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Comment: Apple stagnating again (Score 1) 104

by DJCouchyCouch (#48792847) Attached to: Chrome For OS X Catches Up With Safari's Emoji Support
Let's face it. Apple, known to all as a true innovator, is being taken over with stagnation. Once again, without Steve Jobs as a strong leader, it has rested on its laurels to let competitors overtake it. Google, which was lagging behind in important international emoji support in Chrome, was able to finally catch up to Apple, but only because of the latter's sitting on its hands. To Apple's fans, it's another slap in the face of lagging behind. Look, Google is now the true leader in emoji support and most analysis expect Apple to continue its downward slide towards oblivion. Expect Apple stock do drop by 50% over the next few days.

Comment: Re:Keyboard (Score 2) 216

by DJCouchyCouch (#47929325) Attached to: iOS 8 Review

That's right on the money. All that was stopping millions (and millions!) from going to Apple was a customizable keyboard. And Apple's lost them forever, because of the Android store lock-in.

But seriously, I'd say the keyboard providers will make more money on iOS now than on Android.

+ - Microsoft posts source code for MS-DOS and Word for Windows->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Microsoft, along with the Computer History Museum, has released the source code for MS-DOS 1.1 and 2.0, and Word for Windows 1.1a. Th DOS 2.0 was released for IBM PCs in 1983, and Word for Windows 1.1a came out in 1990. The museum has made the code available for non-commercial use with Microsoft's consent. They've also posted some historical information about the development of this software: '[In August, 1980], IBM had already contracted with Microsoft to provide a BASIC interpreter for the PC, so they asked them to investigate also providing the operating system. Microsoft proposed licensing “86-DOS”, which had been written by Tim Paterson at Seattle Computer Products (SCP) for their 8086-based computer kit because the 16-bit version of CP/M was late. When SCP signed the licensing deal [7] with Microsoft, they didn’t know for sure who the computer manufacturer was. Paterson said “We all had our suspicions that it was IBM that Microsoft was dealing with, but we didn’t know for sure.” [1] He left SCP to work for Microsoft in 1981. “The first day on the job I walk through the door and ‘Hey! It’s IBM.’” Microsoft originally licensed 86-DOS in December 1980 for a flat fee of $25,000. By the next summer they recognized the importance of owning it and being able to license it to other companies making IBM-PC clones, so they purchased all rights for an additional $50,000.'"
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