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Comment: Re:Every single day (Score 1) 180

by bill_mcgonigle (#47567775) Attached to: Comcast Confessions

So, pray tell, if writing your representative is worse than useless, what's the action that would actually work?

Working to obsolete that system.

"You never change things by fighting the existing reality.
To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete."

- R. Buckminster Fuller

Politics is an enormous opportunity cost that ought to be left to people who cannot participate in society in a more meaningful way. e.g. Libertarianism is an abject failure by every conceivable measure. Intent isn't important, it's results, and things have *not* gotten better. Yeah, 1 out of 10 battles are won, but any General can tell you how that war will go.

Comment: Re:Common? (Score 1) 191

Right. See if it meets PCI requirements (you need to at least be able to reference them if you're in this line of work). If so, leave a note with the employer as to what might (will) happen and move on.

If every port on the VLAN is 802.1x certificate-authenticated you might not need to actually worry. Hahahaha, yeah, I'm sure it is....

Comment: Percent of the cost of device and medium (Score 1) 221

by tepples (#47567433) Attached to: Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' Ability To Rip CD Music To Hard Drive
Unless the plaintiffs are suing under a theory based on section 1003 of that chapter, which obligates manufacturers of a "digital audio recording device" or "digital audio recording medium" to pay a royalty despite not infringing copyright. That's 2 percent of the price of the device (minimum $1, maximum $8) plus 3 percent of the cost of the medium.

Comment: "...not an infringement of copyright" --17 USC 107 (Score 1) 221

by tepples (#47567267) Attached to: Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' Ability To Rip CD Music To Hard Drive

"Fair use" does not actually make copying legal. Rather, it's a defense to the accusation of copyright infringement.

How so? I was under the impression that a defense to infringement makes certain forms of copying legal because it's a defense.

You still infringed the copyright

Then I must have misread the phrase "...is not an infringement of copyright" in 17 USC 107. What was it intended to mean?

Comment: Re:medical services need a billing time limit (Score 1) 453

by operagost (#47567213) Attached to: 35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

We gave up our freedom through the ACA, and yet this continues. It's not about being billed, it's about being billed incorrectly and not having any control over the process. The UK has fully socialized health care, yet people are denied care or left to die waiting... sometimes, literally waiting in the ER.

Clearly, giving up more freedom isn't the answer.

Comment: Yeah, Roo-see-uh (Score 2) 44

Fascinating. If they can detect suspicious fraud nodes, TOR could build into their project a blacklist support that they publish and honor in their code. Then it becomes a whack-a-mole issue, which is better han the current situation.

Ummm...what with Russia trying to de-anonymize TOR and all. Bad Rooskies.

Comment: Re:Lies and statistics... (Score 1) 453

by Shakrai (#47566549) Attached to: 35% of American Adults Have Debt 'In Collections'

That's a valid point but you kind of missed the bigger picture. With my history and health status they shouldn't be on the hook for more than $300-$500 annually. That's the cost of an annual physical and standard blood/urine lab work. All it took was one incident to largely wipe out their earnings on me and in this case the costs really weren't inflated all that much. Despite what the other poster thinks, the immunoglobulin really is that expensive. It has a very short shelf life, production is a bitch, and there's little economy of scale because it's so rarely needed. Socialized medicine won't fix any of that....

Comment: Re:Tower Systems (Score 1) 190

I build and supply retail chain management systems and part of the platform is a store management system, which communicates with POS machines (in most cases via a share). So our solution to what you are describing (a common problem with POS systems) is to put our store management system on a Linux machine that has 2 network cards in it, one is the Internet connection and the other is LAN, this Linux machine runs the store management system and it becomes local network manager and a firewall.

The POS machines are on the LAN only, no Internet connection for them, the store management system connects to the retail management system that is external to the store (controls the entire chain). This way we can avoid this huge security breach.

Comment: common or not, it's not prudent (Score 0) 190

Well, whether this practice is common or not is probably irrelevant, it is still not a prudent thing to do.

I build and supply retail chain management software to a number of chains, there are dozens of stores that use it, we switch at least one computer in a store to a Linux machine that runs the store management software (the chain management software is a central system and it doesn't run in a store, but all stores talk to it.)

Store management system is on the Linux machine that faces the Internet, it has 2 network cards, one is the Internet and the other is LAN (the same machine controls the LAN). Since this is Linux, iptables is used to filter out any unnecessary traffic.

I think there should be some sort of packet filter on Internet facing equipment, POS or anything else.

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