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Australia

Submission + - The Long Reach Of US Extradition (newmatilda.com)

CuteSteveJobs writes: The New Matilda reports how the US is now able to extradite people for minor offences, and asks why foreign governments so willingly give up their nationals to the US to 'face justice' over minor crimes committed outside US borders? Lawyer Kellie Tranter writes "the long arm of the Government is using criminal enforcement powers to enforce commercial interests at the behest of corporations and their lobbyists." A Former NSW Chief Judge said it was bizarre "that people are being extradited to the US to face criminal charges when they have never been to the US and the alleged act occurred wholly outside the US". He said although copyright violations are a great problem, a country "must protect its nationals from being removed from their homeland to a foreign country merely because the commercial interests of that foreign country." Australia recently "streamlined" its laws to make extradition to the US even easier.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - Creeping Government Surveillance, Now Without Warrants (theage.au)

CuteSteveJobs writes: The Age reports on creeping Australian government surveillance, beginning with the first operation launched on a baseless rumour. Six decades later the still-unaware victim read five months of transcripts with deep distress. Two decades ago few Australians would have consented to carrying a government-accessible tracking device, but phone and tablet location data accessible without a warrant includes historic and real-time location data. In 2010-2011 there were 250,000 warrantless accesses by Federal agencies including ASIO, AFP, the Crime Commission, the Tax Office, Defence, Immigration, Citizenship, Health, Ageing, and Medicare.
Australia

Submission + - Australia flags new laws to stop Twitter Trolls (links fixed) (smh.com.au)

CuteSteveJobs writes: Australian Attorney-General Nicola Roxon has flagged new laws to end anonymous trolling via Twitter: "Twitter should reveal the identities of the anonymous trolls who are breaking the law by abusing others online." The new laws were proposed after trolls attacked Footballer Robbie Farah. Farah was later granted a special meeting with the Prime Minister to discuss his concerns about social media abuse, but today it was revealed that Farah had himself trolled the Prime Minister telling her to "Get a Noose" on her 50th birthday. In related news Roxon has posted a video attacking activist group GetUp (like America's MoveOn) for opposing her anonymity-busting Internet surveillance laws.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - Australia flags new laws to stop Twitter Trolls (canberratimes.com.au)

CuteSteveJobs writes: Australian Attorney-General Nicola Roxon has flagged new laws to end anonymous trolling via Twitter: "Twitter should reveal the identities of the anonymous trolls who are breaking the law by abusing others online." The new laws were proposed after trolls attacked Footballer Robbie Farah. Farah was later granted a meeting with the Prime Minister to to discuss social media abuse. Ironically today it was revealed that Farah himself had trolled the Prime Minister telling her to "Get a Noose" on her 50th birthday. In related news Roxon has posted a video attacking activist group GetUp (like America's MoveOn) for opposing her anonymity-busting Internet surveillance laws.
Privacy

Submission + - Australian Attorney General pushes ahead with Gov't Web Snooping (smh.com.au)

CuteSteveJobs writes: Australian Attorney-General, Nicola Roxon has now fully backs a controversial plan to capture the online data of all Australians, despite only six weeks ago saying ''the case had yet to be made." The Tax Office, the Federal Police and the Opposition all support it, with Federal Liberal Party MP Ross Vasta declaring "the highest degree of scrutiny and diligence is called for." With all major parties on board, web monitoring of all Australians appears to be inevitable.
Australia

Submission + - Australian Government drops Internet plan to spy on public... for now (smh.com.au)

CuteSteveJobs writes: Australian Attorney-General Nicola Roxon has been forced to back down on her government's unpopular plan to force ISPs to store the web history and social networking of all Australians for two years. The plan has been deeply unpopular with the public, with hackers attacking the government's spy agency. Public servants at the spy agency promoting the scheme been scathing of the government saying: "These reforms are urgently needed to deal with a rapidly evolving security environment, but there isn't much appetite within the government for anything that attracts controversy," but a document on the scheme released under the Freedom of Information Act had 90% of it redacted to prevent "premature unnecessary debate." Roxon hasn't dropped the unpopular scheme entirely, but only delayed it until after the next election

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