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Submission + - If we Buck Feta and leave, where should we go? 17

Covalent writes: I am a long-time slashdot reader (don't let the UID fool you), and I agree with most of you that the Beta is a disaster. Dice has promised a fix, but what if this garbage is the new reality? Is there a suitable alternative to slashdot that members would find equally (or more) fulfilling? Is someone going to fork slashdot and start it anew (Taco can you hear me?) Or is this just the end of an era?

Submission + - Black Death Left a Mark on Human Genome (

sciencehabit writes: The Black Death didn’t just wipe out millions of Europeans during the 14th century. It left a mark on the human genome, favoring those who carried certain immune system genes, according to a new study. Those changes may help explain why Europeans respond differently from other people to some diseases and have different susceptibilities to autoimmune disorders.

Submission + - D-Wave Computer's Solution Raises More Questions (

benonemusic writes: The commercially available D-Wave computer, has demonstrated its ability to perform increasingly complex tasks. But is it a real quantum computer? A new round of research continues the debate over how much its calculations owe to exotic quantum-physics phenomena.

Submission + - The Joys of Unethical Behaviour (

sandbagger writes: It’s befuddling why people continue to cheat and plagiarize when the consequences can be so great. (Well, sometimes you get a book deal.) Well, the Journal of Social Psychology has published a study looking into the issue. Participants were given conditions where they could imagine or participate in unethical behaviour. The results from say that sometimes it feels good to be bad.

Submission + - Report: Fisker Automotive Sold To Hong Kong Billionaire Richard Li

cartechboy writes: Its looks like an investor group led by Hong Kong tycoon (and early Fisker investor) Richard Li is the likely winner of a government loan owed by Fisker Automotive, the dormant maker of plug-in hybrid sports cars. Buying the loan would allow Li to try and restructure the company even as its still at risk for bankruptcy. The originally company won a $529 million government loan in 2009, took venture capital investment, and created a lot of buzz around its flagship car, the $100,000 Karma plug-in hybrid. But the company had delays launching the car, struggled financially and has not built any cars since July of 2012. Is Li the new savior?

Submission + - Small-scale biomass energy projects are not a solution to climate change ( 1

Lasrick writes: Roberto Bissio has an excellent piece in a roundtable on biomass energy, pointing out that small scale biomass energy projects designed for people in poor countries aren't really a solution to climate change. After pointing out that patent protections could impede wide-spread adoption, Bissio adds that the people in these countries aren't really contributing to climate change in the first place: 'Why? Because poor people, whose carbon emissions these technologies would reduce, produce very little carbon in the first place. As I mentioned in Round One, the planet's poorest 1 billion people are responsible for only 3 percent of global carbon emissions. The 1.26 billion people whose countries belong to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development account for 42 percent of emissions. The rich, if they reduced their emissions by just 8 percent, could achieve more climate mitigation than the poor could achieve by reducing their emissions to zero. The rich could manage this 8 percent reduction by altering their lifestyles in barely noticeable ways. For the poor, a reduction of 100 percent would imply permanent misery.'

Submission + - DARPA Unveils an Android-based Ground Sensor Device (

DeviceGuru writes: DARPA announced a sensor reference system device based on a new Android-based sensor processing core called the ADAPTable Sensor System (akla ADAPT). The initial ADAPT reference device, called UGS (unattended ground sensor), is designed as the basis for a series of lower-cost, more upgradable sensor devices for military applications. The ADAPT program is part of larger effort by the U.S. military to reduce the costs and speed production schedules for military equipment, using an ODM process similar to that of the commercial smartphone industry. Potential applications for the technology include swarms of hive-mind UAVs or robots, or perimeter security sensors hidden at a deployed airfield or underground, all networked together and capable of transmitting video. What could possibly go wrong!

Submission + - Google launches more photocentric app for Android (

An anonymous reader writes: Google+ is getting serious about photography. As announced last week at I/O, Google's social network is becoming much more image-centric with its latest update. To match the new web version of Google+, Google has released a completely revamped Android app.
Version 4.0 of the app automates many of its features. Google described the new tools in the official announcement:

Submission + - Addicted to Learning? Hardcore MOOC Students Race to Pass Courses (

jyosim writes: Hundreds of people are spending 20 or 30 hours a week just taking free Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs. They're not looking for credit, just a challenge of learning. This Chronicle of Higher Ed story looks at whether these MOOC addicts think they're learning as much as they would in a traditional college course.

Submission + - Larry Page: You Worry Too Much About Medical Privacy ( 1

jfruh writes: Yesterday, Larry Page revealed that he'd been suffering from a vocal cord ailment that impaired his ability to speak for more than a year. The positive feedback he got from opening up about it inspired him to tell attendees at Google I/O that we should all be less uptight about keeping our medical records private. As far as Page is concerned, pretty much the only legitimate reason for worry on this score is fear of being denied health insurance. "Maybe we should change the rules around insurance so that they have to insure people," he said, perhaps unaware that the Obamacare reforms kicking in next year do exactly that.

Submission + - Honeynet Project Researchers Build Publicly Available ICS Honeynet (

msm1267 writes: Conpot, short for Control Honeypot, is one of the first publicly available honeypots for industrial control systems (ICS) and SCADA gear. Built by two researchers from the Honeynet Project, the hope is that others will take what they started, deploy it on their own critical infrastructure networks and share the findings.
“The main goal is to make this kind of technology available for a general audience,” said Lukas Rist, one of the developers. “Not just for security researchers, but also for people who are sysadmins setting up ICS systems who have no clue what could happen and want to see malware attacks against their systems and not put them in any danger,”

Submission + - A New Dawn - Google's Android IDE (

mikejuk writes: Yawn, not much happening at Google I/O this year. Well you can't expect it to be exciting every year. What! What's this — an official Android IDE! It can't be! Why isn't this headline news? OK, I admit I should probably get out more, but while Android Studio hasn't got the wow value of Glass for the general geek it should have a big wow value for any programmer thinking of working with Android.
It is a one package download that gets the beginner started with creating Android apps and has lots of editing and refactoring help. It also has a UI preview option that lets you see what your app looks like on a range of devices and lots more.
The main thing is that it promises to bring Android development into the same class as WP8 with Visual Studio and iOS with XCode.
This really is the way forward not only for Android and Java but all programming environments — More Tools!

Artificial intelligence has the same relation to intelligence as artificial flowers have to flowers. -- David Parnas