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Programming

C# Book Recommendations? 116

Posted by Cliff
from the which-one-is-the-best-to-learn-from dept.
Stevecrox asks: "I'm in my final year of university and have a working knowledge of C/C++, Visual Basic, VHDL and a variety of Assembler languages, however chatting to a friend on his placement year I've been told that C# is what employers are really looking for. What book would you recommend to someone looking to learn C# with my experience?"
Businesses

Why Consumer Macs Are Enterprise-Worthy 449

Posted by kdawson
from the toys-no-longer dept.
cyberkahn tips us to an article in Computerworld that makes the case for Apple's consumer machines moving into corporations. (The article dismisses Linux desktops in the enterprise in a single bullet item.) With the press that Vista has been getting, is Apple moving into a perfect storm? Quoting: "There is no comparison between Apple's 'consumer' machines and the consumer lines of its competitors. All of Apple's machines are ready to move into the enterprise, depending on the job at hand. The company's simple and elegant product line, which is also highly customizable, will be Apple's entree to the business market — if IT decision-makers can get over their prejudice against equipment that's traditionally been aimed at consumers."
Education

Politics and 'An Inconvenient Truth' 630

Posted by Zonk
from the get-this-sorted-out dept.
Frogbeater writes "The producer of 'An Inconvenient Truth' is accusing the National Science Teachers Association of being in the pocket of Big Oil because she can't get preferential treatment for her film. The entire situation is turning into a 'if you're not with us, you're against us' yelling match. Regardless of the viewpoint, is it even possible that science can remain apolitical? Has it ever been?" The Washington Post makes things out to be less than above board: "In the past year alone, according to its Web site, Exxon Mobil's foundation gave $42 million to key organizations that influence the way children learn about science, from kindergarten until they graduate from high school ... NSTA's list of corporate donors also includes Shell Oil and the American Petroleum Institute (API), which funds NSTA's Web site on the science of energy. There, students can find a section called 'Running on Oil' and read a page that touts the industry's environmental track record -- citing improvements mostly attributable to laws that the companies fought tooth and nail, by the way -- but makes only vague references to spills or pollution. NSTA has distributed a video produced by API called 'You Can't Be Cool Without Fuel,' a shameless pitch for oil dependence."

Comment: Re:Perhaps a stretch (Score 1) 373

by El (#12305020) Attached to: Tridgell Reveals Bitkeeper Secrets
The only reason Bit-Keeper is annoyed is because they see a free product competing with thier own. Most companies adopt a business model of giving the client away for free and charging for the server. To the best of my knowledge, Tridgell was reverse-engineering the client, not the server. That shouldn't have resulted in any revenue loss to BitKeeper if they had followed the traditional business model. Wasn't BitKeeper also giving their client away for free?

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