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Submission + - Dissecting The Unpredictable DDoS Landscape

An anonymous reader writes: DDoS attacks are now more unpredictable and damaging than ever, crippling websites, shutting down operations, and costing millions of dollars in downtime, customer support and brand damage. Nearly twice as many businesses surveyed suffered a DDoS attack last year and more than 40 percent estimated DDoS losses at more than $1 million per day. 49 percent of businesses who suffered a DDoS attack and a breach in 2013 reported that a virus or malware was installed or activated and 55 percent of DDoS targets reported that they were also victims of theft. Attackers stole funds, customer data and intellectual property.

Submission + - ARIN is down to the last /8 of IPv4 addresses (

An anonymous reader writes: On 3 February 2011, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) issued the remaining five /8 address blocks, each containing 16.7 million addresses, in the global free pool equally to the five RIRs, and as such ARIN is no longer able to receive additional IPv4 resources from the IANA. After yesterday's large allocation ( to Akamai, the address pool remaining to be assigned by ARIN is now down to the last /8. This triggers stricter allocation rules and marks the end of general availability of new IPv4 addresses in North America. ARIN thus follows the RIRs of Asia, Europe and South America into the final phase of IPv4 depletion.

Submission + - Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied on a Whole City (

Advocatus Diaboli writes: n a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department sent a civilian aircraft* over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality. Compton residents weren't told about the spying, which happened in 2012. "We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people," Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he's trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren't watching in real time.

Submission + - Our Education System is Failing IT 1

Nemo the Magnificent writes: In this guy's opinion most IT workers can't think critically. They are incapable of diagnosing a problem, developing a possible solution, and implementing it. They also have little fundamental understanding of the businesses their employers are in, which is starting to get limiting as silos are collapsing within some corporations and IT workers are being called upon to participate in broader aspects of the business. Is that what you see where you are?

Submission + - Censorship now apparent in Reddit popular subreddits, list of keywords banned (

An anonymous reader writes: Around 8 months ago was when they enacted the first set of filtered words. Then there was one put in place around 2 months ago. This is real bad news. This place is heavily censored. What's ever crazier is that it either looks like the filter is somewhat smart or mods go through and manually allow certain posts... Make sure to copy the list down and share it with others when they're wonder why all their posts are getting removed.

Submission + - This 1981 BYTE magazine cover explains why we're so bad at tech predictions (

harrymcc writes: If you remember the golden age of BYTE magazine, you remember Robert Tinney's wonderful cover paintings. BYTE's April 1981 cover featured an amazing Tinney image of a smartwatch with a tiny text-oriented interface, QWERTY keyboard, and floppy drive. It's hilarious--but 33 years later, it's also a smart visual explanation of why the future of technology so often bears so little resemblance to anyone's predictions. I wrote about this over at

Submission + - Climate scientist: Why nuclear power may be the only way to avoid geoengineering (

Lasrick writes: Tom Wigley is one of the world's top climate scientists, and in this interview he explains his outspoken support for both nuclear energy and research into climate engineering. Wigley was one of the first scientists to break the taboo on public discussion of climate engineering as a possible response to global warming; in a 2006 paper in the journal Science, he proposed a combined geoengineering-mitigation strategy that would address the problem of increasing ocean acidity, as well as the problem of climate change. In this interview, he argues that hat renewable energy alone will not be sufficient to address the climate challenge, because it cannot be scaled up quickly and cheaply enough, and that opposition to nuclear power 'threatens humanity’s ability to avoid dangerous climate change.'

Submission + - Huawei Tries to Overcome 'Fear of Huawei'

An anonymous reader writes: Documents leaked by former NSA analyst Edward Snowden and published last month suggest that the US government was actually involved in hacking Huawei network equipment in order to spy on China and other countries, including US allies, using Huawei hardware.
Huawei has been working hard to fight the allegations, claiming that security concerns are unfounded and that the company has been caught in a "trade conflict" between the US and China.

Submission + - Theo De Raadt's Small Rant on OpenSSL ( 1

raides writes: Theo De Raadt has been on a better roll as of late. Since his rant about FreeBSD plating catch up (here), he has something to say about OpenSSL. It is worth the 5 second read because it is how a few thousand of us feel about the whole thing and the stupidity that caused this panic. Enjoy

Submission + - Online Skim Reading Is Taking Over The Human Brain

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Michael S. Rosenwald reports in the Washington Post that according to cognitive neuroscientists humans seem to be developing digital brains with new circuits for skimming through the torrent of information online at the expense of traditional deep reading circuitry developed over several millennia. Maryanne Wolf, one of the world’s foremost experts on the study of reading, was startled last year to discover her brain was apparently adapting, too. After a day of scrolling through the Web and hundreds of e-mails, she sat down one evening to read Hermann Hesse’s challenging novel “The Glass Bead Game.” “I’m not kidding: I couldn’t do it,” says Wolf. “It was torture getting through the first page. I couldn’t force myself to slow down so that I wasn’t skimming, picking out key words, organizing my eye movements to generate the most information at the highest speed. I was so disgusted with myself.”

The brain was not designed for reading and there are no genes for reading like there are for language or vision. But spurred by the emergence of Egyptian hieroglyphics, the Phoenician alphabet, Chinese paper and, finally, the Gutenberg press, the brain has adapted to read. For example, at the neuronal level, a person who learns to read in Chinese uses a very particular set of neuronal connections that differ in significant ways from the pathways used in reading English. Before the Internet, the brain read mostly in linear ways — one page led to the next page, and so on. The Internet is different. With so much information, hyperlinked text, videos alongside words and interactivity everywhere, our brains form shortcuts to deal with it all — scanning, searching for key words, scrolling up and down quickly. This is nonlinear reading, and it has been documented in academic studies.

Some researchers believe that for many people, this style of reading is beginning to invade our ability to deal with other mediums. “We’re spending so much time touching, pushing, linking, scrolling and jumping through text that when we sit down with a novel, your daily habits of jumping, clicking, linking is just ingrained in you,” says Andrew Dillon. Wolf points out that she’s no Luddite but she is now training her own brain to be bi-literate. She went back to the Hesse novel the next night, giving herself distance, both in time and space, from her screens. “I put everything aside. I said to myself, ‘I have to do this,’” she said. “It was really hard the second night. It was really hard the third night. It took me two weeks, but by the end of the second week I had pretty much recovered myself so I could enjoy and finish the book.”

Submission + - Major Crytograpic Flaw on some new Intel processors (

An anonymous reader writes: There is a major cryptographic flaw in some Intel Ivy Bridge processors. A special processor instruction intended to improve you data security is broken on some Ivy Bridge processors. There is a hardware bug inside some of the chips that causes it flake out with an illegal instruction exception when any attempt is made to use the RdRand instruction. You are forced then to rely on deterministic pseudo-random software to configure secure banking etc. This can make it hundreds of millions of times easier to crack your business transactions for example.

Submission + - Why are we made of matter?

StartsWithABang writes: The Universe began with equal amounts of matter and antimatter after the Big Bang, and yet when we look out at today's Universe, we find that, even on the largest scales, it's made of at least 99.999%+ matter and not antimatter. The problem of how we went from a matter-antimatter-symmetric Universe to the matter-dominated one we have today is known as baryogenesis, and is one of the greatest unsolved problems in physics. Where are we on the quest to understand it as of April, 2014? A wonderful and comprehensive recap is here.

Submission + - Contractor Charged in 'Microsoft Upskirt View' Project 4

theodp writes: GeekWire reports that a Microsoft contractor has been charged with two counts of voyeurism after investigators discovered that he took 'upskirt' videos of 93 victimized women over the course of a year. Court documents show that the Microsoft vendor employee used a Muvi USB video camera to secretly film "female victim's buttocks, groin area or underwear." Investigators met with the contractor on August 15, at which time he admitted to visiting upskirting websites on his assigned Microsoft computer and taking upskirting videos on the Microsoft campus. They later looked through his computer and found 86 videos. (Note to Self: Stop using restroom at work.)

Submission + - Vint Cerf: CS Programs Must Change To Adapt To Internet of Things (

chicksdaddy writes: The Internet of Things has tremendous potential but also poses a tremendous risk if the underlying security of Internet of Things devices is not taken into account, according to Vint Cerf, Google’s Internet Evangelist.

Cerf, speaking in a public Google Hangout on Wednesday, said that he’s tremendously excited about the possibilities of an Internet of billions of connected objects ( But Cerf warned that the Iot necessitates big changes in the way that software is written. Securing the data stored on those devices and exchanged between them represents a challenge to the field of computer science – one that the nation’s universities need to start addressing.

Internet of Things products need to do a better job managing access control and use strong authentication to secure communications between devices.

Never say you know a man until you have divided an inheritance with him.