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Comment: Re:Hmmm... Let's see... (Score 1) 205

by Curlsman (#39175757) Attached to: Lawyers For Mining Companies Threaten Scientific Journals
A couple of decades ago, I worked for an aluminum mining and manufacturing company (that no longer exists as such) where fractions of a penny per pound of product meant winning or losing multi-year and multi-million dollar contracts. People on both sides of the negations admitted in public that it was insane. Safety and environmental/pollution controls were technologies we sold to other companies/countries (Soviet/Russia & China though China at the time didn't seem to care about the safety stuff), but our competitors (well, really it's still ALCOA vs everybody else) seemed to not have to meet the same standards we sold technology for based on the rates of fines for violations. With the same metric, we didn't meet the standards either. So even if consumers are willing to pay a little more for a product (say, from Apple), most of the market is forced to race to the bottom of the price list...

Comment: Re:Apple history (Score 1) 368

by Curlsman (#38958643) Attached to: Apple Intern Spent 12 Weeks Porting Mac OS X To ARM
There was one article many years ago that had OSX running on a DEC Alpha server, but the "problem" with it was the all the fans to keep it cool where "noisy".
So even if the port was booting, that does not mean that it will become a released product.


Kind of like DEC at one time:"We have it now, and you can't have it."

Comment: Re:att and the baby bells (Score 1) 247

by Curlsman (#38842621) Attached to: AT&T Threatening To Raise Rates After Merger Failure
Ed Whitacre, CEO of Texas-based SBC wanted to retire as CEO of ATT.
So he had SBC buy Regional Operation Bells Pacific Telesis, Ameritech, Bell South among others (and transferred the state that the employees where employed from to Texas so Texas laws applied, that's what I was told when Pac Bell/SBC outsourced me to a foreign company), and then bought ATT and changed the name of the company.
At each step, every state Public Utilities Commission and Fed agencies let him.

I figured Judge Green, who wrote the Modified Final Judgement that broke up ATT (he also wrote much of the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act) rolled over in his grave.

Then Ed retired.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Whitacre,_Jr.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_H._Greene
http://www.technologyforall.com/TechForAll/legalHistory.html

Comment: Re:PPC vs Intel vs AMD? (Score 1) 197

by Curlsman (#38121154) Attached to: Sources Say Apple Originally Planned AMD Chip For MacBook Air
I seem to recall a single post of OS X running on a DEC Alpha, but the complaint was "it had too many fans."
(Reminds me of a line from Amadeus, a complaint about Mozart's new opera:" Too many notes for the royal ear...")
By that time I'm not sure DEC could have delivered enough volume for Mac desktops, though the Alpha was fabbed by Intel for a while.

Comment: Re:Not anti-intellectualism (Score 1) 949

by Curlsman (#36368008) Attached to: Is There a New Geek Anti-Intellectualism?
Shouldn't college also be OS agnostic? If just teaching Unix/Linux or Windows is the only exposure, aren't the students being cheated out of what is done with programing languages? ZOS, OpenVMS, NONSTOP, SCOPE (on a CDC CYBER I think...), OSX, and some others I've touched that I don't remember, where all different results to some common problems: how programers and users utilizes resources to get work done.

Comment: Advertising delivered to your door (Score 1) 206

by Curlsman (#32484886) Attached to: Canada's Largest Cities Seeing the End of the Phone Book
After working in Directory for several years, it's very clear that the phone company knows that they are selling advertising to just about every business with a phone number and delivering it to the door of millions of potential customers, and making a huge amount of money: only Wireline (what most people think of as The Phone Company) netted more and it took about ten times the number of people. The major successful effort is the categorization of businesses/products/services. As has been pointed out elsewhere here, reproducing the experience of the yellow pages online is very challenging, especially to an industry that historically thinks well managed change takes a decade to deploy and has a lifetime also measured in decades.

"Morality is one thing. Ratings are everything." - A Network 23 executive on "Max Headroom"

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