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Comment Re: It's not about the crime (Score 1) 255

21 you can finally buy beer, but still cant rent a car

I was 19 the first time I rented a car. Mine was in the shop for collision repair (dumbass backed into me in a parking lot right as I arrived at work). There weren't as many options and they charged more per day than if I had been 25, but I was able to rent a car. It beat biking through the summer heat to get to work.

Comment Re:ADVERTISING (Score 1) 198

They want to control your network. They want to inject advertising into everything you do. They want you to have no choice but to use DNS servers they control.

That was just about my first thought too: "what are the odds this will have/allow something like Privoxy to do ad-filtering?" To be fair, I haven't bothered installing that on my own firewall just yet (relying on ABP and Ghostery for now), but it's on the to-do list - and having seen recent upturns in ad-blocking usage lately, I'm absolutely certain Google will have noticed that upturn too, and strongly suspect it's a factor in any move like this. (It's also interesting to note that Apple have just added support for ad-blocking in Safari without jailbreaking to iOS 9 - probably not something welcomed in Mountain View!)

Comment Interpreting requirements (Score 1) 242

I go through recruiters. With X years of programming experience, they come to me. But HR are the ones who gave them the job requirements, usually.

I've been around long enough, though, that I can interpret what HR says into what's actually needed. 5 years of jQuery experience? How about 15 years of object-oriented javascript programming, that oughta be good. I can familiarize myself with a specific library as needed.

Reading through the job requirements from a recruiter is like being at the end of a game of telephone - you have to guess what the actual intent is, see if it's a job you really want, and if it's something you think you're qualified for.

Comment Re:"You have to upgrade NOW, or you are losing mon (Score 1) 4

How do you mean that? You expect 10 to become better? Upgrading to 10 also means you give Microsoft free reign over your computer. With 7/8(.1) you had at least a certain level of control.

Basically, the best way is to upgrade and then rollback. That secures your "free" upgrade and you can continue to use whatever you like.

Comment Re: As much as possible (Score 2) 350

Have you looked recently? My Dell XPS 15 L502x, that I bought a few years ago on sale for 525â can take 16GB. We bought three of these and we all upgraded from the stock 4GB to 16GB because RAM prices were at an all time low. I can't believe modern laptops take less....

Comment Re:The problem is Android (Score 1) 208

That's why you need to upgrade to CyanogenMod. It's all the bloatware and adware that's eating up the battery life.

I have been getting better battery life out of my Moto X since unlocking it and putting CyanogenMod on it. I think a big part of that, though, isn't a matter of stock settings or installed apps, but more a matter of increased flexibility in power settings. CyanogenMod lets you do things like turn LTE and 3G on and off that I don't think the stock firmware allows. With Tasker, I can have it automatically disable LTE when WiFi is available, and reenable it when out of range of WiFi. If I'm doing something that's not too data-intensive, I can manually cut data speeds back to 3G or EDGE. Sometimes, the battery ends up lasting longer now than it did when my phone was new, and I've had it for more than a year and a half now.

AI

Video Tim O'Reilly and the 'WTF?!' Economy (Video) 111

This is a conversation Tim Lord had with Tim O'Reilly at OSCON. Tim O'Reilly wrote an article titled "The WTF Economy,", which started with these words: "WTF?! In San Francisco, Uber has 3x the revenue of the entire prior taxi and limousine industry." He talks about Uber and AirbnB and how, with real-time measurement of customer demand, "The algorithm is the new shift boss." And then there is this question: "What is the future when more and more work can be done by intelligent machines instead of people, or only done by people in partnership with those machines?"

My (late) father was an engineer. Politically, you could have called him a TechnoUtopian. He believed -- along with most of his engineer, ham radio, and science fiction writer and reader friends -- that as machines took over the humdrum tasks, humans would work less and create more. O'Reilly seems to have similar beliefs, even though (unlike my father) he's seen the beginnings of an economy with self-driving cars and trucks, factory machines that don't need humans to run them, and many other changes the 1950s and 1960s futurists didn't expect to see until we had flying cars and could buy tickets on Pan Am flights to the moon. Listening to these conversations, I remember my father's dreams, but O'Reilly isn't as optimistic as a full-blown TechnoUtopian. He takes a "Something's happening here; what it is ain't exactly clear" view of how work (and pay for work) will change in the near future. Please note that Tim O'Reilly has been called "The Oracle of Silicon Valley," so he's totally worth watching -- or reading, if that's your preferred method of taking in new information.

NOTE: Today we have a "main video," plus a "bonus video" that is viewable only with Flash. But we have a transcript that covers both of them. Enjoy!

They are called computers simply because computation is the only significant job that has so far been given to them.

Working...