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Comment: Different definition of "retire" (Score 1) 323

by DaveAtFraud (#46782345) Attached to: I expect to retire ...

I prefer to think of retirement as when I don't need to work in order to be able to afford a comfortable lifestyle. Approaching that point now. A couple more good years from the stock market and work becomes optional; not necessary. On the other hand, I actually enjoy doing software development and may keep working for quite some time after I "retire." The only obstacle I see is that a lot of managers can't deal with having someone working for them who doesn't desperately need the job and is therefore not willing to be treated like s**t.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:Nothing new here (Score 2) 226

by DaveAtFraud (#46763693) Attached to: How 'DevOps' Is Killing the Developer

Seen this many many times before. Cheap companies that have lots of developers and are too cheap to hire experienced admins... or an IT shop that thinks they can have the IT guys program instead of hiring proper developers. "hey, you work with computers, you guys can all do the same stuff, right?" Wrong.

While I have known developers that can sysadmin, and admins that can program... they are the exception not the rule. Quality suffers when you force people into jobs they are not qualified for. Companies know this, and they simply don't care as long as the managers think they are saving money.

If you think the sysadmin who can program or the programmer who can admin a system is bad, you should have seen what happened when they gave Visual Basic to a subject matter expert (SME) and said, "You can program!" Agggghhhhhh!!!!!!!!

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:We'll need more 911 operators (Score 2) 184

by DaveAtFraud (#46739681) Attached to: The Case For a Safer Smartphone

So people do still buy phones to make calls? I thought it was all about the "smart" stuff nowadays. Or was that the actual joke? :)

I take it that you don't drive very much. Still lots of people yakking away on their cell phone and oblivious to traffic around them. I especially like the ones who are so wrapped up in their conversation that they don't notice the light has changed and glare at you if you honk your horn at them with a look of "Can't you see I'm busy with my conversation!" There's a reason why a lot people have a bumper sticker that says, "Shut up, hang up and drive."

Comment: We'll need more 911 operators (Score 2) 184

by DaveAtFraud (#46738275) Attached to: The Case For a Safer Smartphone

911 Operator: "911. What's your emergency?"

Sobbing voice: "I just can't take it anymore. I need someone to talk to."

911 Operator: "That's OK ma'am. I'm here to talk to you. What's your location?"

Simpering voice: "I'm stuck in traffic on the intersate. It seems like hours since I talked to anyone and my phone won't let me call anyone but you."

911 Operator: "You'll be fine ma'am. We're trained to deal with cell phone withdrawl victims. A nice highway patrol officer is on his way to talk to you in person. How long have it been since you made a phone call ma'am?"

Anguished response: "I don't know. I left the office at 5:00 and talked to BFF until I got in my car but the phone dropped the call as soon as I started the engine. What time is it now?"

911 Operator: "It's now 5:15 you poor dear. You've been without cell phone contact for at least 10 minutes. I'll send the paramedics as well as the highway patrol."

Comment: Re:Never drink water! (Score 1) 285

by DaveAtFraud (#46588121) Attached to: I prefer my peppers ...

Thanks for the chemistry lesson. I've always been pretty successful with beer (not wine). Wasn't sure whether it was the lower acidity or lack of carbonation. Folks who pass on alcoholic drinks say that sodas work for them. Thoughts?

Sounds like a good reason to switch to gin and tonnic the next time I'm out for Indian food.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Never drink water! (Score 3, Informative) 285

by DaveAtFraud (#46576107) Attached to: I prefer my peppers ...

Water is one of the WORST things you can have if you find food to be too hot. Capsaician is an oily substance (long carbon chain). By drinking water you spread the oil and that makes it seem even hotten. Best slternatives are things that absorb the capsaician such as starcy foods like bread, rice or potatoes or acidic beverages like fruit juices, beer, etc. that disolve the oil. I've heard milk also works but somehow milk and spicy food doesn't sound good to me.

One of the things that makes hot "buffalo wings" so hot is chicken wings are fatty so the fat from the chicken wings coats your mouth and holds the capsaician there. I like hot spicy food but found that out the hard way when I tried the hottest wings on the menu at a Buffalo Wild Wings. Tasted good initially but then the heat just stayed in my mouth. Only time I haven't been able to finish something because it was too hot.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:You left out... (Score 1) 199

by DaveAtFraud (#46528093) Attached to: A Call For Rollbacks To Previous Versions of Software

Packages A and B both depend on shared library C. A critical bug is discovered in package A that requires a change to library C. Package B releases an update to stay compatible with library C. It turns out that the update to B doesn't work. There is no way to revert B to the previous version since this also requires reverting library C and package A to the version with the critical bug.

This sort of thing is why commercial apps try to avoid using system shared libraries where practical. The issue is that you just never know what sort of crappy system you're going to be dropped into. Bundling as much as you can limits the pain a lot, and the cost is just space (and time when downloading, if relevant).

Of course, if nobody ever shipped buggy updates and never broke backward compatibility, you wouldn't need this sort of thing. But on Planet Earth... <sigh>

I still remember the days of "DLL hell" when everyone shipping Windows products included their own version of various, supposedly shared DLLs. The problem was the first one loaded was expected to work with the others which didn't happen since it didn't have the right customizations. Yeah, that approach worked really well.

The problem with avoiding shared libraries is that the onus for keeping up with updates to the shared libraries transfers to the application developer. You still run into the same problem as my example; just the immediate consequences are hidden. If "B" builds in or statically links to an old version of the library, there is still the possibility that there will be a critical update to the library and it's now up to the application developer to re-build it in, test the new build and release the update. It's possible that the critical bug is in a part of a library their application doesn't use but we're now relying on the application developer to make that determination.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: You left out... (Score 2) 199

by DaveAtFraud (#46518331) Attached to: A Call For Rollbacks To Previous Versions of Software

Shared dependencies:

Packages A and B both depend on shared library C. A critical bug is discovered in package A that requires a change to library C. Package B releases an update to stay compatible with library C. It turns out that the update to B doesn't work. There is no way to revert B to the previous version since this also requires reverting library C and package A to the version with the critical bug.

Testing:

Each old reversion point for any sort of shared library means that every package that is dependent on that library has to be fully tested with each version of the shared library. Add in multiple shared libraries and the test case tree becomes very bushy since all permutations and combinations of the shared libraries must be tested.

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:Not that much more dystopian... (Score 4, Funny) 133

by DaveAtFraud (#46518037) Attached to: New Facial Recognition Software May Detect Looming Road Rage

Probably they settle for the eye tracking. Sensing distraction and sleepiness would prevent a lot of accidents. The car would alarm the driver or gently park by itself.

Something like that (my emphasis in bold) would make it impossible for most guys to get anywhere in a car in most beach cities. Even worse, I can hear my wife now saying, "Would you keep your eyes on the road! We can't get there if the car parks itself every time some eye candy in a bikini is in view."

Cheers,
Dave

Comment: Re:Let me know if you find it (Score 1) 712

I liked the way Obama blocked building the keystone pipeline to supposedly placate the greeny types. So instead of shipping the Bracken crude in a fairly non-polluting pipeline, we have trains pulling it to where it can be processed and polluting and sometimes exploding along the way. Same amount of oil gets burned plus you have the pollution from the trains plus a few exploding trains. Real enviromentalism in practice.

Cheers,
Dave

% APL is a natural extension of assembler language programming; ...and is best for educational purposes. -- A. Perlis

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