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Comment: Why not abstract the problem further? (Score 1) 119

by scorp1us (#47420753) Attached to: Will Google's Dart Language Replace Javascript? (Video)

Problem: browsers only run JS, which has it's virtues and warts.
Solution: have a plug-in scripting engine where you can use any language, and let the developers choose their set of virtues and warts.

There is no reason why we can't develop a plugin interface, and have other languages up and working in short order. Python would be great. Just include .py file instead of .js and have that in the interpreter. With a common shared DOM object, you can keep existing JS and transition to your language of choice.

Comment: Platforms with policies against amateurism (Score 1) 482

by tepples (#47416715) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software
The problem comes when computing platforms have policies against programming at an amateur level. Platforms like iOS require purchase and renewal of a certificate before you can even run software you wrote on a machine you own. Video game consoles are even worse; even professionals new to the field may have trouble getting a devkit.

Comment: Re:another language shoved down your throat (Score 1) 388

by ConceptJunkie (#47416647) Attached to: Python Bumps Off Java As Top Learning Language

For example, when adding some new code I will often put it at the beginning of the line (ie with no indent) so I can see it more clearly whilst coding (usually this is for temporary tracing lines), and only indent it before commit.

I do that in C++ all the time, especially when it's something I don't intend to keep. This is definitely something that you can't do in Python, but that doesn't keep me from liking it.

Comment: Experience as a proxy (Score 1) 482

by tepples (#47416633) Attached to: Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

Experience and training is not very important as long as you know how to write good code that's efficient and makes sense to others.

Except hiring managers trend to use the former as a proxy for the latter. They want to call previous employers to verify that a candidate's code works and makes sense.

Comment: Re:another language shoved down your throat (Score 1) 388

by ConceptJunkie (#47416621) Attached to: Python Bumps Off Java As Top Learning Language

With Python, on the other hand, I'm actually more likely to have an error in the indenting, because there's no easy way to see how many blocks I'm terminating when I outdent by an arbitrary amount.

I've never really had that problem, but then I always break up code into reasonable sized functions so the nesting doesn't get too deep. Perhaps that's what you need to change.

Comment: Re: another language shoved down your throat (Score 1) 388

by ConceptJunkie (#47416561) Attached to: Python Bumps Off Java As Top Learning Language

I used Pascal for almost all of my CS courses (but this was in the mid 80s). I got my first job as a C programmer with no formal C experience, but that wasn't a problem, and I never had any problems adapting to new languages during my career as needed. I like some languages more than others, but I can get the job done in anything needed with a short learning curve. I've done mostly C++, which I enjoy, and picked up Python on my own a couple years ago, which I love. I wouldn't call myself a Python expert by any stretch, but I could become one in short order if the need arose. It's all about the programming: Thinking logically, breaking tasks down in discrete steps that do the right thing, knowing what can go wrong. The language is just syntax. It might make some things easier and some things harder, but they're all doable.

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