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Comment: Possible backlash over Prop 8 support (Score 5, Informative) 112

by CritterNYC (#46568749) Attached to: JavaScript Inventor Brendan Eich Named New CEO of Mozilla

Comment: Re:Has Rackspace had any outages in 10 years or so (Score 5, Informative) 182

by CritterNYC (#44673289) Attached to: Dark Day In the AWS Cloud: Big Name Sites Go Down
It depends which data center you're in. PortableApps.com has been hosted at Rackspace for years and we had multiple major outtages due to ongoing power issues in the Dallas data center in 2009. The switch from grid to ups was failing and would take the whole wing of the data center out with every server crashing hard. It would take quite a while to come back up. Then we'd have to wait hours for the Rackspace folks to rebuild our corrupted database (fully managed account on a dedicated server). It happened two weekends in a row in June and one other time if I recall correctly, basically costing us a full day of downtime each time.

Comment: $575- 16GB, mid-range CPU, AT&T-only 32GB/colo (Score 5, Informative) 120

by CritterNYC (#44452255) Attached to: Hands On With Motorola's Moto X
It's $575 for the 16GB ($630 for the 32GB which is AT&T only at present) and no microSD so you're locked to that size. The customizations options are similarly on the worst-rated carrier in the US, AT&T. T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon get a black or white 16GB version. That's it. It's $199 for the 16GB one on a 2 year contract, which is the same as you'd pay for a top-tier phone like the HTC One 32GB or the Samsung Galaxy S4 16GB (with microSD so you can add up to 64GB more space on the cheap).

Comment: about:config, NoScript, etc, etc, etc (Score 1) 326

by CritterNYC (#44165481) Attached to: Firefox Takes the Performance Crown From Chrome
As always, you can disable it yourself within about:config. Or use an extension like NoScript, etc to disable it per-site. You likely knew this and were trolling as most folks who are whining about this setting change are. Mozilla is removing the disable JavaScript box from Options as a browser without JS turned on is pretty useless today. A ton of sites won't work right. Most web developers don't even bother to check for JS being disabled anymore, nor should they as JS exists everywhere and in every modern phone browser, too. And the 2m people running NoScript no enough to enable JS when a website doesn't work.

Comment: Re:Firefox only? (Score 1) 77

by CritterNYC (#43625215) Attached to: Epic and Mozilla Bring HTML5 OpenGL Demo To the Browser
If you'd read the links, you'd know that this is new technology being created by the Mozilla folks and being debuted in Firefox first. It's open source (as would be expected from Mozilla) and available to every other browser maker. It uses a subset of JavaScript that's specially compiled to run very fast in the optimized Firefox engine. It's still valid JavaScript, though, so it will run in other browsers, just slower. Some browsers like Chrome can't handle it and crash at the moment. There's already a feature request to add this into Chrome/Chromium. And, since it is in Firefox, it'll be in Firefox OS as well, making gaming on Firefox OS cell phones more of a possibility than it was before.

Comment: Re:I have a better idea... (Score 1) 649

by winnetou (#42817347) Attached to: Richard Stallman's Solution To 'Too Big To Fail'

Do you really picture some bank executive walking away sobbing and destitute when the bank crumbles? Even without further employment these people will be wealthy their entire lives. Even with the ability to 'raid their trust funds' or other monetary penalties, do you really believe that the wealthy don't know how to hide their money?

Don't let the criminals walk away: throw them into jail for gambling with other peoples money.

Comment: Same Bugs as Firefox 64-bit (Score 3, Informative) 209

by CritterNYC (#42370909) Attached to: Mozilla Brings Back Firefox 64-Bit For Windows Nightly Builds
Waterfox is just Firefox built as 64-bit with some compiler switches and a name change (required by trademark guidelines). It's not a fork and there are no additional bug fixes. It has all the bugs that Firefox does when compiled as a 64-bit binary. You're far better off sticking with Firefox 32-bit which works just fine under 64-bit Windows.

Comment: Re:Apple HAS browser competition! (Score 1) 251

by CritterNYC (#42203621) Attached to: Android Options Mean "Best" Browsers Might Surprise You
Why would Mozilla invest the time and resources into a platform owned by a company that's completely hostile to competition and openness? Not to mention the small number of jailbroken iOS devices makes it a losing proposition. They could do it to prove a point, but that would be a very expensive point considering the effort to port Firefox to Objective C.

Comment: Re:Apple HAS browser competition! (Score 3, Interesting) 251

by CritterNYC (#42203599) Attached to: Android Options Mean "Best" Browsers Might Surprise You
Sorry, that's not Chrome. It's Safari with a Chrome skin, just like all the other "browsers" in the app store. And, like all Safari skinned browsers, it uses the purposely slower Safari rendering mode so that mobile Safari looks better. There is one exception in the app store, and that's Opera Mini. To get around this rule, Opera has a server farm in the cloud rendering pages and JavaScript and sending the results down to the Opera Mini clients. It's inefficient and doesn't work as well as a native browser, but it's the only way to "compete" with Apple. Oh yeah, and the whole Opera Mini client is designed for dumb phones that lack the power to run a real browser.

Comment: Re:Hey, Apple has browser competition! (Score 4, Informative) 251

by CritterNYC (#42203583) Attached to: Android Options Mean "Best" Browsers Might Surprise You
Not sure if trolling or clueless. On the off chance you are clueless, Apple doesn't permit competing browsers in their app store. They sneakily did this by banning all interpreted code (for 'security reasons'). That means no JavaScript. And a browser is mostly useless on the modern internet without JavaScript. So, the only thing you can do with a browser on iOS is to wrap Safari in a skin. But, surprise, Apple screws you there, too, because they give you a slower engine in that mode. So, every single browser on iOS is just a Safari skin and they all run slower than Safari. Hurray for Apple's walled garden. There is one exception in the app store, and that's Opera Mini. To get around this rule, Opera has a server farm in the cloud rendering pages and JavaScript and sending the results down to the Opera Mini clients. It's inefficient and doesn't work as well as a native browser, but it's the only way to "compete" with Apple. Oh yeah, and the whole Opera Mini client is designed for dumb phones that lack the power to run a real browser.

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