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First Person Shooters (Games)

Halo 2 Online Preservation Effort Ends 201

Posted by Soulskill
from the good-show dept.
A couple weeks ago, we discussed news that some dedicated Halo 2 fans were keeping the game's multiplayer alive after support for online play was dropped. Now, a few days shy of a month after support ended, the last users have been knocked off the server. "[A user named] Apache N4SIR outlasted everyone. 'May 11th @ 0158hrs I was FORCEFULLY REMOVED!!' he wrote on the forums at Bungie.net. 'I thought I'd be the one turning off the lights but that was done for me. Good night everyone, my Elite needs a rest.' His last comrade in arms, Agent Windex, was still signed on, as spotted by Kotaku at 4 p.m. US Pacific Time on May 10, but their adventure, which began on April 15, ended after Windex announced 21 minutes later that he had been removed from play and Apache N4SIR suffered a similar fate hours later, as he described in his post."

Comment: Resources to learn more about the market? (Score 1) 180

by Crimsonjade (#32152042) Attached to: House Calls For Hearing On Stock Market "Glitch"
This event has persuaded me to learn more about the stock market. I know slightly more than the average American. Can anyone recommend good resources to start from? I am already reading some blogs listed here and will look at Google and Amazon to books, but I would appreciate some recommendations here too.

Comment: Re:One of the problems with fixed release dates (Score 1) 320

by Crimsonjade (#31935796) Attached to: Ubuntu LTS Experiences X.org Memory Leak
While you are sitting in your ivory tower, consider that every major product out there has probably included a backported feature patch late in beta (likely more than once). Most of the time we never even realize it. I actually applaud them for openly stating they have a problem and taking steps to resolve it.

Comment: Re:At least part of this is google's fault (Score 1) 187

by Crimsonjade (#31865094) Attached to: Google Says Spam Volumes On the Rise
This isn't a bug. No one except Google knows for sure how they determine whether a message is spam, but it appears that each sender is assigned a score. If that score is low it gets bulked. People clicking "Report as Spam" lowers the score, while clicking "Not Spam" increases the score. Thus, the more people click an email as spam the more likely it will be bulked.

Comment: Re:Remember, slashdot is run by rich white guys (Score 1) 191

by Crimsonjade (#31047734) Attached to: The New National Health Plan Is Texting
You act like it is a zero-sum game. The "the impoverished family down the street's daughter" can get the same treatment as GP via subsidized cost. Any national health care system will have opt-out policy too. So anyone with money will continue to get a higher standard of health care. This is the main complaint I hear from England all the time. The best doctors and care are still only accessible to those with money.

Comment: Re:Wrong all wrong (Score 2, Insightful) 434

by Crimsonjade (#29244649) Attached to: Highly-Paid Developers As ScrumMasters?
The gp is talking about code quality and you are countering his argument with an anecdote on testing? Code quality means people are not doing things that make the code impossible/very difficult to maintain. Things like keeping business logic separate from the view logic.

In regards to your post: Why can't you run the entire test suite each evening if it takes that long? If you are developing some portion of the code, then run a subset of tests that directly relate to that code before you commit. Doesn't seem like a real problem.

Comment: Re:Wrong all wrong (Score 1) 434

by Crimsonjade (#29244589) Attached to: Highly-Paid Developers As ScrumMasters?

- the bad focus: if you focus on the code quality or on Agile methods, you lose the goal which is to code faster. We have such a focus on code quality that any simple task requires days to code. It's ridiculous.

Strange, I thought the goal was to break things to small, manageable tasks. If any simple task requires days to code, regardless of the level of code quality, then your tasks are too large. I follow Cockburn's approach to development: the use case breaks the problem down into very small chunks that I can then implement. In regards to project timelines and code quality: Using shortcuts and hacks may get the initial part of the project moving along, but it will come to bite you later on when there are additional requirements and bugs.

Comment: Re:Bye, bye. (Score 2, Insightful) 881

by Crimsonjade (#28968157) Attached to: Murdoch Says, "We'll Charge For All Our Sites"

Everything these days seems to be obsession with Free Free Free because there's some expection that selling advertising space is the best way to construct a stable world wide web.

I don't think the main concern is a stable web. The concern for most companies is how to generate profit. Plenty of companies have proved that providing free content with advertisements is a viable business model. I don't think many rational people are arguing it works for every facet of business on the internet though. The competition in the marketplace is main force that is driving these services to be free. If a service like Twitter started charging, another company would quickly offer the same service for free. As a consumer, I like this. I don't really care if someone cannot figure out a way to make money off of Twitter. I want the most benefit for the least cost. Getting the most benefit does not always mean free though. I choose to pay Google to provide their email client for a small business. There are plenty of free email clients, but I think GMail is worth the cost. When the services you mention start giving some sort of benefit over the competition, then they can start charging consumers.

"Just think of a computer as hardware you can program." -- Nigel de la Tierre

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