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Submission + - GSA system shows contractors' private information (cbsnews.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "A software glitch in the government procurement system for contractor work exposed significant amounts of personal and private data of individuals and companies — including Social Security, business tax identification and bank account numbers — open for viewing. The problem could leave many individuals and companies potentially open to a significant threat of identity theft.

The General Services Administration sent an email to parties registered on the System for Award Management, or SAM, on Friday, warning them of the problem, according to a copy obtained by MoneyWatch. The message states that registered SAM users with the proper set of assigned rights "had the ability to view any entity's registration information, including both public and non-public data at all sensitivity levels.""


Submission + - Report: DoD Has Wasted Billions on IT Security (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: ""During exercises and testing, DoD red teams, using only small teams and a short amount of time, are able to significantly disrupt the 'blue team’s' ability to carry out military missions. Typically, the disruption is so great, that the exercise must be essentially reset without the cyber intrusion to allow enough operational capability to proceed. These stark demonstrations contribute to the Task Force’s assertion that the functioning of DoD’s systems is not assured in the presence of even a modestly aggressive cyber-attack."

Pentagon spent +$10 billion on IT security in FY 2011."


Submission + - US Lobbyists Writing EU Online-Privacy Law (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "The European Union (EU) found a fast, cheap way to come up with a new online privacy law: Outsourcing much of the work to lobbyists, including the American Chamber of Commerce, Amazon, eBay and a few groups that are actually based in Europe.

The EU’s parliament–using a trick from Congress’s Guide to Destroying Institutional Credibility–is cutting and pasting the exact language used by the lobbyists into its law. The lobbyists are also doing an impressive job of getting rid of anything that might smack of actual consumer protection."


Submission + - Secret Wars—Cyber or Otherwise—Destroy Democracies (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "In the last week we learned that the Obama administration has given itself the power to both wage pre-emptive cyberwar and order the assassination of U.S. citizens—as long as they’re not in America. Add this to the long-standing ability of presidents to wage pre-emptive physical wars and you have to wonder why we even have a Congress.

What both the drone assassinations and cyberwar powers have in common is a total lack of outside review. The administration claims U.S. citizen Anwar al-Awlaki was given "due process" before being killed in a drone strike. There is no definition of due process that fits the policies described in the just-released legal rationalization. No one—not the courts, not Congress—got to review the decision, even ex post facto."


Submission + - Cyber War is Upon Us–But Only One Side is Attacking (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "The first shot was probably the release of Stuxnet sometime during or before 2009. Even though no one has officially claimed responsibility everyone knows who was behind it. Stuxnet hit with a bang and did a whole lot of damage to Iran’s uranium-enrichment capabilities. We followed up Stuxnet with Flame–the ebola virus of spyware.

What did the Iranians fire back with? A series of massive, on-going and ineffective DDoS attacks on American banks. This is a disproportionate response but not in the way military experts usually mean that phrase. It’s the equivalent of someone stealing your car and you throwing an ever-increasing number of eggs at his house in response.

It’s fascinating that Iran continues to do nothing more despite the fact that U.S. critical infrastructure currently has the defensive posture of a dog waiting for a belly rub. Keep that in mind the next time you hear that a "cyber Pearl Harbor" is imminent."


Submission + - White House Spam Attack is Dumb Reason to Blast Obama Cybersecurity Policy (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "It seems someone in the government has decided to underscore the importance of National Cyber Security Awareness Month by leaking news of an attack against the White House. Or maybe the leak had something to do with the long-promised and/or threatened Executive Order on protecting our vital bodily networks from online attack. Either way, the leaked attack isn’t anything special when you get right down to it. There are reasons to criticize the president's policy — this is not one of them."

Submission + - Air Force Chief, Ex-FBI Agent: Cybersecurity Policy Can't Wait (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "President Obama had better release an executive order on cybersecurity soon because it is increasingly clear that the government’s muddled approach is just making the problem worse. Both the FBI’s former chief of cyber intelligence and the new chief of staff for the Air Force have made it clear that a change has to come soon."

Submission + - Census report doesn't capture extent of poverty (cbsnews.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "The Census Dept. report on poverty uses the same income threshold to determine if a person or household is impoverished that has been in use since 1964. ... While the Census report did show a 1.7 percent decline in income between 2010 and 2011 for most working- and middle-class earners, it did not include several another telling fact: The decline in income came despite an enormous increase in worker productivity. According to the Department of Labor, in the last 10 years worker productivity in non-farm, manufacturing and business jobs has increased an average of 2.59 percent each year, or nearly 26 percent total. Yet median income has fallen over that same period. In 2011, U.S. median income was $50,100 — that's the lowest level since 1996."

Submission + - A Reporter's Doubts About AntiSec's Claim of Hacking Apple Data from FBI (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "AntiSec says they got it from Christopher K. Stangl, an agent featured in a 2009 recruitment video titled “Wanted by the FBI: Cyber Security Experts.” Not saying it didn't happen but the irony level is so high it should make you suspicious. That's not the only oddly perfect claim AntiSec made, either."

Submission + - 3 Incredibly Stupid Security Mishaps You Need to Know About (cio.com)

Curseyoukhan writes: "The U.S. Army's flushes $2B down the drain on a mobile intelligence database; the American State Department fights terrorists by trolling them online; and a website offers a 9mm pistol as reward for finding the hacker who put naughty pictures on its home page. ... but wait! There's more!"

"Atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed." -- Robin, The Boy Wonder