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Comment: Re:NYT doesn't report news but does try to create (Score 1) 448

by DamonHD (#49631383) Attached to: The Medical Bill Mystery

There are various bands of dental treatment charges, but they are not uncapped so far as I know. Haven't needed that much fun.

Glasses, varies. My last eye test was completely free as I was referred by a doctor. I do pay for classes, but if you want to go economy it's pretty cheap and you can probably have glasses prescribed. I'm pretty much in the budget category even variofocals.

In neither case could I be bankrupted by unlimited uncontrolled charges.

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:NYT doesn't report news but does try to create (Score 1) 448

by DamonHD (#49629593) Attached to: The Medical Bill Mystery

Except, over here in downtrodden communist UK (keep an eye on tomorrow's election for us to become ultra-communist under a Tory/SNP/DUP alliance (joke)) guess how much of this rubbish I have to deal with?

1) An occasional fixed reasonable prescription charge, free for my kids.

2) Dentist fees, typically about £20/$30 each six month check-up, for a "scale and polish". Again, free for my kids.

Yeah, it's terrible over here.

As I have often pointed out, I would not be on my 3rd significant start-up if I'd been tried to my first random employer because of a health plan, given one or two exciting health blips over time.

Government is never ever good, ever. Unless it builds Interstates.

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:At the same time (Score 1) 302

GEM? Our bug-fix library on top of GEM was bigger than GEM itself.

Not saying that DOS/Windows was anything other than unnecessarily crap and buggy for a long time... (And it'll still take another decade for me to fully trust Microsoft to write 'reliable' rather than meretricious code...)

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:Some random CEO passed away? Oh noes! (Score 3) 176

Someone like many of us, and/or with a life many of us would aspire to, of an age similar to the likely median here (indeed I am a newly-minted 47-year old tech CEO, though not in his league nor in the Valley), white collar, dies suddenly.

It's shocking.

And though most deaths in the news can be dismissed as "would never happen to me because $HUGE_DIFFERENCE", this is less easy to dismiss, even if it turns out ultimately to be just bad luck.

Don't be so airily heartless: this is some genuine human interest for nerds, even if maybe no huge shakes in the big scheme of things.

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:I call bullshit on anything from Forbes (Score 1) 134

by DamonHD (#49534389) Attached to: New Javascript Attack Lets Websites Spy On the CPU's Cache

Look elsewhere in this story: I've posted a 2013 paper where using this type of attack it appears that very nearly 100% of your secret key bits can be recovered as you do a single encryption in another process.

Note: not just revealing that I did an encryption, but what the bits of the key were that did it.

*That* seems bad enough to need serious thought (or refutation) ASAP.

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:Not very useful. (Score 3, Informative) 134

by DamonHD (#49531359) Attached to: New Javascript Attack Lets Websites Spy On the CPU's Cache

Such as this?

https://eprint.iacr.org/2013/4...

"We demonstrate the efficacy of the FLUSH+RELOAD
attack by using it to extract the private encryption keys
from a victim program running GnuPG 1.4.13. We tested
the attack both between two unrelated processes in a sin-
gle operating system and between processes running in
separate virtual machines. On average, the attack is able
to recover 96.7% of the bits of the secret key by observ-
ing a single signature or decryption round"

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:"Surge Pricing" (Score 1) 96

by DamonHD (#49515147) Attached to: How Uber Surge Pricing Really Works

Interesting, thank you.

Given that I no longer see differential pricing in any of my own retail bills, and given remarks from BT execs some time ago that they'd like the differentials to go away, I assumed that they'd gone at wholesale level too.

What ratios are there in the wholesale pricing, eg is it still anything like 4:1 between the highest and lowest by time of day?

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:"Surge Pricing" (Score 4, Insightful) 96

by DamonHD (#49505493) Attached to: How Uber Surge Pricing Really Works

It's called 'scarcity pricing' if you want to keep emotion out of it.

Sometimes it's needed to help prevent a service being overwhelmed: our phone calls used to cost 4x more 9am to 1pm than 6pm to 8am because our phone service (government run) had limited available bandwidth. Now that is no longer an issue (largely c/o fibre optics) there is no pricing surcharge for the daytime peak. Nor even for national vs local calls in the UK. It was a premium charge or lots of failed calls, including for those who really had no alternative to using the morning business slot.

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re:Waste is heat! (Score 1) 198

Yes it is, because you are wasting lots of extra exergy, ie you could be getting the heat you need with far less electricity, leaving the rest for someone else or allowing less upstream resource (nuclear fuel, water, transmission infrastructure) to be consumed for the same outcome.

Rgds

Damon

Comment: Re: What Would be a Trivial Amount? (Score 1) 198

Indeed. We should be targetting microwatts or at most tens of milliwatts not tens of watts. We're talking lazy engineering and insufficiently discerning end-users here.

(I'd like to chat about your stuff off-line, BTW. as part of our public IoT Launchpad project, see sig!)

Rgds

Damon

A debugged program is one for which you have not yet found the conditions that make it fail. -- Jerry Ogdin

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