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Submission + - Australian Defence Scientists Plagiarising Trade Secrets (

An anonymous reader writes: At least five businesses have alleged senior officers in the Defence Science and Technology Organisation have plagiarised intellectual property for their own research [free reg] and then passed it on to government business partners to develop a rival product. There are fears that IP plagiarising could increase with the new Defence Trade Controls Act passed last year despite warnings from the universities it would drive research offshore. Once the trial period ends Australian high-tech researchers will face up to 10 years jail for sending an e-mail or making an overseas phone call without a government permit.

Submission + - 10 Lessons about the Surveillance State (

An anonymous reader writes: Crikey shows the lessons learned from the NSA scandal. Most troubling are the complicity of the mainstream media, the invention of "wanton publicaton", public officials not being prosecuted for perjuring themselves before Congress and companies like Google and Microsoft paid to participate. It also shows powers granted to keep us safe from crime and terrorism are frequently abused for commercial and personal advantage. Should there be a criminal offence for public officials who breach the constitution?

Submission + - Aussie Public Servant criticises govt on Twitter, gets sacked (

An anonymous reader writes: An Australian Public Servant who criticised the government on Twitter has been sacked even though she did not reveal her name or her job to her readers. Federal Judge Warwick Neville told her Australians had no ''unfettered implied right (or freedom) of political expression''. Unlike Americans, Australians have only limited rights to Free Speech. The new ruling makes means public servants cannot criticize the government on social media, even privately and in their own time.

Submission + - CSIRO Sacks Drug Fraud Whistleblower, Axes Independent Investigation (

An anonymous reader writes: The Australian government science organisation accused of a $2.5M fraud of drug giant Novartis have sacked the whistleblower and decided against an independent investigation. Instead the Science minister will allow the CSIRO who proclaim innocence to conduct their own fraud investigation saying "that's the way to best protect the reputation of CSIRO". The Australian government has been accused of failing to protect whistleblowers and new whistleblower laws ban public servants from reporting corrupt politicians.

Submission + - Corruption Allegations Rock Australia's CSIRO (

An anonymous reader writes: Australia's premiere government research organisation the CSIRO has been rocked by allegations of corruption including fraud against drug giant Novartis, dishonesty with 60 top-class scientists bullied or fired, illegally using intellectual property, faking documents and unreliable testimony to judicial officers, but CSIRO Boss Megan Clark has refused to discipline the staff responsible and the federal police don't want to get involved. Victims are unimpressed and former CSIRO scientists are calling for an inquiry.

Take your work seriously but never take yourself seriously; and do not take what happens either to yourself or your work seriously. -- Booth Tarkington