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Cloud

Don't Be a Server Hugger! (Video) 409

Posted by Roblimo
from the old-stewball-was-the-most-loyal-server-horse-we-ever-done-had dept.
Curtis Peterson says admins who hang onto their servers instead of moving into the cloud are 'Server Huggers,' a term he makes sound like 'Horse Huggers,' a phrase that once might have been used to describe hackney drivers who didn't want to give up their horse-pulled carriages in favor of gasoline-powered automobiles. Curtis is VP of Operations for RingCentral, a cloud-based VOIP company, so he's obviously made the jump to the cloud himself. And he has reassuring words for sysadmins who are afraid the move to cloud-based computing is going to throw them out of work. He says there are plenty of new cloud computing opportunities springing up for those who have enough initiative and savvy to grab onto them, by which he obviously means you, right?

Comment: Re:Here is some information you may want to know (Score 1) 180

by CrAlt (#46833801) Attached to: Anonymous' Airchat Aim: Communication Without Need For Phone Or Internet

On 1, how honest is the "it will interfere with emergency services" reason? I've heard police in particular have unofficially switched to cell phones for sensitive information.

It is honest. Public safety is all up in VHF,UHF, and the 700/800mhz bands. Other then going to digital voice (P25 mostly) there hasn't been much change in the tech. Its just radio.

Cops may use cellphones for sensitive stuff but dispatch and calls for help still use radio. Ambulances still use normal radios and "MED" channels in the clear to talk to doctors on the way to hospitals. FD's use normal low power portables while on site working a fire. If they get stuck that is how they call for help.
If a boater needs help he is still going to call the coastguard on VHF.

There are digital trunking systems that hop around on a SET number of channels but they can still be interfered with if something is operating on their band like anything else.

There are bands like FRS,GMRS,CB,etc that you can mess around on and no one will care. The 27mhz CB band is a total free for all with guys running messy 2KW stations. Since they are contained down there the FCC doesn't care. This would be the best place to play around in IMO.. right in the middle of all the other chaos.

No good will come of messing around on public safety bands. It will get you noticed very quickly and may actually interfere with an emergency call.

You can look up what your area uses on sites like http://www.radioreference.com/...
Its all public info and licensed by the FCC.

Comment: Pace/2wire all listen on 3479/tcp (Score 3, Insightful) 236

by CrAlt (#46811861) Attached to: Intentional Backdoor In Consumer Routers Found

The 2wire/pace (3600,3800,etc) all have TCP port 3479 open to the internet.This is what you are forced to use if you have AT&T U-verse. There is no way to block it and AT&T says its for "updates and trouble shooting".
http://forums.att.com/t5/forum...

I wonder what great backdoors are in these gateways?

+ - One week of OpenSSL cleanup ->

Submitted by CrAlt
CrAlt (3208) writes "After the news of heartbleed broke early last week, the OpenBSD team dove in and started axing it up into shape. Leading this effort are Ted Unangst (tedu@) and Miod Vallat (miod@), who are head-to-head on a pure commit count basis with both having around 50 commits in this part of the tree in the week since Ted's first commit in this area. They are followed closely by Joel Sing (jsing@) who is systematically going through every nook and cranny and applying some basic KNF. Next in line are Theo de Raadt (deraadt@) and Bob Beck (beck@) who've been both doing a lot of cleanup, ripping out weird layers of abstraction for standard system or library calls.

Then Jonathan Grey (jsg@) and Reyk Flöter (reyk@) come next, followed by a group of late starters. Also, an honorable mention for Christian Weisgerber (naddy@), who has been fixing issues in ports related to this work.

All combined, there've been over 250 commits cleaning up OpenSSL. In one week. Some of these are simple or small changes, while other commits carry more weight. Of course, occasionally mistakes get made but these are also quickly fixed again, but the general direction is clear: move the tree forward towards a better, more readable, less buggy crypto library.

Check them out at http://anoncvs.estpak.ee/cgi-b..."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Hmmm ... (Score 1) 139

by CrAlt (#46776219) Attached to: Industry-Wide Smartphone "Kill Switch" Closer To Reality

This will be used to shut down protests and stifle dissent.

I disagree. "The Man" does not need any killswitch to cut off protesters. He only has to shut off the cell sites in the target area.
. Also if you brick the cellphone you can no longer track it. It would make more sense to block all traffic but leave the phones connected to the network and track them. This way to know WHO is there and where they are going.

I do agree that sooner or later it will get hacked. Imagine what would happen to ATT or VZN if every smartphone on their networked got bricked.

The Internet

How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion 1037

Posted by timothy
from the randi-does-miracles dept.
pitchpipe (708843) points out a study highlighted by MIT's Technology Review, which makes the bold claim that "Using the Internet can destroy your faith. That's the conclusion of a study showing that the dramatic drop in religious affiliation in the U.S. since 1990 is closely mirrored by the increase in Internet use," and writes "I attribute my becoming an atheist to the internet, so what the study is saying supports my anecdote. If I hadn't been exposed to all of the different arguments about religion, etc., via the internet I would probably just be another person who identifies as religious but doesn't attend services. What do you think? Have you become more religious, less religious, or about the same since being on the internet? What if you've always had it?"
Google

New Australian Privacy Laws Could Have Ramifications On Google Glass 128

Posted by samzenpus
from the glass-half-empty dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Recording private conversations or activities using Google's Glass eyewear or similar wearable technologies without consent could become illegal under a push to overhaul Australian state and federal privacy laws. From the article: 'The Australian Law Reform Commission discussion paper, released on Monday morning, recommended 47 legislative changes aimed at updating existing privacy laws for the digital age. It proposed the government introduce a statutory cause of action for a serious invasion of one’s privacy, in what would be the first time a person’s privacy has legally been protected in Australia. It also recommended harmonising rules for using technology to monitor and record authors, which are currently legislated by state governments, to deal with the implications of new technologies such as wearable devices and drones.'"
Businesses

White House: Get ACA Insurance Coverage, Launch Start-Ups 578

Posted by timothy
from the have-your-neighbors-pay-the-rent-too dept.
dcblogs writes that the Obama Administration is urging tech entrepreneurs "to sign up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, and said having the coverage will give them the 'freedom and security' to start their own businesses. 'There is strong evidence that when affordable healthcare isn't exclusively tied to employment, in more instances people choose to start their own companies,' wrote White House CTO Todd Park in a post to launch its #GeeksGetCovered campaign. Bruce Bachenheimer, a professor of management at Pace University and director of its Entrepreneurship Lab, said the effort is part of a broader appeal by the White House to get younger and healthier people to sign-up for Obamacare, and is in the same vein as President Obama's recent appearance on Between Two Ferns." Removing the tax structures that make companies by default intermediaries in the provision of health insurance, and allowing more interstate (and international) competition in health finance options would help on that front, too, aside from who's actually footing the insurance bill.
Crime

Woman Attacked In San Francisco Bar For Wearing Google Glass 921

Posted by timothy
from the asking-for-it dept.
First time accepted submitter Martin Blank writes "Sarah Slocum, an early adopter of Google Glass, was bar hopping with friends in San Francisco when a few people in the bar took issue with the eyewear when she was demonstrating it to another patron even though she wasn't recording. When she felt threatened, she informed them that she would start recording. Two of them approached her, yelling and throwing a bar rag at her, and ultimately ripping the Glass from her face and running from the bar with it. She gave chase and eventually got the Glass back, but her purse was gone when she returned to the bar. This physical level of hostility is unusual, but discomfort with Glass is common, especially among those who don't understand how it works. Given that much more hidden spy cameras are available for far less than the $1500 cost of Glass, what will it take for general acceptance to finally take hold?"
Input Devices

Ask Slashdot: Should I Get Google Glass? 421

Posted by timothy
from the well-are-you-a-stone-thrower? dept.
lunatick writes "I put in my application for Google Glass as a joke. I never figured I would be selected. Well in less than one week I got my invite to buy Google Glass. My main hold back is the $1500 price tag for a device that just seems to be a camera and navigation aid. Does anyone in the /. community have Google Glass and can they give some advice to the rest of us considering it?"

APL is a write-only language. I can write programs in APL, but I can't read any of them. -- Roy Keir

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