Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - 6 month subscription of Pandora One at 46% off. ×

Submission + - A petition to make July 20th a national holiday to honor the moon landing (

Curseyoukhan writes: The moon landing mattered, so lets mark it with a holiday. People remember those. This petition at needs 100k signers by August 20th to get considered. If we can put a man on the moon why can't we make it a national holiday? This isn't rocket science, it's clicking a damn link. Do it for Buzz, Neil and Michael Collins. Do it for your dreams of the future.

Submission + - Report: DoD Has Wasted Billions on IT Security (

Curseyoukhan writes: ""During exercises and testing, DoD red teams, using only small teams and a short amount of time, are able to significantly disrupt the 'blue team’s' ability to carry out military missions. Typically, the disruption is so great, that the exercise must be essentially reset without the cyber intrusion to allow enough operational capability to proceed. These stark demonstrations contribute to the Task Force’s assertion that the functioning of DoD’s systems is not assured in the presence of even a modestly aggressive cyber-attack."

Pentagon spent +$10 billion on IT security in FY 2011."

The Internet

Submission + - Preserving the "Web before the Web:" Minitel history could be lost (

coondoggie writes: "It's been almost a year since France Telecom shut down its once widely popular Minitel online services and historians are worried that its legacy from a preservationist point of view is being lost forever. The Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA., naturally wants to collect and preserve all manner of industry historical artifacts and Minitel if one of the central components of its "Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing" exhibit."

Submission + - Why You Shouldn't Believe the Cyber-War Hype (

Curseyoukhan writes: "he United States is not at cyber war. There, I said it. Someone had to.

Don’t feel bad if this is news to you. It is also news to all the Congress-critters and nearly every journalist who has used the term. "But wait," you say. "What about all the reports and government screaming? Do they mean nothing?"

Pretty much, yes.

It is important to remember that no one really knows what cyber war is. One thing is for certain, though: Cyber war is not what the Chinese currently appear to be up to. That’s called spying.

If stealing secrets is an act of war then America is currently at war with all of its allies. Espionage is what governments do so they don’t have to go to war...directly. What appears to be upsetting people is that the Chinese are using espionage to make money in a way that the United States didn’t think of first."


Submission + - US Lobbyists Writing EU Online-Privacy Law (

Curseyoukhan writes: "The European Union (EU) found a fast, cheap way to come up with a new online privacy law: Outsourcing much of the work to lobbyists, including the American Chamber of Commerce, Amazon, eBay and a few groups that are actually based in Europe.

The EU’s parliament–using a trick from Congress’s Guide to Destroying Institutional Credibility–is cutting and pasting the exact language used by the lobbyists into its law. The lobbyists are also doing an impressive job of getting rid of anything that might smack of actual consumer protection."


Submission + - Microsoft and Google push for FCC's public Wi-Fi for free networks (

colinneagle writes: How sweet would it be to dump that monthly cellphone bill in favor of making calls over free Wi-Fi networks, so powerful it would be like "Wi-Fi on steroids"? Microsoft and Google are working together to support the FCC's powerful Wi-Fi for free proposal.

Now, the Washington Post reports that Google, Microsoft and other tech giants "say a free-for-all WiFi service would spark an explosion of innovations and devices that would benefit most Americans, especially the poor."

Meanwhile, AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and chip makers Intel and Qualcomm are lobbying hard against the FCC's proposal. These wireless carrier companies are opposed to using the spectrum for free Wi-Fi to the public and insist that the airwaves should instead be sold to businesses.

But FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski has designed the free Wi-Fi plan. If you are interested, you can read Genachowski's Presentation on White Spaces for Wireless Broadband and Genachowski's remarks to the President's Council of Advisors on Science & Technology.


Submission + - Rumpelstiltskin Molecule Spins Toxic Ions Into Gold (

sciencehabit writes: A microbe called Delftia acidovorans manufactures and secretes delftibactin, which forces gold ions to precipitate out of solution. As the bacteria carry out this job, they not only remove highly toxic gold ions from their surroundings, but they also create the neutrally charged gold nuggets on which it then makes a home. Researchers say that they've now isolated delftibactin for the first time. If scientists isolate enough of the molecule, could they harvest gold from the oceans? Perhaps. But then again, delftibactin also carries out the same trick with iron ions. So if you tried it on a large scale you might get lumps of iron instead.

Submission + - "Superomniphobic" nanoscale coating repels almost any liquid ( 1

cylonlover writes: A team of engineering researchers at the University of Michigan has developed a nanoscale coating that causes almost all liquids to bounce off surfaces treated with it. Creating a surface structure that is least 95 percent air, the new "superomniphobic" coating is claimed to repel the broadest range of liquids of any material in its class, opening up the possibility of super stain-resistant clothing, drag-reducing waterproof paints for ship hulls, breathable garments that provide protection from harmful chemicals, and touchscreens resistant to fingerprint smudges.

Submission + - Cutting-edge tech giving Boeing 787 cutting-edge problems (

Curseyoukhan writes: "Boeing is discovering the problem with using bleeding-edge tech. To improve fuel efficiency the 787 Dreamliner is more reliant on electric systems than any other commercial plane before it. For example, it has replaced its hydraulic systems with electronic ones. All those systems require nearly 1.5 megawatts of electricity. For the first time Boeing is using lithium-ion batteries, which weigh half as much as the nickel-metal hydride ones. So maybe it's no surprise that it has had problems with the electrical system and that one of those batteries caught on fire.

The 787 is also the most outsourced commercial plane in history. Boeing did that in order to speed up assembly and delivery. Not only has it slowed delivery but it likely also resulted in more problems in the assembly process."

Submission + - 3D Printable Ammo Clip Skirts New Proposed Gun Laws (

Sparrowvsrevolution writes: Slashdot has closely followed the developing controversy around Defense Distributed, the group that hopes to create 3D printable guns to defeat gun control legislation. The group has yet to create an entirely 3D printable gun. But it's already testing the limits of gun control with a simpler invention: the 3D printable ammunition clip.

Over the past weekend, Defense Distributed successfully 3D-printed and tested an ammunition magazine for an AR semi-automatic rifle, loading and firing 86 rounds from the 30-round clip. That homemade chunk of curved plastic holds special significance: Between 1994 and 2004, so-called “high capacity magazines” capable of holding more than 10 bullets were banned from sale. And a new gun control bill proposed by California Senator Diane Feinstein in the wake of recent shootings would ban those larger ammo clips again. President Obama has also voiced support for the magazine restrictions.

Defense Distributed says it hopes to preempt any high capacity magazine ban by showing how impossible it has become to prevent the creation of a simple spring-loaded box in the age of cheap 3D printing. It's posted the 3D-printable magazine blueprints on its website,, and gun enthusiasts have already downloaded files related to the ammo holders more than 2,200 times.


Submission + - Disney Wants to Track You With RFID ( 3

Antipater writes: Disney parks and resorts have long had a system that combined your room key, credit card, and park ticket into a single card. Now, they're taking it a step further by turning the card into an RFID wristband (called a "MagicBand"), tracking you, and personalizing your park experience, targeted-ad style.

"Imagine booking guaranteed ride times for your favorite shows and attractions even before setting foot in the park," wrote Tom Staggs, chairman of Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, in a blog posting on Monday. "With MyMagic+, guests will be able to do that and more, enabling them to spend more time together and creating an experience that’s better for everyone."

Disney does go on to talk about all the things you can opt out of if you have privacy concerns, and the whole system seems to be voluntary or even premium.

The Internet

Submission + - ISP Walks Out of Piracy Talks: Not The Internet Police (

An anonymous reader writes: A leading Australian Internet service provider has pulled out of negotiations to create a warning notice scheme aimed at reducing online piracy. iiNet, the ISP that was sued by Hollywood after refusing to help chase down alleged infringers, said that it can’t make any progress with righthsolders if they don’t make their content freely available at a reasonable price. The ISP adds that holding extra data on customers’ habits is inappropriate and not their responsibility.

Submission + - New Malware Wiping Data on Computers in Iran (

L3sPau1 writes: "Iran's computer emergency response team is reporting new malware targeting computers in the country that is wiping data from partitions D through I. It is set to launch on only particular dates. While there has been other data-wiping malware targeting Iran and other Middle East countries such as Wiper and Shamoon, researchers said there is no immediate connection."

Submission + - Japan police offers first-ever reward for wanted hacker (

alphadogg writes: Japanese police are looking for an individual who can code in C#, uses a "Syberian Post Office" to make anonymous posts online, and knows how to surf the web without leaving any digital tracks — and they're willing to pay. It is the first time that Japan's National Police Agency has offered a monetary reward for a wanted hacker, or put so much technical detail into one of its wanted postings. The NPA will pay up to $36,000, the maximum allowed under its reward system. The case is an embarrassing one for the police, in which earlier this year 4 individuals were wrongly arrested after their PCs were hacked and used to post messages on public bulletin boards. The messages included warnings of plans for mass killings at an elementary school posted to a city website.

Submission + - Why Do Companies Bother to Protect Customer Data? (

Curseyoukhan writes: "The upside to protecting consumer data is practically nonexistent, and the downside is barely any greater for the bottom line of most companies. Your business could have state-of-the-art protection or you could have the barest of bare bones security, and it wouldn't make any difference in the consumer-choice process. Furthermore the overwhelming majority of consumers could care less about privacy anyway. So why not just protect the stuff that's actually important to your business?"

You can tell the ideals of a nation by its advertisements. -- Norman Douglas