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Comment: Re:is this seriously (Score 1) 297

by Cyberax (#46760707) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers
It was a verified online poll, i.e. only Venice citizens could vote and only once. They got 75% of participation - I remember reading it on some Italian blog, but I might be wrong.

Anyway, there are plenty of other examples: Kosovo independence was unanimously passed by its parliament, very own Ukrainian independence referendum in 1991 passed with 90% of approval and 80% turnover, South Sudanese referendum passed with 98% approval and so on. Wikipedia has a helpful list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I... In short, it's not unusual for independence referenda to get near-anonimous votes.

Comment: Re:is this seriously (Score 1) 297

by Cyberax (#46760171) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers
Incorrect. You get "landslides" with 55% of votes only when people have to chose between Giant Douche and Shit Sandwich.

Referenda, especially independence referenda, often get 90%+ participation. For example, just last month Putin has obviously orchestrated a non-binding independence referendum in Venice: 89% of participants voted for independence with 75% turnover ( http://rt.com/news/venice-vote... ).

Comment: Re:Over 18 (Score 1) 630

by Cyberax (#46759391) Attached to: IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt
No, it doesn't require any co-signatures on loans. I know from experience.

The slate is then wiped clean.

Nope, it's not wiped clean. Estate simply goes bankrupt - all the usual rules apply. Of course, inheritors don't HAVE to acquire a bankrupt estate - from their point of view it might as well not exist.

Here situation is more complex - inheritors acquired an estate that didn't appear to have debts only to find out about them later. It's an unfortunate situation, but it happens.

Comment: Re:Over 18 (Score 1) 630

by Cyberax (#46756219) Attached to: IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt
Incorrect. If you chose to come into inheritance then you also inherit its debts. Some people do that for sentimental reasons to avoid estate being auctioned, for example. Besides, estate can later be sued in civil courts, for example for contract violations or damages caused by the estate. In a famous case a dead body was sued for damages it caused.

Comment: Re:Over 18 (Score 1) 630

by Cyberax (#46753359) Attached to: IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt
Nope, the only WTF here is that it can be interpreted as an ex-post facto law. However, it's not so clear because tax violations have no statute of limitation for civil penalties. The only matter that was stopping the IRS from going after long-forgotten debts was its policy.

The fact that inheritors are responsible for the civil damages, including ones from future lawsuits, is nothing new. IRS also has power to seize funds without going to courts first, nothing new here as well. It's the combination of these two that makes a technically valid but WTFy situation.

Ma Bell is a mean mother!

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