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Submission + - Gmail now refuses self-signed certificates (

leomrtns writes: Since December 12th gmail stopped accepting self-signed SSL certificates without warning its users(!topic/gmail/Y59f1HQ03uU/discussion). A google employee (!topic/gmail/6gODk9n65ZU/discussion) says that "Gmail now enforces "strict" SSL security. We made this change to offer a higher level of security to better protect your information." But most people (like users from university department servers) cannot simply change the certificates and will end up using an unencrypted connection.

Submission + - Rise of the mobile processors (

Barence writes: "Something strange is happening, something that could leave the latest developments in desktop CPUs and GPUs looking like a sideshow. What if the real battle for the future of computing isn’t between Intel and AMD, but Intel and ARM? What if the next crucial step in graphics technology comes not from Nvidia, but from Imagination Technologies or Qualcomm? What if mobile processor technology is the mainstream? This feature looks at the phenomenal rise in power of mobile components, and asks the experts whether they'll soon be capable of handling all of our needs."

Submission + - Intel Introduces Atom S1200 (

Tengku writes: "Intel has revealed their new Intel Atom S1200 low-power, 64-bit server-class System-on-Chip (SoC), which are suitable for high-density microservers in data centers."

Submission + - Compact Solar System Could Fit Inside Mercury's Orbit (

sciencehabit writes: Astronomers using NASA's Kepler spacecraft have spotted an alien solar system with five planets whose orbits could all fit inside a region that's just a quarter the size of Mercury's path. The planets are somewhat larger than Earth, and all five make Mercury, the sun's fastest planet, which whirls around our star every 88 days, seem like a laggard. Their years are just 1.0, 3.1, 4.6, 7.1, and 9.5 days long, so they're the perfect place to reside if you like frequent birthday parties—and can stand the heat.

Submission + - Why are we so rude online? (

kodiaktau writes: An article reported by the WSJ discusses why online media users are more rude online than they are in person. The story discusses some of the possible reasons being lowered inhibitions because there is formal social interaction. Other theories include feeling like reporting on a phone or other device is simply communicating with a "toy" which dehumanizes the conversation. Submitter's note: A dehumanized conversation has never happened on Slashdot in the last 15 years.

Submission + - Western Lifestyle Disturbing Key Bacterial Balance (

mha writes: "Trillions of bacteria living in and on the human body play a vital role in preserving health. But C-section births, antibiotics and excessive hygiene have been disturbing our microbial balance and possibly contributing to intestinal ailments, obesity, allergies and autism.


Nothing new (to those reading about such topics more or less regularly), but a nice article anyway — a nice introduction for the rest (the majority)."


Submission + - Ubuntu Will Now Have Amazon Ads Pre-installed 1

An anonymous reader writes: Scheduled to be released next month, Ubuntu 12.10 now includes both amazon ads in the user's dash and by default an amazon store in the user's launcher. The reason for these "features"? Affiliate revenue. Despite previous controversies with Banshee and Yahoo, Canonical is "confident it will be an interesting and useful feature for
our 12.10 users." But are the "users" becoming products?

Submission + - Google Faces Heavy Antitrust Fines in the EU (

SquarePixel writes: Europe's competition watchdog is considering formal proceedings against Google over antitrust complaints about the way it promotes its own services in search results, potentially exposing the company to a fine of 10 percent of its global turnover. Google is accused of using its search service to direct users to its own services and to reduce the visibility of competing websites and services. If the Commission found Google guilty of breaking E.U. competition rules, it could restrict Google's business activities in Europe and fine the company up to 10 percent of its annual global revenue (US$37.9 billion last year).

Submission + - There's enough wind energy to power Earth 200x over (

notscientific writes: "Renewable sources of energy are obviously a hit but they have as yet failed to live up to the hype. A new study in Nature Climate Change shows however that there is more than enough power to be harnessed from the wind to sustain Earth's entire population... x200! To generate energy from the wind, we may however need to set up wind farms at altitudes of 200-20,000 metres. To be fair, the study is purely theoretical and does not look at the feasibility of such potential wind farms. Regardless, the paper does provide a major boost to backers of wind-generated energy. Because science has confirmed that the sky's the limit."

Submission + - Thunderbolt finally goes optical (

darien writes: "New cables due before Christmas will finally turn the high-speed Thunderbolt bus into a true optical interconnect. Thunderbolt was originally conceived as an optical connection, and was first revealed at the Intel Developer Forum in 2009 under the name “Light Peak”. Since the consumer launch last year, however, Thunderbolt peripherals have had to make do with cheaper copper cables. Now, the first optical connectors are coming."

Submission + - Space Station Saved by a Toothbrush?

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Denise Chow reports that two spacewalking astronauts successfully replaced a vital power unit on the International Space Station today, defeating a stubborn bolt that prevented the astronauts from properly installing the power unit on the ISS's backbone-like truss with the help of some improvised tools made of spare parts and a toothbrush. Astronauts Sunita Williams and Akihiko Hoshide started by removing the power box, called a main bus switching unit (MBSU), from where it had been temporarily tied down with a tether, then spent several hours troubleshooting the unit and the two bolts that are designed to secure it in place on the space station's truss. After undoing the bolts, the spacewalkers examined them for possible damage, and used improvised cleaning tools and a pressurized can of nitrogen gas to clean out the metal shavings from the bolt receptacles. "I see a lot of metal shavings coming out," Hoshide said as he maneuvered a wire cleaner around one of the bolt holders. Williams and Hoshide then lubricated a spare bolt and manually threaded it into the place where the real bolt was eventually driven, in an effort to ensure that the receptacle was clear of any debris. Then the two applied grease to the sticky bolt as well as extra pressure and plain old jiggling until finally 4½ hours into the spacewalk, Hoshide reported: "It is locked." When Hoshide reported that the troublesome bolt was finally locked into place, the flight managers erupted in applause while astronaut Jack Fischer at Mission Control told the astonauts "that is a little slice of awesome pie.""
The Military

Submission + - Domestic drones: security and privacy game changer (

colinneagle writes: Do you recall when researchers from the University of Texas hijacked a drone via GPS spoofing? Congress does and held a House Homeland Security Oversight Subcommittee hearing called Using Unmanned Aerial Systems Within the Homeland: Security Game Changer.

Professor Todd Humphreys testified [PDF] about how he and his team "repeatedly took control" of a civilian drone from a remote hilltop at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico in front of Homeland Security and FAA officials. He had previously expressed concerns that spoofing GPS on a drone "is just another way of hijacking a plane" and crashing the hacked drone into another plane or into a building. At the hearing, Humphreys said, "Constructing from scratch a sophisticated GPS spoofer like the one developed by the University of Texas is not easy. It is not within the capability of the average person on the street, or even the average Anonymous hacker. But the emerging tools of software-defined radio and the availability of GPS signal simulators are putting spoofers within reach of ordinary malefactors."


Submission + - The nuclear approach to climate change ( 2

Harperdog writes: "A new roundtable at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists explores the question of whether nuclear energy is the answer to climate change, particularly in developing countries where energy needs are so great. This roundtable, like the ones before it, will be translated into Chinese, Arabic, and Spanish within a week of each article's publication. Here's a summary: "From desertification in China to glacier melt in Nepal to water scarcity in South Africa, climate change is beginning to make itself felt in the developing world. As developing countries search for ways to contain carbon emissions while also maximizing economic potential, a natural focus of attention is nuclear power. But nuclear energy presents its own dangers. Below, Wang Haibin of China, Anthony Turton of South Africa, and Hira Bahadur Thapa of Nepal answer this question: "Given nuclear energy's potential to slow global warming, do its benefits outweigh its risks, or do its risks outweigh its benefits for developing countries?""

Bell Labs Unix -- Reach out and grep someone.