This is completely ridiculous. Those attacks need to stop. This bullying needs to stop. This isn't like those anti-#GamerGate people who bully people into silence and do other nasty stuff like spread lies in mainstream media about #GamerGate in order to avoid talking their corruption. I agree that Systemd is on a road to become a feature creep and I don't like that but it's still a very good init system. I personally like Systemd for several reasons. It makes use of cgroups for example. I was very happy to see Debian do, what I considered to be the right action, and switched to Systemd. I understand that there are people who would like to turn clocks back to 70s and do "The UNIX way" but that so called "UNIX way" is broken philosophy that shouldn't be blindly followed. It's a good and noble princible but it stops working when solution needs to be scaled up. It's not delivering "correct and complete" software. Instead it often results in complex and incomplete mess. If you don't like Systemd then fork it and make a better solution or contribute to the project by taking part of it. Or make your own distributions without it. Just don't attack the devs for what they believe is worth doing. Jesus. Rant over.

Comment: Fedora's Partitioning UI (Score 1) 170

by Dekonega (#47865009) Attached to: Fedora To Get a New Partition Manager

I sincerely feel that Fedora's Partitioning UI is ABSOLUTELY HORRIBLE. It was the biggest *huh* and *ugh* when I installed Fedora 19 and 20. It made no sense what so ever. I remember using Anaconda like in early 2000 to install Red Hat 9 and Fedora Core something and that UI worked just fine. The new UI in my opinion only confuses users and is clearly tuned towards formatting everything the HDD might already have such as Windows NT based OS.

OpenSuse has a reasonably good partitioning UI. YAST isn't the best thing out there but gets the job done. Ubuntu had the best one last time I checked. It actually told you everything you needed to know and expressed that with smart well designed visual cues. Ubuntu's partitioning UI isn't imho perfect and it could use an "advanced mode" but so far Ubiquity is the best I've seen around in Linux world. The best "advanced mode" ships with the Debian-installer as it allows some really wicked and truly flexible partitioning schemes to be made.

Comment: Re:Assets and third-party libraries are non-free (Score 1) 81

by Dekonega (#47555739) Attached to: GOG.com Announces Linux Support

Id had to rewrite the Doom 3 engine to eliminate a patented "depth fail" shadow volume processing technique invented by William Bilodeau and Michael Songy of Creative Labs before its source could be released.

Those guys invented nothing. They were allowed to patent mathematics. Carmack's Reverse was independently discovered by John Carmack. He didn't know that the principles of his algorithm, the idea, had been patented. Besides he had an actual implementation of the thing. The version of z-fail in Creative's overly broadly worded patent isn't even a thing. Creative then used this as a leverage to blackmail id Software to include their EAX stuff into the game. This is a yet another good example why software patents need to die. Software patents are killing the economy and poisoning the academic circles. Copyright is sufficient protection.

Comment: TV/Movie-Widescreens fcksck! (Score 1) 304

by Dekonega (#47083635) Attached to: Is LG's New Ultra Widescreen Display Better Than "Normal" 4K?

I want 24' IPS 4:3s or 16:10s. Especially 16:10 is a beautiful widescreen aspect ratio. It's very good for working on a computer. 16:9 is only good for watching movies and perhaps some games which are in a movie aspect ratio. Try doing work with one and you'll get frustrated and annoyed. Even if you turn it 90 degrees it's still horrible. 16:10 for life! (If you absolutely need widescreen). Now excuse me, I need more beer.

Comment: Interesting (Score 2) 72

by Dekonega (#47041965) Attached to: Mysterious Disease May Be Carried by the Wind

Hmm... that's pretty interesting. I hope they can find the source and I do hope that some kind of Chinese factory isn't the cause because that would make the relationship between the two countries worse. But on the otherhand the China's leaders have been pretty public about the environmental issues lately. If the cause is indeed in China (although the researchers in the article doubted this) there's a good chance that this might offer the kind of catalyst to make Japanese industries more invested in helping Chinese industry to be more environmental friendly and for example share the green technology.

Comment: Re:The Democrats killed Net Neutrality !! (Score 1) 182

by Dekonega (#47025125) Attached to: FCC Votes To Consider Next Round of 'Net Neutrality' Rules

Some guy who seemed to be educated in this matter wrote ( https://plus.google.com/103831... ) that the republicans wanted to stall the situation and keep it as it is where no solution can be reached which allows the ISPs to misbehave while the FCC cannot enforce the rules. Democrats voted to open the conversation for public and they're playing a bit dangerous game where they're betting that public will now go and comment and give their piece of mind at http://www.90so.tv/fccproposal and that way prevent the proposed "fast lanes", and get the ISPs reclassified under tier-2. But if that fails then the real shitstorm begins.

With that said I didn't quite understand why they cannot do so in the first place. In 2002 when they changed the classification to tier-1 it wasn't a big deal to them. But then I saw this article at Arstechnica...

http://arstechnica.com/tech-po...

Yeah... gg USA... gg...

Comment: IMHO (Score 1) 338

by Dekonega (#46868929) Attached to: To Save the Internet We Need To Own the Means of Distribution

"Is the Internet essential infrastructure? Should local governments step in to preserve equality of access?"

Absolutely. As for the second question... Presuming that government will not start using the network to their own purposes. I'd say yes. But no matter who's in charge of the internet connections, there are always going to be organizations that will want to control it. Best way would be ensure in legal ways that there are lots of service providers, and laying cables on ground is cheap. Power should be in hands of the many rather than in hands of the few and selected.

Comment: My answer to the question (Score 1) 452

by Dekonega (#46727829) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Start With Linux In the Workplace?

I'd suggest the Fedora 20 and Gnome 3.10 as a desktop environment. I'd normally suggest to install Debian with Gnome or KDE, but Debian Jessie is only a year away, and current stable Debian is horribly out of date with the horrible Gnome 3.4 release.

As for tip for introducing Linux to people... It's important to make a clean break from Windows instead of trying to imitate Windows using for example KDE and skin it to look like Windows. That allows the people to open their minds for the fact that they're now dealing with something new and different. It might cause attitude problems at first. But those attitude problems are less problematic than the "why this doesn't work the way it works on this new version of Windows" problems when they're talking about the Linux you've installed. (I've noticed that quite many people equal OS with Windows and anything else doesn't exist in their minds even if you explain to them that GNU/Linux is a different operating system and that there are several operating systems in the world). It's also easier to tech and explain them things around the system.

It's also important not to lie about what they're using. Renaming desktop shortcut icon to Firefox into "Internet Explorer" only serves to cause confusion in people. This is especially bad since they're expecting to see "a familiar user interface" but when they see something completely different they start thinking that "I must have done something wrong" and that's something you want to avoid at any cost.

I personally use KDE as my desktop environment but, as much as it pains me, I'd never recommend KDE to a somebody who is a new Linux user. KDE just has too many things to adjust and it's unreliable desktop to use in the hands of the beginners. KDE is a powerful collection of tools no doubt about that but it has several things that work against it. KDE doesn't have a good reliable native web browser at the moment. Closest thing to that is Rekonq but it's too unstable and young project. Konqueror is also horribly out of date and it's web-browsing functionality is subpar when compared to other browsers. Opera doesn't care about their Linux port anymore but it's the closest good Qt based browser KDE has to offer. KDE also doesn't have a easy to use capable suite of office applications. If you think that Calligra is good enough, then you're lying to yourself. Skype for Linux uses Qt and is probably the best native application on the Qt side of things. Well, there's also KINO. KDE has three to four different native text editors that ship within the KDE suite, each with different levels of functionality, an tons of duplicated functionality. KDE in general has tons of dublicated functionality. Oh and we should probably talk about the KDE Wallet someday too... KDE is a very good desktop for power users but unsuitable for beginners. KDE's graphic design is also questionable because integration of components fails to meet some of the basic standards, and the Plasma is still a piece of junk. Everyday I hope that KDE project would reintroduce, bad as it was, the Kicker, back into the package. It was just way more reliable. I like KDE because it's flexible desktop but that flexibility is a very negative thing when a beginner starts to use Linux. For beginners KDE only serves as a demonstration that you can do whatever they want to do if and when they later require more functionality.

Gnome 3 as a desktop might be shit and Gnome Shell have some questionable design choises but there are several things that work for it's benefit when it's introduced to beginners or elderly. Gnome 3 has a limited amount of things to adjust in plain sight, Gnome has several native web browsers which are very capable, secure, and up to date (Epiphany (Gnome Web), Firefox and Chrome), native fully functional easy to use office suite in form of OpenOffice and LibreOffice, and let's not forget that the best image editor at the moment on Free Software camp is GIMP and it's a native GTK application. And Gnome 3.10 provides one basic application per one task to do. There are exactly one basic text editor, one basic photo library application, one basic music library application, one basic photo editor, and so on. This makes Gnome 3 easier to explain and to teach to people. Gnome 3 also comes with excellent documentation and helper applications with clean and easy to understand tutorials for everything. Gnome 3's Keychain application also better and is more transparent to user, exactly like comparable software in the Mac OS X.

Sorry about the fact that this became a rant about desktops. It wasn't my intention.

Comment: Re:Fun Fact about IBM (Score 1) 195

by Dekonega (#46187123) Attached to: IBM Looking To Sell Its Semiconductor Business

IBM helped the Nazis with the punchcard technology used to keep track of prisoners in concentration camps during WWII:

Not IBM itself but its german daughter subsidary at the nazi germany. Parent company probably did knew what their subsidary was doing but since it was profitable for them they didn't ask unnecessary questions. Officially the machines were used in a similar manner in all over the world to count population. There was nothing suspicious about that. I mean, it was a complete surprice for the allied troops to even find out that there were such work camps in existance. Retropespectively IBM did wrong though. And its undeniable that they had a role in the big picture. But stating that IBM directly took part in the genocide by helping nazis and knew about that on top of that too is just stating too much. Where's the evidence to support that?

+ - An open letter to the management of Slashdot. 14

Submitted by onyxruby
onyxruby (118189) writes "I have been watch for some time now as Slashdot has started beta testing a new version of the website. As you are well aware the new site would constitute a complete change to the look, interface and functionality of Slashdot.org.

Change happens, and for those of us who work with technology for a living it is the only constant. Change is a process and in and of itself is not a bad thing when it offers improvement. Unfortunately the change that has been offered negatively impacts the look, interface and most importantly the functionality of Slashdot.
Many people have had trouble reverting back to the classic interface. The new interface simply does not offer the functionality of the old. Things like statistics, comments and layout are very difficult to find. You have a community that lives and breathes data and want to know their data. How is my comment ranked, how many people responded – it’s really all about the dialogue. Can I get the information that I want in a readily digestible format?

As you’re well aware the new site does not offer the very thing that people come here for. This in and of itself is not why your community has organized a boycott of Beta. The boycott was originated because the new version will be implemented whether the community wants it or not.

I want to explain why this change has gone down people’s throats about as well as Windows 8’s Metro interface. The reason has absolutely nothing to do with the interface and everything to do with the perception that the editors and management of Slashdot appear to have.

The message that has been consistently handed down is that we are “your audience”. We are not your “your audience” we are your product. People do not come to Slashdot for the news stories, there are untold other sites that provide those as well as professional and original writing about them. People come here for the community of insiders from across the industry.

Please respect the community and stop what you’re doing. You have commented that you don’t want to maintain two code bases. Your community works in the industry and understands this, which leads many to suggest you abandon the new code base entirely so that you are only maintaining once code base. Tell us what your trying to accomplish and I would imagine that a wide range of experts would be more than willing to help you meet your goals."

"Probably the best operating system in the world is the [operating system] made for the PDP-11 by Bell Laboratories." - Ted Nelson, October 1977

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