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Submission + - Wikipedia Denies DMCA Take-Down Request Because a Monkey Took the Selfie 1

An anonymous reader writes: Back in 2011, an English photographer went to Indonesia on a photography shoot and had his camera temporarily stolen by a black macaque monkey. While the camera was in its possession, the monkey took various pictures, including a selfie that went viral and landed on Wikimedia Commons under the public domain. The photographer insisted that he owns the copyright and filed a DMCA take-down request, but Wikimedia denied the request, arguing, "To claim copyright, the photographer would have had to make substantial contributions to the final image, and even then, they'd only have copyright for those alterations, not the underlying image. This means that there was no one on whom to bestow copyright, so the image falls into the public domain." Wikimedia's rejection of the monkey selfie DMCA take-down request is recorded in its first ever transparency report issued on Wednesday.

Submission + - Do NDAs trump the law? Florida cops say it does when using their stingray (

schwit1 writes: Police in Florida have offered a startling excuse for having used a controversial “stingray” cell phone tracking gadget 200 times without ever telling a judge: the device’s manufacturer made them sign a non-disclosure agreement that they say prevented them from telling the courts.

The shocking revelation, uncovered by the American Civil Liberties Union, came during an appeal over a 2008 sexual battery case in Tallahassee in which the suspect also stole the victim’s cell phone. Using the stingray — which simulates a cell phone tower in order to trick nearby mobile devices into connecting to it and revealing their location — police were able to track him to an apartment.

Submission + - Nasa Finds Clues that there's Flowing Water on Mars (

bobstreo writes: There’s no definitive answer yet, but astronomers examining the question have honed in on ”recurring slope lineae” or RSL for short. These are dark lines that are observed moving down the slopes of some Martian mountains as temperatures on the surface rise. Some scientists studying Mars have suggested that these flows might be caused by saltwater containing a iron sulfate solution to keep it from freezing in Martian temperatures.
Mars Orbiter Snaps Pic Of Dramatic Crater Blast Zone Brid-Aine Parnell Brid-Aine Parnell Contributor
Mars May Have Had A Habitable Lake Billions Of Years Ago Alex Knapp Alex Knapp Forbes Staff

Now new images taken by the have shown new clues that yes, these RSL do in fact contain flowing water. This comes from two new reports that focused on the minerals left behind by the RSL. While the images didn’t find any signs of salt or water, they did find iron-containing minerals that weren’t found on mountains without RSL.

Submission + - Why P-values cannot tell you if a hypothesis is correct (

ananyo writes: P values, the 'gold standard' of statistical validity, are not as reliable as many scientists assume. Critically, they cannot tell you the odds that a hypothesis is correct. A feature in Nature looks at why, if a result looks too good to be true, it probably is, despite an impressive-seeming P value.

Submission + - Best device for handwriting recognition and simple sketching?

Defenestrar writes: Schools may have stopped teaching cursive, but the tech crowd has long been asking about the obsolescence of typing. Digital note software is already here, as the increasing prevalence of OneNote and our old discussions of Unix software equivalencies demonstrate. But I, for one, would like to take notes and sketch diagrams without juggling input devices.

Touchscreens might be on their way, but graphic pads and pen mice are here today. What do my fellow readers use for their handwriting recognition and sketching needs? Are there any options of sufficient quality for a low enough cost to become standard office equipment issue? And does anyone remember which sci-fi author coined the phrase: light pen?

Submission + - Nanoparticles heated by radio waves switch on genes in mice (

ananyo writes: Researchers have used radio waves to remotely activate engineered insulin-producing genes in mice. In the long term, the work could lead to medical procedures in which patients’ genes are triggered on demand.
The researchers coated coated iron oxide nanoparticles with antibodies that bind to a modified version of a temperature-sensitive ion channel. They injected these particles into tumors grown under the skins of mice, then heated the nanoparticles with low-frequency radio waves. The nanoparticles heated the ion channel, activating it and allowing calcium to flow into cells. The influx of calcium switched on an engineered calcium-sensitive gene that produces insulin (abstract).

The Internet

Submission + - Porn sites sue internet regulator over .xxx web ad (

Defenestrar writes: Solicit the industry or not, you may desire to know that some owners of pornographic websites have raised dirty allegations about the advent of the .xxx domain in what may turn into a legal battle touching the authority of ICANN in what could be a personal way.

Submission + - Factory to make biodiesel from chicken fat. (

telekon writes: "Tyson foods has finally found a use for chicken fat and leftover food grease that isn't McNuggets — they've partnered with Syntroleum to produce biodiesel from the stuff. Their first plant in Louisiana will be able to churn out 75 million gallons a year. The question is, will the exhaust smell like fried chicken? The Wall Street Journal has an article here, and NPR has a story here."

Submission + - SPAM: Royal Navy website hacked

tuXx writes: The Royal Navy's website has been hacked by a suspected Romanian hacker known as TinKode.

The hacker gained access to the website on 5 November using a common attack method known as SQL injection.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - TSA unveils backscatter tech to reveal all (

bossanovalithium writes: Just as we thought all the good peep shows in Times Square shut down, TSA rolled out its new Advanced Imaging Technology scanners in 65 airports throughout America. Backscatter technology takes body scanning machines to a whole new level with imaging technology that can see through a person's clothes to reveal any metal bombs, shanks, guns, or a dangerous pair of tatas.

So realistic, these images reveal everything from crack to crevice, and certainly leave nothing to the imagination. Regardless of whether or not this is necessary, meaningless security theatre, or perhaps just a plain old violation of privacy rights, this risque technology got us thinking: what if these pictures leak? Are backscatter images the newest version of the celebrity sex tape or the naughty text


Submission + - Scientists overclock people's brains (

arshadk writes: "Applying a tiny electrical current to the brain could make you better at learning maths, according to Oxford University scientists."
"The effects were not short-lived, either. When the volunteers whose performance improved was re-tested six months later, the benefits appear to have persisted."

Books Investor Sues Company For Lack Of Profit 181

The board of claims that it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, than to make money on the domain name, but an angry shareholder disagrees. From the article: "James Solakian filed the lawsuit in Delaware's Chancery Court against the board of for breaching their duty by refusing to sell the site or run the company in a profitable way. The lawsuit cites a valuation done by a potential purchaser that estimated could be worth more than, which recently sold for more than $100 million."

Heroic Engineer Crashes Own Vehicle To Save a Life 486

scottbomb sends in this feel-good story of an engineer-hero, calling it "one of the coolest stories I've read in a long time." "A manager of Boeing's F22 fighter-jet program, Innes dodged the truck, then looked back to see that the driver was slumped over the wheel. He knew a busy intersection was just ahead, and he had to act fast. Without consulting the passengers in his minivan — 'there was no time to take a vote' — Innes kicked into engineer mode. 'Basic physics: If I could get in front of him and let him hit me, the delta difference in speed would just be a few miles an hour, and we could slow down together,' Innes explained."

No problem is so formidable that you can't just walk away from it. -- C. Schulz