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+ - Linux desktop users more pragmatic now or just demonstrating inertia?->

Submitted by David W. White
David W. White (1241890) writes "Years ago ago those of us who used any *nix desktop (“every morning when you wake up, the house is a little different”) were seen as willing to embrace change and spend hours tinkering and configuring until we got new desktop versions to work the way we wanted, while there was an opposite perception of desktop users over in the Mac world (“it just works”) and the Windows world (“its a familiar interface”). However, a recent article in Datamation concludes that “for better or worse, they [Linux desktop users] know what they want — a classic desktop — and the figures consistently show that is what they are choosing in far greater numbers than GNOME, KDE, or any other single graphical interface.” Has the profile of the Linux desktop user changed to a more pragmatic one? Or is it just the psychology of user inertia at work, when one considers the revolt against changes in the KDE, GNOME, UNITY and Windows 8 interface in recent times?"
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Comment: Re:Only voluntary for a few days .. (Score 1) 32

by David W. White (#36383000) Attached to: Cybersecurity and the Internet Economy
Dweller: I've done a lot of research in this area. Some time ago I was exploring the idea of using laws and financial incentives to coerce or "force" developers/companies to implement best practices and canvassed a few hundred firms to get their take. The overwhelming response was that they didn't think it was a good idea, some thought it would drive them out of business, stifle competition, etc. Then I came across the full green paper from Dept of Comm. before reading this on /. In light of what happened to Sony etc, I wonder what would be the response now, if I asked the same questions again?

Comment: Re:Speed (Score 1) 237

by David W. White (#32798516) Attached to: Compiz Project Releases C++ Based v0.9.0
Wowsers, on the face of things, I would doubt that, since C is by design faster that C++. I guess over time though with a little optimization here and there we might gain speed improvement in Compiz. I used to use Beryl with Knoppix years ago before it became stable. I had to manually configure conf files a couple of time. I changed to Compiz when I switched distros. Compiz used to crash at first but its pretty stable on my system now.

Comment: Re:Objects... (Score 1) 237

by David W. White (#32798444) Attached to: Compiz Project Releases C++ Based v0.9.0
I understand, but for speed I expect that C++ still outperforms Java, and while C should outperform both of them, C doesn't feature encapsulation, polymorphism and all the other goodies that OOP provides. Why would you want to break encapsulation? Apart from one article I saw in the ACM journal about a year or so ago, every other paper I have read showed that OOP programming was more effective that programming without it (except for those few highly specialized areas where you have to use specialized languages).
Movies

Why Are Video Game Movies So Awful? 385

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-just-uwe dept.
An article at CNN discusses why big screen interpretations of video games, even successful ones, often fail to succeed at the box office. Quoting: "The problem with successfully adapting video games into hit Hollywood spin-offs may lie in the way in which stories for both mediums are designed and implemented. Game makers chasing the dream of playing George Lucas or Steven Spielberg will always strive to coax human emotion and convincing drama from increasingly photorealistic virtual elements. The Hollywood machine, in its endless chase for big bucks, can't help but exploit the latest hit interactive outing, often failing to realize it's often a specific gameplay mechanic, psychological meme or technical feature that makes the title so compelling. Both sides may very well continue to look down in disdain on the work that the opposite is doing, which can doom any collaborative efforts. But where the two roads truly diverge is in the way stories are fundamentally told. Films offer a single, linear tale that's open to individual interpretation, whereas games are meant to be experienced differently and in a multitude of ways by every player." On a related note, reader OrangeMonkey11 points out that an 8-minute short has showed up online that appears part of a pitch for a potential Mortal Kombat reboot movie. Hit the link below to take a look.
Ubuntu

+ - Ignore geeks if you'll want to go mainstream?

Submitted by David W. White
David W. White (1241890) writes "In his May 5, 2010 article in Wired, Charlie Sorrel discusses "How to Make an iPad-Beating Tablet" and states that what Apple created in the form of the iPad was a device that ordinary people could use. He implied that what users want in a tablet is a good OS built around the tablet and not just an extension of OSes previously written for mouse/keyboard support, and hardware that focuses on supporting apps and preserving battery life. In the comments following the article, several posters suggested that "building a better tablet than the iPad" would involve creating a device running a tablet os and apps that just work, even if the nerds and geeks hate it, since they are just a small portion in the market.

Earlier on /., some posters observed that Ubuntu used to be a favorite among nerds when it was fairly new and geeky, but as it gained mainstream adoption, some nerds/geeks started to hate it because using it no longer put them in an exclusive elite.

In order to be successful, should developers of future device/os/apps ignore the opinions of nerds/geeks and instead pander to the needs of the wider (non-geek) population, or are geeks/nerds still are a force to be reckoned with? On the other hand, aren't geeks/nerds at the very root of the success of the many open source projects and the open community that support them?

The wired article is at http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/05/how-to-make-an-ipad-beating-tablet/#ixzz0n6339Kmq"

Comment: 10.04 - Best Ubuntu Yet! (Score 2, Informative) 319

by David W. White (#32075316) Attached to: Next Ubuntu Linux To Be a Maverick
I went against my earlier decision to wait a few weeks after the official release, and upgraded the night 10.04 came out. For the first time since I'm using Ubuntu from 7.04, nothing broke! I mean - network, virtual box, mail everything still worked. My only problem was getting use to the placement of the control box on the left instead of on the right. In terms of speed, I haven't seen any visible improvement in startup, but shutdown occurs in way less time than 9.10. This is the best Ubuntu yet!

Comment: Re:Digital watches. (Score 1) 244

by David W. White (#31998568) Attached to: The Big Technical Mistakes of History
[That the world is round has been known since antiquity. "The world is flat" is sort of a meta-myth: a mythical belief that people used to believe a myth, when in fact they didn't.] Yes, you're correct. This was written approx. 2163 years before Christopher Columbus was even born (c.712 BC)- Isaiah 40:22 states "KJV: Isaiah 40:22. It is he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof are as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent to dwell in:
" in my bible.

It is better to give than to lend, and it costs about the same.

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