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Submission + - Edge is the default browser in Windows 10->

Meshach writes: Chris Beard (CEO of Mozilla) sent an angry letter to Microsoft protesting how Windows 10 sets your default browser to Edge (the Internet Explorer replacement) even if you have previously set your default browser to something else. Users can customize the browser themselves but Beard says that this process is not obvious for non-tech users.
Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Most common error is: PIBMAC (Score 1) 426 426

The ISO for Home and Pro are the same. If you have a key (a Win 10 key! A Win 7 or 8.n key won't do!), it will install the right edition without asking. If you skip key entry it will give you the choice as what to install. So, no, you can't accidentally grab a Pro ISO and try to install it on a Home version, because the Pro and the Home ISO are one and the same. Only the key makes the difference.
GNU is Not Unix

Video Purism Offers Free (as in Freedom) Laptops (Video) 55 55

Purism uses its own OS, PureOS, which is a Debian derivative by way of Ubuntu and other members of the Debian-derivative family, but with no taint of proprietary code. Now imagine all the binaries stripped out of the Linux kernel, making it closer to the FSF ideal of a 100% free operating system than the Linux kernel in use almost everywhere else.

They're still using a proprietary BIOS, but have people working on a Free one. The main thing, though, is that Purism is working to give you all the privacy and freedom they can -- with more coming as they keep working to replace proprietary bits of the OS, BIOS, and hardware drivers with Free Software. Best of all, even if you don't need a new laptop right now, you can download PureOS and run it on any compatible hardware you already own.

Comment Re:Not Quite (Score 1) 66 66

For many software patents, I'd agree with you.

The problem with video compression is that many of the patents involved do represent real research, the expensive kind. They aren't one-click shopping patents. They're fundamentally pushing forward the state of the art. The people who do that work are expensive and need a lot of time, so, there has to be some way to pay for their efforts. Google's approach of subsidising all research via search ads is perhaps not as robust as one might hope for, even though it's convenient at the moment.

I don't know if DASH specifically is complex enough to deserve patent protection, but if you look at the massive efforts that go into the development of codecs like h.264, h.265 etc, the picture gets more complex. It's not pharmaceutical level research budgets but it's probably the closest the software world gets.

Comment Re:Closed Ecosystem (Score 1) 91 91

No, the issue is that it's open source and carriers customise the components. Android had a working online update infrastructure since day one, actually since before Apple did. But that's no use when the first thing OEMs do is repoint those mechanisms at their own servers and make huge changes to the code.

The comparisons with Linux are especially strange. Guess what? Upstreams who develop software for Linux and see it get repackaged by distributors are in exactly the same boat as Google. They see their software get packaged up, distributed, bugs possibly introduced and then upgrades may or may not make it to users. Yeah yeah, Debian say they backport security fixes. That's great when it's a popular package and a one liner. When the security fix in question is a major architectural upgrade, like adding a sandbox to an app, then users just get left behind on old versions without the upgrades because that's the "stable" version.

And of course many users are on Linux distros that stop being supported pretty quick. Then you're in the same boat as Android: old versions don't get updates.

Comment Re:My Pet Peeves (recent Windows laptop keyboards) (Score 1) 671 671

I guess it depends on what you're used to. I practically grew up with laptops, so I always type numbers with the upper row, even if a numeric pad is available. I also think the number pad is a matter of space and reach, even on a desktop, but especially on a laptop where keys are already crammed. I'm sure a lot of proficient typists also appreciate a centred keyboard on a laptop.

Comment Re:Caps Lock used to power a huge lever. (Score 1) 671 671

My keyboard has two Ctrl keys in a rather symmetric orientation, and I like them that way, much like the two Shift keys. If the left Ctrl were in the place of Caps Lock, then its right counterpart would have to replace Enter.

It's not that I like having a Caps Lock around doing nothing, but it's not exactly a great place for a modifier which generally comes in symmetric pairs.

Comment Re:User scripts FTW (Score 1) 6 6

I'm not comfortable with what you wrote (yet). The easy route for me--right now--is to keep doing it the way that i know. I wonder though, which method works in more browsers (and versions) that support scripting?

Right now, i want to add a Home button to Memrise after a course review (maybe even during a review) or learning session. The top bar changes and it takes extra clicks to get home, even when the session is over.

(Source not shown to do "Filter error: Please use fewer 'junk' characters." And to think, /. used to be for geeks.)

So, the easy way out might be:

var review = document.getElementById('gardening-area');
review....= (add button here) + review.....;

What would you do?

Security

Video Veteran IT Journalist Worries That Online Privacy May Not Exist (Video) 43 43

Tom Henderson is a long-time observer of the IT scene, complete with scowl and grey goatee. And cynicism. Tom is a world-class cynic, no doubt about it. Why? Cover enterprise IT security and other computing topics long enough for big-time industry publications like ITWorld and its IDG brethren, and you too may start to think that no matter what you do, your systems will always have (virtual) welcome mats in front of them, inviting crackers to come in and have a high old time with your data.

Note: Alert readers have probably noticed that we talked with Tom about cloud security back in March. Another good interview, worth seeing (or reading).

I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when you looked at it in the right way, did not become still more complicated. -- Poul Anderson

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