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Comment Re:Improving data [Re:The Gods] (Score 1, Insightful) 385

I'm not sure what your point is. The way science works is that scientists are constantly improving their work. You would be more worried if they didn't upgrade their data analysis methods from time to time.

There's a vast difference between improving your analysis and dropping data you don't like.

Submission + - Elon Musk's growing empire is fueled by government subsidies (latimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: ntrepreneur Elon Musk has built a multibillion-dollar fortune running companies that make electric cars, sell solar panels and launch rockets into space.

And he's built those companies with the help of billions in government subsidies.

Tesla Motors Inc., SolarCity Corp. and Space Exploration Technologies Corp., known as SpaceX, together have benefited from an estimated $4.9 billion in government support, according to data compiled by The Times. The figure underscores a common theme running through his emerging empire: a public-private financing model underpinning long-shot start-ups.

Submission + - Rosetta team proposes landing on comet to finish mission

schwit1 writes: Rather than simply turn off the spacecraft when its funding runs out at the end of 2015, Rosetta's science team have proposed that the mission get a nine month extension, during which they will slowly spiral into the comet and gently land.

Their proposal is similar to what American scientists did with their NEAR spacecraft, which hadn't been designed to land on an asteroid but was successfully eased onto the surface of Eros, where it operated for a very short time.

Submission + - Carly Fiorina Calls Apple's Tim Cook a 'Hypocrite' on Gay Rights

HughPickens.com writes: David Knowles reports at Bloomberg that former Hewlett-Packard CEO and potential 2016 presidential candidate Carly Fiorina called out Apple CEO Tim Cook as a hypocrite for criticizing Indiana and Arkansas over their Religious Freedom Restoration Acts while at the same time doing business in countries where gay rights are non-existent. “When Tim Cook is upset about all the places that he does business because of the way they treat gays and women, he needs to withdraw from 90% of the markets that he’s in, including China and Saudi Arabia,” Fiorina said. “But I don’t hear him being upset about that.”

In similar criticism of Hillary Clinton on the Fox News program Hannity, Fiorina argued that Clinton's advocacy on behalf of women was tarnished by donations made to the Clinton Foundation from foreign governments where women's rights are not on par with those in America. ""I must say as a woman, I find it offensive that Hillary Clinton travels the Silicon Valley, a place where I worked for a long time, and lectures Silicon Valley companies on women's rights in technology, and yet sees nothing wrong with taking money from the Algerian government, which really denies women the most basic human rights. This is called, Sean, hypocrisy." While Hillary Clinton hasn't directly addressed Fiorina's criticisms, her husband has. “You’ve got to decide, when you do this work, whether it will do more good than harm if someone helps you from another country,” former president Bill Clinton said in March. “And I believe we have done a lot more good than harm. And I believe this is a good thing.”

Submission + - A pdf reader that lets you read a screen full at a time? 4

blackest_k writes: Ok here is the problem I can't fit a whole page of a pdf file on screen the document is tall and my screen is wide. So I set zoom to page width, if i scroll by page around 2/3rds of the page is skipped. The only other ways are pressing the down arrow for every line or trying to use the scroll bar which a slight slip can move you + or — 50 pages.

What i'm looking for is a pdf reader that can break a pdf page into screen size chunks and give me a shortcut key to go to the next chunk. So I can read it as i would a book. Does anyone have a reader that works for pdf files.

Submission + - Well, That Didn't Work: The Segway (wired.com) 1

turkeydance writes: We were all supposed to be riding Segways by now. The company was supposed to be rolling in cash, the scooter’s inventor a modern day Jay Gatsby (minus the bootlegging and murder). It didn’t happen: Today, the Segway is a punch line, a way for mall security guards to prevent sore feet. So what happened?

It’s not that it didn’t work: Envisioned as a way for people to get from home to work in urban areas, the Segway is a technological marvel. It can maintain its balance better than a human and is much more fuel efficient than a car, which are a pain to drive and park over a short journey. No, the problems that sank the Segway weren’t technological. They were social.

Submission + - Congressman, Who Is MIT Alum, Says US Patent System Should Be Strengthened (courier-journal.com)

SonicSpike writes: Congressman Thomas Massie (R-KY) writes in an op-ed:

"As a small inventor and holder of 29 patents, I care deeply about innovation and its role in our economy. Unfortunately, the Innovation Act, which in 2013 passed the House but stalled in the Senate, is back. This bill, which proposes changes to our patent system, would pose a serious threat to the American inventor and extinguish creativity and invention.

In my opinion, the Innovation Act threatens American inventors, particularly individual inventors and those working at small businesses and startups. The bill attempts to “fix” a few isolated abuses of the patent system, but instead it sets forth a comprehensive overhaul of the existing legal framework that compromises the rights of all legitimate inventors.

Perhaps the most troubling aspect of the Innovation Act is the provision that makes it easier for corporations to keep shipping products even if a court finds reason to believe those products contain stolen inventions. When deciding whether to pay a fair license fee to the rightful inventors, or whether to steal a patented idea and risk a lawsuit, it is the threat of lost revenue that keeps the big companies honest."

Read the rest at the link...

Submission + - MIT Climate Scientist Dismisses Global Warming Alarmists (breitbart.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Breitbart reports, "An MIT professor of meteorology is dismissing global-warming alarmists ... Last week, government agencies including NASA announced that 2014 was the “hottest year” in “recorded history,” as The New York Times put it in an early edition. Last year has since been demoted by the Times to the hottest “since record-keeping began in 1880.” But that may not be true. Now the same agencies have acknowledged that there’s only a 38 percent chance that 2014 was the hottest year on record. And even if it was, it was only by two-100ths of a degree. Lindzen scoffs at the public-sector-generated hysteria, which included one warmist blogger breathlessly writing that the heat record had been “shattered.” “Seventy percent of the earth is oceans, we can’t measure those temperatures very well. They can be off a half a degree, a quarter of a degree. Even two-10ths of a degree of change would be tiny but two-100ths is ludicrous. Anyone who starts crowing about those numbers shows that they’re putting spin on nothing.” ... Lindzen said he was fortunate to have gained tenure just as the “climate change” movement was beginning, because now non-believers are often ostracized in academia. In his career he has watched the hysteria of the 1970’s over “global cooling” morph into “global warming.”"

Submission + - Antiquated 'Pole Box' Net Beats 911 on Fire Call (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: Two Canton, Mass., teenagers spot a building on fire Saturday night. One calls 911 and the other pulls a nearby “pole box.” Canton police report how that went: “Care to venture a guess on what worked the quickest? If you said the ‘pole box’ you are correct! Although numerous 911 calls did eventually come in reporting the fire, the Canton Fire Department was already enroute because those old boxes communicate directly with Canton Fire Alarm.” Score one for old-school tech.

Submission + - http://news.dice.com/2014/10/16/game-developers-labor-of-love/ (dice.com)

Nerval's Lobster writes: With "GamerGate" and all the debates over who counts as a "gamer," it's easy to forget that games are created by people with a genuine love of the craft. Journalist Jon Brodkin sat down with Armin Ibrisagic, game designer & PR manager for Coffee Stain Studios, the Swedish studio that made Goat Simulator, to talk about why they built that game and how it turned into such a success. Brodkin also talked to Leszek Lisowski, founder of Wastelands Interactive, about the same topic. While these developers might debate with themselves (and others) over whether to develop games for hardcore gamers, or jump on the mobile "casual gaming" bandwagon, they'll ultimately in it because they love games — a small but crucial detail that seems too easy to forget these days.

Submission + - Security vendors claim progress against Chinese group that hacked Google (computerworlduk.com)

daten writes: A group of security companies say a collaborative effort has helped counter several hacking tools used by a China-based group most known for provoking strong condemnation from Google four years ago. Novetta, which spearheaded the effort, said a comprehensive technical report on the action, called "Operation SMN," will be released on Oct. 28., although some details were released by Symantec in a blog post Tuesday. The hackers, referred to as "Hidden Lynx" by Symantec, are believed to have been behind "Operation Aurora," a famous cyberespionage campaign revealed in early 2010 that compromised as many as 20 companies.

Submission + - The CDC Is Carefully Controlling How Scared You Are About Ebola 2

HughPickens.com writes: Russell Berman writes in the Atlantic that the Obama administration is trying to navigate a tricky course: Can officials increase public vigilance about the deadly virus without inciting a panic? "Ebola is scary. It's a deadly disease. But we know how to stop it," says Dr. Thomas Frieden, the CDC director. speaking "calmly and clearly, sticking to an even pitch and avoiding the familiar political image of the whip-smart fast-talker." International groups wanted the US to step in sooner to help fight the outbreak in west Africa, while more recently some Republicans have called on the administration to ban travel from the most affected countries but Frieden and other officials say such a move would be counterproductive, citing lessons learned from the SARS outbreak a decade ago. "The SARS outbreak cost the world more than $40 billion, but it wasn't to control the outbreak," says Frieden. "Those were costs from unnecessary and ineffective travel restrictions and trade changes that could have been avoided." The government announced Wednesday that it was stepping up protective measures at five airports, where authorities will screen travelers from Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea with targeted questions and fever checks, an action, officials acknowledge that was taken not only to stop the spread of the disease but simply to make people feel safer. According to Berman the message, it seems to be, is this: Be afraid of Ebola. Just not too afraid.

Submission + - Solar and Wind power are the most expensive.

turkeydance writes: A new study from the Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank, argues that using solar and wind energy may be the most expensive alternatives to carbon-based electricity generation, even though they require no expenditures for fuel.....Specifically, this means nuclear power offers a savings of more than $400,000 worth of carbon emissions per megawatt of capacity. Solar saves only $69,000 and wind saves $107,000.

Submission + - Popular Android apps full 'o bugs - researchers blame recycling of code (itnews.com.au)

Brett W writes: The security researchers that first published the 'Heartbleed' vulnerabilities in OpenSSL have spent the last few months auditing the Top 50 downloaded Android apps for vulnerabilities and have found issues with at least half of them. Many send user data to ad networks without consent, potentially without the publisher or even the app developer being aware of it. Quite a few also send private data across the network in plain text. The full study is due out later this week.

"What people have been reduced to are mere 3-D representations of their own data." -- Arthur Miller