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+ - A ChillingEffects.org for Domain Names->

Submitted by fsterman
fsterman (519061) writes "Domain name seizures used to be a rare occurrence, but US law enforcement has become adept at exploiting a quirk in the Internet's governance structure that allows them to seize a wide range of domains without due process. The rate has been increasing exponentially, with a total of 87 in 2010 to 1,700 in mid-2013. A month ago, nearly 5,000 domains were seized by a corporation using civil proceedings. The types of attacks targeting DNS have been increasing as well, such as when a US embassy had GoDaddy shut down a political protest site."
Link to Original Source

Comment: So, we've already paid experts to plan this... (Score 1) 352

by Myself (#48168089) Attached to: White House Wants Ideas For "Bootstrapping a Solar System Civilization"

And it's pretty cool:
The integrated space plan is an update of the document originally drawn up in the 1980s, and has been variously rediscovered since.

It's a long-view look at where we need to go and what we need to get there. In the 1980s, commercial spaceflight was envisioned somewhat differently than it's happened, and robotics have gotten way more capable, so the refresh is definitely needed.

Comment: resources (Score 5, Informative) 102

by numatrix (#48109497) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Capture the Flag Training

(for some reason the first time I loaded this page there were no comments, so some of this is duplicate)

Excellent! Very glad to hear it. There are a /ton/ of helpful resources out there for you. Here's a brain-dump of some of the most popular:

* CTFTime : http://ctftime.org/ : Website that tracks team scores, upcoming events, and writeups for previous events.
* CapTF : http://captf.com/ : My CTF dump-site that includes a calendar, links to "practice" sites (aka Wargames), and many years worth of CTF events archived
* Field Guide : http://trailofbits.github.io/c... : Specifically covering the skills / approaches, the field guide is a good read for anyone getting into this world.
* Guide for Running a CTF : https://github.com/pwning/docs... : Written by PPP (CMU's ever-dominant CTF team) along with feedback from the broader CTF community, this guide is more relevant when making a CTF, but can aid in understanding how the good CTFs are designed.
* PicoCTF : https://picoctf.com/ : PicoCTF is designed for high school students, but had an awesome difficulty curve, getting up to some relatively advanced challenges by the end of it. It's also extremely well designed, runs for a longer period of time and is a
* CSAW : https://ctf.isis.poly.edu/ : One of the best events targeted specifically at College students, unfortunately the qualifier round just finished, and the participants already selected for the final round, but you can always check out the archives of previous challenges to get a feel for the difficulty. Note that the qualifier event is typically intended to be much easier than the in-person finals to better encourage new students to get into the sport.
* IRC : irc.freenode.net#pwning : There's a lively and active community in #pwning on freenode that would be happy to help you with questions/advice related to CTFs.
* YouTube : There's a couple of different presentations/talks on CTFs over the years. If your'e interested in learning more about attack-defense CTFs and in-particular DEF CON CTF, I gave an old talk that's mostly still relevant (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okPWY0FeUoU), though I'd recommend you not focus on A/D at first, but just get into the regular challenge based or jeopardy boards as they're sometimes called.

The best way to prepare for CTF is by... playing CTFs. There's no real magic formula, just go out there and start working on challenges. Old CTFs are great as learning exercises since you can usually cheat and read a writeup, but avoid the temptation as much as possible. If stuck, go off and try another problem first, and only if you're /really/ stuck should you check out a writeup.

Cellphones

Samsung Announces Galaxy Alpha Featuring Metal Frame and Rounded Corners 220

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the strange-sense-of-deja-vu dept.
mrspoonsi (2955715) writes with word that Samsung is hopping on the metal case and rounded corners design bandwagon. From the article: Samsung says a metal frame and curved corners give the Galaxy Alpha a "sophisticated" look. The South Korean company describes the Galaxy Alpha as representing a "new design approach". The firm has previously been criticised for the plastic feel of its handsets at a time when other firms have opted to use materials marketed as having a "premium" feel. Samsung Electronics saw a 20% year-on-year drop in its last quarter's profit. The phone features 2G of RAM, a 4.7" AMOLED display, and either an 8-core Exynos 5 or 4-core Snapdragon 801.

Comment: From a non-driver perspective (Score 4, Insightful) 218

by dada21 (#47589001) Attached to: The Great Taxi Upheaval

I stopped driving 2 years ago, voluntarily. My SUV cost me around $800 a month in replacement costs. Another $200 in maintenance. I was burning through $12,000 a year in gas. I spent an average of 1000 hours a year in the car, for work, for groceries, for fun. 999 of those hours were spent focused on the road. I hate talking on the phone while driving.

Consider my annual total: about $25,000 + 1000 hours of my time. For the "privilege" to sit in Chicago traffic.

I'm a consultant. I now use UberX every day. I also use public transportation when I'm not in a rush or when someone isn't paying me to swing by.

I spent about $5000 a year on UberX. $100 a week. While I am being driven around, I can respond to emails, make phone calls. I bill for that time. When a customer wants me to visit them, I pass the UberX fee on to them plus 50%. No one scoffs at it. Some customers will realize the cost of me visiting them is more expensive than just consulting over the phone.

I figure I'm $20,000 ahead in vehicle costs, plus I've literally gained another 600-700 hours of phone and email consulting time a year. Call it $40,000 ahead.

I don't take cabs, because they don't like to come to where my HQ is (ghetto neighborhood). UberX comes 24/7, within minutes.

My little sister had an emergency surgery a few months ago. I immediately hired an UberX driver, who took me from the office, to the hospital. He waited. We then took my sister to her apartment to get her cats and clothes, then he took us to the pharmacy. After, he drove us to our dad's house to drop her off, in the suburbs of Chicago. Then he drove me back to work. 3 hours, $90. I can't get a cab to wait even 10 minutes while I drop off a package at UPS. Forget about them taking credit cards.

UberX charges my Paypal account and they're off. If they're busy, they charge a surcharge. I can pick it or take public transportation.

I know why the Chicago Taxi authorities want Uber gone. But a guy like me is their best customer. Next year I'll budget $10,000 a year for UberX, and it will make my life so much more enjoyable and profitable.

Driving yourself around is dead. It's inefficient. Ridesharing is "libertarian" because it is truly freeing.

Comment: Helped diagnose an allergic reaction, too! (Score 1) 47

by Myself (#47272409) Attached to: 'Selfie' Helps Doctors Diagnose Mini-Stroke

After popping a bunch of benadryl and being satisfied that my condition wasn't worsening, I elected to make a regular appointment with my GP instead of going to Emergency.

I decided to take a few photos of the skin rash before it went away, which allowed the doctor (three days later, when I was totally fine again) to quickly identify that it was indeed an allergic reaction, and based on where it appeared, the subsequent interview helped diagnose the cause. Worked great!

Comment: It's dead either way, why not try this? (Score 5, Insightful) 371

by Myself (#44111487) Attached to: FCC Considering Proposal For Encrypted Ham Radio

Whenever I try to convert part-15 geeks into part-97 geeks, they're interested in high power, they're interested in DIY equipment, they're interested in satellites, they're interested in propagation, and as soon as I mention that you can't swear or encrypt, they walk away.

"If I can't send useful traffic over it, why would I bother?"

Ham radio is losing a generation of geeks who've grown up on a more-free network and aren't interested in a restricted one. Should we just let them go?

Comment: Ricochet did this post-9/11, routing worked fine. (Score 3, Interesting) 45

by Myself (#43938103) Attached to: Private Networks For Public Safety

While much of Manhattan's traditional communications infrastructure was literally a smoking crater after 9/11, the Ricochet mesh network was alive and well, built to barely notice the loss of individual nodes.

The company had recently gone bankrupt, but all the hardware was still in place, so some ex-employees drove from Denver to NYC with a bunch of modems and laptops, to bring mobile connectivity to the recovery effort.

Mesh works in this case because MCDN uses geographic routing -- the packet header literally contains a packed lat/long for the destination, and nodes make their routing decisions by angle and distance. There's a layer of name-to-geo resolution which makes that all work, and in the Ricochet days it was centralized, but I believe it could be made to operate with DHT like torrent networks do now.

Comment: Re:I sell actual things in Bitcoin (Score 1, Interesting) 293

by dada21 (#43493797) Attached to: Drug Site Silk Road Says It Will Survive Bitcoin's Volatility

Since my financial stability for the future doesn't correlate with income nor even profit, I think my risk is pretty low. Even if volatility continues, and even if my businesses took in 50% of their revenues in BTC, I still wouldn't see any actual harm. The businesses have been around for decades, and they're self-sufficient and stable.

Converting BTC to fiat currency puts a sell-pressure on BTC. Holding BTC would reduce the selling supply, thereby reducing volatility from the sell side. It's the same with dollars: I hoard my dollars in cash "under the mattress" rather than put it in a bank to get loaned out as debt (money multiplier effect).

The "market forces" in BTC right now are pretty unique because only a small number of BTC holders are actually transacting. Most people are "long game speculators", and are neither buying things with BTC nor selling it to liquidate for fiat currency. As the number of BTC users goes up (which will likely happen when volatility is reduced), I believe we'll see a more stable platform.

Comment: Re:I sell actual things in Bitcoin (Score 1, Insightful) 293

by dada21 (#43493765) Attached to: Drug Site Silk Road Says It Will Survive Bitcoin's Volatility

I'd be happy to throw back just to the 1800s or so -- when poor people could actually save their way to wealth, where credit addiction didn't lead to thrill-seeking behavior addiction, and where the money supply wasn't a medium to fund warfare and welfare entitlements benefiting the rich and powerful.

Business regulations, money regulations and savings dilution aren't modern in any way, but they've become the norm. I'd rather see all 3 go away, or at least just become part of the nanny-state economy, not my economies.

He who has but four and spends five has no need for a wallet.

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