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+ - I ran to the Flying Saurcer in Iran->

Submitted by ChronoFish
ChronoFish (948067) writes "NPR (http://www.npr.org/2011/03/21/134727603/iran-unveils-unmanned-flying-saucer) the FARS news agency (http://english.farsnews.com/newstext.php?nn=8912250816) and host of others are reporting on Iran claiming to have release "the first real" flying saucer. Except there is one problem. The "release" photos are from a move (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/03/iran-unveils-flying-saucer-using-old-b-movie-stock-photo/72696/)"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:America has jumped the shark (Score 1) 947

by DeCappa (#35035730) Attached to: Teachers Back Away From Evolution In Class

Funny you classify a theory as truth. It was once known as truth that the world was flat by scientists. That truth was "known" for many years before proven to be false. What about the earth being the center of the universe, wasn't that "truth" also? How about that all matter was made up of electrons (and only electrons)?

Scientists – well, Greek philosophers using scientific methods to be more precise – have known that the Earth was a sphere since before the time of Christ (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spherical_Earth)

You hold a common misconception over the meaning and significance of a scientific theory:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions#Evolution
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Objections_to_evolution#Status_as_a_theory

Comment: Problem of motivation... (Score 1) 997

by DeCappa (#34871038) Attached to: Are 10-11 Hour Programming Days Feasible?

As many have said, longer hours do not necessarily translate into less bugs, more features or a better product in a reduced period of time. Changing processes if they are broken and motivating employees to work more effectively are going to be better bets in the long run (and probably even in the short term). Brute-forcing software development is not sustainable.

On the subject of motivation, you can point your boss to a couple Dan Pink videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc (short version)
http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation.html (long version)

I am not sure what "space" you are developing in or what processes you use in your software development, but it may be worth considering Agile processes if you are not currently using them. They are not panacea, but if implemented properly they can bring some gains in efficiency and the effectiveness of the programmers you have now at the hours they are working.

Programming

Are 10-11 Hour Programming Days Feasible? 997

Posted by timothy
from the what-share-of-the-company-is-he-offering? dept.
drc37 writes "My current boss asked me what I thought of asking all employees to work 10-11 hour days until the company is profitable. He read something from Joel Spolsky that said the best way to get new customers is to add new features. Anyways, we are a startup with almost a year live. None of the employees have ownership/stock and all are salary. Salaries are at normal industry rates. What should I say to him when we talk about this again?"
Hardware Hacking

First PlayStation 3 Custom Firmware Created 269

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the you-bought-it dept.
Stoobalou writes "Hot on the heels of the discovery of the the PlayStation 3 private root key, and its subsequent leakage by iPhone hacker Geohot, the first custom firmware for the formerly impenetrable console has been released. A code wrangler known only as Kakaroto reckons he has created the world's first custom firmware for the popular console — although if you're expecting it to help you play pirated games, you might be a little disappointed."
Space

Ikaros Spacecraft Successfully Propelled In Space 229

Posted by timothy
from the best-place-for-it-really dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Japan's IKAROS spacecraft has already successfully deployed the first solar sail in space, but today it made the only first that really matters: it successfully captured the sun's rays with its 3,000-square-foot sail and used the energy to speed its way through space. Each photon of light exerts 0.0002 pounds of pressure on the 3,000-square-foot sail, and the steady stream of solar exposure has succeeded in propelling the nearly 700-pound drone."
Wine

Wine 1.2 Released 427

Posted by Soulskill
from the pop-the-cork dept.
David Gerard writes "Stuck with that one Windows app you can't get rid of? Rejoice — Wine 1.2 is officially released! Apart from running pretty much any Windows application on Unix better than 1.0 (from 2008), major new features include 64-bit support, bi-directional text, and translation into thirty languages. And, of course, DirectX 9 is well-supported and DirectX 10 is getting better. Packages should hit the distros over the weekend, or you can get the source now."
Power

DARPA To Turn Humans Into Batteries 183

Posted by samzenpus
from the electric-personality dept.
DARPA is working on a project that will convert energy from the human body to power a variety of military gadgets. From the article: "Obviously, our bodies generate heat — thermal energy. They also produce vibrations when we move — kinetic energy. Both forms of energy can be converted into electricity. Anantha Chandrakasan, an MIT electrical engineering professor, who is working on the problem with a former student named Yogesh Ramadass, says the challenge is to harvest adequate amounts of power from the body and then efficiently direct it to the device that needs it." If I remember the movie correctly, this didn't turn out so well for the humans.
Networking

Millions of Home Routers Are Hackable 179

Posted by kdawson
from the pre-black-hat-frenzy dept.
Julie188 writes "Craig Heffner, a researcher with Maryland-based security consultancy Seismic, plans to release a software tool at the Black Hat conference later this month that he says could be used on about half the existing models of home routers, including most Linksys, Dell, and Verizon FiOS or DSL versions. The tool apparently exploits the routers through DNS rebinding. While this technique has been discussed for 15 years or more, Heffner says, 'It just hasn't been put together like this before.'" Notebooks.com has a list of routers tested and some advice on securing vulnerable routers.
The Media

Murdoch's UK Paywall a Miserable Failure 428

Posted by timothy
from the sorry-rupert dept.
David Gerard writes "As part of his war against free, Rupert Murdoch put the Times and Sunday Times of London behind a paywall. Michael Wolff of Newser asks how that's working out for him. You can guess: miserable failure: 'Not only is nobody subscribing to the website, but subscribers to the paper itself — who have free access to the site — are not going beyond the registration page. It's an empty world.' Not that this wasn't entirely predictable." Update: 07/17 01:41 GMT by T : Frequent contributor Peter Wayner writes skeptically that the Newsday numbers should be looked at with a grain of salt: "I believe they were charging $30/month for the electronic edition and $25/month for the dead tree edition which also offered free access to the electronic edition. In essence, you had to pay an extra $5 to avoid getting your lawn littered with paper. The dead tree edition gets much better ad rates and so it is worth pushing. It's a mistake to see the raw numbers and assume that the paywall failed."
Networking

Irish Gov't Invests In Color-Coded Fiber Optics 129

Posted by timothy
from the can-envy-without-wanting dept.
c0mpliant writes "The Irish government has invested a further €5 million, after already having invested €5 million one year ago, in a new system of fiber optics which heralds an era of virtualization of fiber networks, using color coding to enable multiple fiber providers to serve businesses and homes, often on a single strand of fiber. The technology, which has already sparked interest from companies such as BT and IBM, is already in its first phase and boasts an impressive 2.5 terabytes capacity, double the capacity of the London phone system. The company behind the technology, Intune Technology, is comprised of a group of ex-UCD photonics researchers and has been around since 1999 and are based in Dublin. The project is set to be completed by 2020."
Displays

3M Says Its Multi-Touch System Means Almost No Lag 120

Posted by timothy
from the so-why-don'tcha-marry-it? dept.
jonniee writes "3M has rolled out a 22-inch digital display capable of 20-finger multi-touch input with less than 6 millisecond response time. The monitor incorporates 3M's Projected Capacitive Technology based on mutual capacitance operation theory. The result produces a silky smooth response that has almost no lag in execution."

What this country needs is a good five dollar plasma weapon.

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