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Comment: Well on the bright side... (Score 1) 2219

by Cprossu (#46196487) Attached to: Slashdot Tries Something New; Audience Responds!
At least it's not like Google:

<TheGoogleExperience>
"Hey, here's a new great idea we formed a focus group to come up with and we think you'll just love it"

*clicks "Switch back temporarily" *

"Hey, we noticed you clicked "Switch back temporarily" Will you tell us why?"

*Fills out survey why I don't like the new gmail layout, why the new interface is clunky or impossible to use due to menu items being filed away places you'd never think to look, why the interface now takes twice as long to load, why I don't want to add a G+ account, why I want to remove the g+ account that I didn't know would be added by clicking continue and needing to transfer it to another account in order to remove it but needing to wait two weeks for the privilege of doing so, youtube being permalinked to my gmail account, the new compose, the youtube comments being attached to G+ for no reason at all, my youtube logging out when I log out of gmail, G+, etc*

*Swtich back temporarily gets removed and you get stuck with whatever you didn't like*

*Reads google groups post about the 'new feature becoming standard for everyone' noting the 150,000 dislikes and 37 likes

*Tries greasemonkey scripts that reconfigure the pages on the fly to what they should have been in the first place noted and advertised in said google groups post 1/2 way down the list*

*Switches to HTML/compatibility/mobile view only mode by whatever means necessary to gain functionaries lost until they change or disable that too*

*Reads follow up post from google about how happy they are with the changes no one wanted or requested*
</TheGoogleExperience>

So at least I've got my simple functional slashdot back for the moment, but if this keeps on being troweled over I'll simply find another site to obsessively check likely written by another unhappy former slashdot reader for other unhappy former slashdot readers.

Comment: Re:Just glad to see them respond! (Score 1) 163

Not at all! heck the most analog paths are usually the most exploitable (man writing a copy of another written piece).

The point I was trying to make wasn't that an analog path isn't manipulatable but the fact that with a linear analog path that this kind of unintentional pattern replacement type of manipulation occurring differently though differing documents wouldn't have occurred or really even been possible.

I figured that people here could read in between the lines correctly though; An error in my judgement!

To bust out the old Louisville slugger though, this particular device saved space by taking one or more 'samples' of the document scanned and through some comparative algorithm reused these samples to aid in compression of the file. Probably due to this failing or performing a 99% match on a sample that might have been sampled before or multiple times depending on the circumstances ended up making the incorrect decision on what sample to use where. Thus the document 'copied' in this way is an entirely different piece of work than the one that went in. There is little chance of this happening with an analog signal path because of the linearity... what is there is what is there, not what is here someplace is put somewhere else multiple times in the same document.

Comment: Just glad to see them respond! (Score 1) 163

Back when I saw the first scanner based copiers roll out I'd thought we see something similar to this happen. Whenever you eliminate the analog signal path it becomes much easier to corrupt the thing in unnoticeable ways, even unintentionally! It's clearly the way to go, because of how much complexity it removes, but as soon as you start storing data on a medium and read it back you start having these problems, it only gets worse as you try and conserve that storage medium with compression or other tricks/hacks. It's just a fact of life in the digital age: the tradeoffs are still better than the previous way of doing things. (Well that is unless your name was "Mr. Buttle" and the ministry of information drilled a hole in your ceiling).

I am just really glad to see that Xerox is taking the initiative, working with closely with the person who found the problem, and opening it's doors to others who want to help out. It's all too often that a big company has a big obvious problem with a product and not only doesn't admit there's a problem, but refuses to help or work with those experiencing them.

Comment: Free internet for the skilled/desperate (Score 1) 438

by Cprossu (#44464619) Attached to: Home wireless security level?
I've always believed that wireless is and always has been inherently insecure; any data that goes out on it is fair game. Personally I use a mac whitelist, static ip's, and open node: I figure if they go to the trouble of spoofing my macid, it's associated ip, and manually plug in a dns server (common knowledge for the skilled) that they are entitled to treat themselves to some of the traffic shaped, logged, and timestamped internet along with the isolated network the AP sits on if they so chose.

I mean they must need internet really bad, or really be bored and need a challenge, either way I am happy to help!

Comment: I prefer percolated, you insensitive clod! (Score 1) 584

by Cprossu (#41188165) Attached to: What's your usual coffee-making method?
I have both a 30 cup and a 10 cup percolator, and they make tasty rocket fuel. It's very surprising how different Folgers classic, MJB, and Chock full o' Nuts tastes when thrown through a percolator instead of a drip machine.

I gave up drip years ago when I picked up my 30 cup at an estate sale for $5. I ended up liking it a whole ton because the taste was nice, the caffeine seemed more potent somehow (probably a personal preference or other weirdness because I've read that supposedly percolated coffee is supposed to contain less caffeine than drip?), they keep the coffee nuclear hot and nice all day long, and all my Mr. Coffee did was let the coffee die a slow lukewarm death. Convinced me.

A scoop of grounds per 2 cups, and one extra!

Comment: No complaints here (Score 1) 219

by Cprossu (#35716112) Attached to: AMD Bulldozer Will Bring Socket Shift To PCs
This rig I type from has an Asus M3A32-MVP Deluxe Wifi motherboard....
It also has a Radeon 6870, 4gb ddr2 1066 and a PhenomII 1075T hex core.

It didn't start out that way. I bought this motherboard in either November or December 2007, and it started out life with a Phenom 9500 and a Radeon 3870.

I upgraded it to a PhenomII 805 when I snagged one for $79, and much later a PhenomII 1075T.
The graphics card got an upgrade to the 4870 when it came out and most recently the 6870.
The ram started out as 4GB of DDR2 800 but I later upgraded it to 4GB of DDR2 1066 which I got for $35

The Corsair 520 watt power supply, Antec case, Seagate 750GB hdd, modified cooler master heatsink/fan, and heck even the OS install are all original to this computer with the motherboard.

For the last CPU upgrade I literally updated my bios, shut my computer down, popped the heatsink off, blew it out and cleaned the bottom, popped the old chip out, put the new chip in with a nice layer of ceramique, put my heatsink on, pushed my power button and I was done.

All my old CPU's, graphics cards, and ram ended upgrading computers of my friends and relatives.

Thank you AMD and Asus for putting so much support into your products, especially since I like having my full spec gaming computer without dishing out $1200 each year. The $200 investment in my motherboard has lasted me far longer than I would have imagined.

Comment: Re:Add a TURBO button;, You'll be more than satisf (Score 1) 207

by Cprossu (#32378352) Attached to: Intel Targets AMD With Affordable Unlocked CPUs

Actually the turbo button was for decreasing performance so your "old" applications could run as they intended....

Just marketing got a hold of it and just like the old fridge sized IBM tape drives back in the day that were going to be designed with a "Idle" light instead were granted with a "Ready" light (remember IBM's were never..IDLE!), the "make the machine go slower button so your old stuff runs" became "Push this button and when the light comes on you're running the computer faster than if it wasn't on!"

Comment: The DIY modified yugo argument (Score 1) 207

by Cprossu (#32378102) Attached to: Intel Targets AMD With Affordable Unlocked CPUs

I went through the numbers myself... they don't seem to add up very well as TFA would lead you to believe...

let's first blab about something totally unrelated---

Someone buys a Yugo and does a lot of modifications to it, another buys a stock low-mid range performance car-so something like this:
"How much money have you spent total on your car?"
Yugo boy: I spent $5,000 to buy my car, and $16,000 in modifications
Stock boy: I spent $21,000 to buy my car.

"What kind of gas mileage do you get? (in MPG)"
Yugo boy: I used to get 34MPG before I modified it, now I get 18, and I can only use high octane
Stock boy: I get 18MPG on regular 87 octane

"Compare your cars speed on a generic track with straight aways and turns, be courteous if you can"
Yugo boy: Stock boy's car is faster than mine in turns, but my car out-accelerates him in straightaways.
Stock boy: Yugo's car is faster than mine in straightaways when it's not broken down at the side of the road or if his engine doesn't hiccup, I have the edge in braking and turning.

"How do your cars do for everyday driving?"
Yugo boy: I've removed the power steering for wright and power, the ride is loud, bouncy, and stiff, but that just means I can feel and hear the road better, and if I am at a drive-through or a stop light for an excessive amount of time it might overheat.
Stock boy: I have a comfortable quiet ride with no issues, and my car is easy to drive.

"What do you do when things go wrong?"
Yugo boy: I have to fix it myself, buying any parts that broke.
Stock boy: My car is fully under warranty, and I can have almost any part that broke replaced for free, as long as it wasn't directly my fault.

"What options do you have to make your cars faster?"
Yugo boy: I am maxed out, all I could do is lessen the weight more and buy a different engine, both are extremely expensive to do
Stock boy: There are an array of bolt-ons, computer re-programmers, and other easy modifications I can do to this car to make it faster, quite a few of them don't even void the warranty.

so relating this to computer parts...
setting up 2 rigs almost the same (full atx name brand mobo with at least 2 pcie slots, radeon 5770 graphics, corsair 650watt psu, cooler master case, blu-ray reader, a dvd burner, a 1tb 7200rpm hdd), one with a core i7 920 and 3gb ddr3 1600 ram in tri channel ($1052 with a stock heatsink) and the other with a "new" core i7 875K and 4gb of ddr3 1600 in dual channel ($1062 with an aftermarket heatsink), the "modified yugo" ends up being more expensive than the stock mid range car... For me it's a no brainer, and this isn't even factoring AMD into the equation...

When we look at AMD it ends up being $670 for all the support products (same specs used, full atx brand name mobo with at least 2 pcie slots, radeon 5770 graphics, corsair 650watt psu, cooler master case, blu-ray reader, a dvd burner, a 1tb 7200rpm hdd), 4gb ddr3 1600 in dual channel, which leaves you quite a bit of money to spend on the CPU and heatsink you want, and there are a nice amount of options from $50-$310 depending on the amount of tinkering you want to do to get the performance you are looking for. (which correlates to a price range of $720-$980 without the heatsink.
So depending on the level of AMD tinkering you would want to do you could have $72-$82 differential for the high end AMD chip to spend on cooling/whatnot or if you look at the low end you could have up to $332-$342 differential between those intel options to spend on cooling/whatnot... (so you could do a nice heatsink fan/low level water setup with the high end cpu, or an all-out phase change setup with one of the bargain bin AMD chips)

So my opinion before this was announced and after it was is still the same... if you go intel, socket 1366 is the way to go, if you want a cheap capable rig, AMD has a lot to offer.
Some drastic price cutting could change my opinions though!

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