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Comment Re:The real Bill Gates of India (Score 1) 82

Waaaah businessmen are mean poopyheads!!! Are you nerds really so naive that you think that almost all successful CEOs aren't equally as ruthless? You don't succeed in business by being a wimp.

What I meant was one wouldn't brag about being like Gates if more knew his tactics. Perhaps ruthlessness is a necessary evil of a modern society, but people should at least be aware that it's being used.

Note I admire Steve Jobs far more than Gates because Jobs had a nose for what FUTURE consumers and movie goers would want (even though he was a still a jerk). Microsoft merely purchased or copied good existing products made by other co's and bundled them together.

Comment Re:Cost of access is key. (Score 1) 329

we don't know the reasons the Polynesians expanded. It is highly doubtful a lone couple of polynesians set sail on the high seas to find new islands. The amount of provisioning and boat building...analogous to modern government sponsorship

What's even more likely is that tribes who lost a war were tied into their own boats with meager rations and set to drift at sea. Most probably died, but a few got lucky. Perhaps this was part of a ritual.

Comment Re:The real Bill Gates of India (Score 2) 82

A lot of non-IT people don't know what a jerk Gates was. He was brilliant at killing off competitors using targeted sell-at-loss campaigns, bait-and-switch "standards", bundling, and locking one in to product upgrade cycles.

But that stagnated business software evolution and robbed the market of choice. I bet he'd make a great military general.

Comment David Edmundson answers your questions (Score 5, Interesting) 709

All of your questions are easily answered by reading the link provided at the top of the article:

Why does the desktop care who's booted it up?

The Init System "We don't care. It doesn't affect us."

logind Allows KDE to provide user-switching features.

Device Management Allows KDE to have access to your mouse and keyboard without root access and without random applications being able to sniff your keystrokes.

Inhibitor Locks Allows KDE to react to notifications like "the system is about to go down" and delay until a condition is met (example: delay a suspend until the lock screen is displayed and all your desktop windows are hidden behind the lock screen).

timedated and Friends Allows KDE to set time and date without root; allows KDE apps to be notified if time and date gets changed. (KDE currently runs a daemon just to watch for time and date changes, and they would like to get rid of this daemon and simplify their code.)

User Units If KDE takes advantage of the "units" in systemd, then when any part of KDE crashes or hangs, systemd will restart the misbehaving part.

that implies they won't work on *BSD at all. Right?

"Projects like [SystemBSD] bring the interfaces we need to BSD and as it gets more stable we should be able to start distributing features."

So really, choice is being taken away clear across the board. Either that or I'm missing something really big which implies systemd is not a strict dependency.

I encourage you to read the whole article and see what big things you are missing.

I don't know about you, but when I read that article I didn't think "Man those KDE guys are idiots, why would they want any of that." It all makes sense to me.

It's easier for me to believe that SystemD has some merit than to believe that all the Debian core developers are idiots, plus all the Ubuntu developers, and now all the KDE developers and for that matter the Gnome developers.

My biggest concerns with systemd are the monoculture of it all, so projects like UselessD and SystemBSD sound great to me. Force the SystemD guys to document and justify everything, and provide alternatives.

Comment "Doc" Smith's utlimate vacuum tube (Score 2) 106

About 70 years ago, E. E. "Doc" Smith wrote a series of books that are wonderful space opera: the "Lensman" series. The space battles just keep escalating throughout the series, getting more over-the-top.

My favorite plot point: they used the principles of a vacuum tube to make a device whose pieces included grids mounted in the asteroid belt, with more in other orbits closer in to the sun. In effect they turned the inner Solar System into one honking big vacuum tube, and created a weapon that could concentrate a significant fraction of the sun's output onto attacking enemy fleets. This was called the "Sunbeam". (Believe it or not, this wasn't the end of the escalation. The battles got even bigger after that.)

When you say "ultimate" vacuum tube, I think that one is pretty hard to top.

P.S. 200-word crossover fan fiction: what would have happened if the Battlestar Galactica reboot show had found Earth, and it was the Earth of the Lensman series?

When I was a teen and read those books, I just enjoyed them, but now I'm thinking that it would take a lot of trust to allow Kimball Kinnison to run around acting as judge, jury, and executioner. As readers of the books, we know that he was vetted as deeply as anyone could be by the Arisians, so he can be trusted with that kind of power; but it would be hard for the ordinary people in the world of the books to trust him that much.

Comment Re:what happened with computers? (Score 2) 329

If rockets were in any way physically analogous to computers, a Saturn V today would be the same height as the width of a human hair and still lift...

And Armstrong's famous footstep speech would be hacked and replaced by a plug for boner-pills.

"If you want a giant leap in your trousers..."

In short*, be careful what you ask for.

* No pun intended

Comment Re:what happened with computers? (Score 1) 329

now the military is buying the same tech as everyone else because it's better than their custom made stuff.

That's not entirely true. Often the difference is simply not enough to justify the huge price difference.

For example, a $500 "battle grade" hammer may be able to survive being run over by a tank during battle, but is that really worth the extra $460, or is it better to live with occasional flattened hammers and spend the $460 elsewhere.

2 pints = 1 Cavort