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Programming

Ask Slashdot: Best Dedicated Low Power Embedded Dev System Choice? 40

Posted by samzenpus
from the what-should-I-get? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "I'm a Solaris user which is not well supported by the OSS toolchains. I'd like to have a dedicated Linux based dev system which has good support for ARM, MSP430 and other MCU lines and draws very little (5-10 watts max) power. The Beaglebone Black has been suggested. Is there a better choice? This would only be used for software development and testing for embedded systems."
AI

The Lovelace Test Is Better Than the Turing Test At Detecting AI 124

Posted by samzenpus
from the why-did-you-program-me-to-feel-pain? dept.
meghan elizabeth writes If the Turing Test can be fooled by common trickery, it's time to consider we need a new standard. The Lovelace Test is designed to be more rigorous, testing for true machine cognition. An intelligent computer passes the Lovelace Test only if it originates a "program" that it was not engineered to produce. The new program—it could be an idea, a novel, a piece of music, anything—can't be a hardware fluke. The machine's designers must not be able to explain how their original code led to this new program. In short, to pass the Lovelace Test a computer has to create something original, all by itself.
Technology

The Future of Wearables: Standalone, Unobtrusive, and Everywhere 38

Posted by samzenpus
from the computer-clothes dept.
jfruh writes Wearable tech has been a pretty niche product so far, and a widely derided one at that, but moves are in the works to help the category break into the mainstream. One of the biggest irritants is that most wearable devices must pair with a smartphone to actually connect to the Internet — but an AT&T exec says that his company will be selling a standalone wearable by the end of 2014. Google Glass has been a flashpoint of conflict not least because it's extremely obvious; its creator says that subtle, non intrusive versions are coming. And while everyone wonders what Apple's play in this space will be, it may be best to imagine what they're working on as a successor to their fading iPod line.
Moon

Study: Why the Moon's Far Side Looks So Different 40

Posted by samzenpus
from the good-side dept.
StartsWithABang writes 55 years ago, the Soviet probe Luna 3 imaged the side of the Moon that faces away from us for the first time. Surprisingly, there were only two very small maria (dark regions) and large amounts of mountainous terrain, in stark contrast to the side that faces us. This remained a mystery for a very long time, even after we developed the giant impact hypothesis to explain the origin of the Moon. But a new study finally appears to solve the mystery, crediting the heat generated on the near side from a hot, young Earth with creating the differences between the two hemispheres.
Patents

A Brief History of Patenting the Wheel: What Goes Around Comes Around 17

Posted by samzenpus
from the round-and-round dept.
v3rgEz writes Marc Abrahams, founder of the Ig Nobel Prize, has put together a fascinating history of people patenting the wheel, including one inventor that did it to prove how ridiculous Australia's patent system was and another that put wheels on a wheel so it could wheel while it wheels. From the article: "I discovered today that the Australian patent office has — quietly — revoked the patent it granted, in the year 2001, for the wheel. The patent office had awarded Innovation Patent #2001100012 to John Keogh of Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia. Keogh’s application called his invention a “circular transportation facilitation device.” I became acquainted with Mr. Keogh when we awarded him — and the Australian Patent Office — an Ig Nobel Prize, in 2001."

+ - Homestar Runner To Return Soon

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Back in April, Homestar Runner got its first content update in over four years. It was the tiniest of updates and the site went quiet again shortly thereafter, but the Internet’s collective 90s kid heart still jumped for joy...The site’s co-creator, Matt Chapman, popped into an episode of The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show to chat about the history of Homestar — but in the last 15 minutes or so, they get to talking about its future. The too-long-didn’t-listen version: both of the brothers behind the show really really want to bring it back. The traffic they saw from their itty-bitty April update suggests people want it — but they know that may very well be a fluke. So they’re taking it slow."

+ - Microsoft kills off MapPoint and Streets & Trips in favor of Bing Maps 1

Submitted by DroidJason1
DroidJason1 (3589319) writes "Microsoft has killed off two of its mapping products, MapPoint and Streets & Trips. Both of these services have received their last update and will soon be retired in favor of Microsoft's premier mapping product, Bing Maps. The company has yet to go public with a press release announcing the retirement of these two mapping services, but the Redmond giant has quietly mentioned the fate on both the services' websites. MapPoint was first released back in 1999 and made it easier to view, edit, and integrate maps into software. Streets & Trips was a route planning package. Microsoft is now pushing Bing Maps as the service that can do all this and more."

+ - How An Intelligent Thimble Could Replace the Mouse In 3D Virtual Reality Worlds->

Submitted by anguyen8
anguyen8 (3736553) writes "The way in which humans interact with computers has been dominated by the mouse since it was invented in the 1960s by Doug Engelbert. A mouse uses a flat two-dimensional surface as a proxy for a computer screen. Any movements of the mouse over the surface are then translated into movements on the screen. These days, a mouse also has a number of buttons, and often scroll wheel, that allow interaction with on-screen objects.

The mouse is a hugely useful device but it is also a two-dimensional one. But what of the three-dimensional world and the long-standing, but growing, promise of virtual reality. What kind of device will take the place of the mouse when we begin to interact in three-dimensions?

Today, we get to see one idea developed at the University of Wyoming in Laramie by Anh Nguyen and Amy Banic. These guys have created an intelligent thimble that can sense its position accurately in three-dimensions and respond to a set of preprogrammed gestures that allow the user to interact with objects in a virtual three-dimensional world..."

Link to Original Source
Mars

ESA Shows Off Quadcopter Landing Concept For Mars Rovers 104

Posted by samzenpus
from the drop-that-anywhere dept.
coondoggie writes Taking a page from NASA's rocket powered landing craft from its most recent Mars landing mission, the European Space Agency is showing off a quadcopter that the organization says can steer itself to smoothly lower a rover onto a safe patch of the rocky Martian surface. The ESA said its dropship, known as the StarTiger's Dropter is indeed a customized quadcopter drone that uses a GPS, camera and inertial systems to fly into position, where it then switches to vision-based navigation supplemented by a laser range-finder and barometer to lower and land a rover autonomously.
Google

Researchers Develop New Way To Steal Passwords Using Google Glass 116

Posted by samzenpus
from the let's-see-what-you-typed-there dept.
mpicpp writes with a story about researchers who have developed a way to steal passwords using video-capturing devices.Cyber forensics experts at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell have developed a way to steal passwords entered on a smartphone or tablet using video from Google's face-mounted gadget and other video-capturing devices. The thief can be nearly ten feet away and doesn't even need to be able to read the screen — meaning glare is not an antidote. The security researchers created software that maps the shadows from fingertips typing on a tablet or smartphone. Their algorithm then converts those touch points into the actual keys they were touching, enabling the researchers to crack the passcode. They tested the algorithm on passwords entered on an Apple iPad, Google's Nexus 7 tablet, and an iPhone 5.
Earth

Ancient Bird With Largest Wingspan Yet Discovered 54

Posted by samzenpus
from the we're-going-to-need-more-seed dept.
sciencehabit writes Fossils unearthed at a construction project in South Carolina belong to a bird with the largest wingspan ever known, according to a new study. The animal measured 6.4 meters from wingtip to wingtip, about the length of a 10-passenger limousine and approaching twice the size of the wandering albatross, today's wingspan record-holder. Like modern-day albatrosses, the newly described species would have been a soaring champ.
Transportation

Uber Is Now Cheaper Than a New York City Taxi 139

Posted by samzenpus
from the penny-pinching dept.
redletterdave writes Uber announced in a blog post on Monday it would cut the prices of its UberX service in New York City by 20% — but it's only for a limited time. Uber says this makes it cheaper to use UberX than taking a taxi. Consumers like Uber's aggressive pricing strategy but competitors — and some of its own drivers — are not as happy. UberX, Uber’s cheaper service usually hosted by regular people driving basic sedans rather than fancy black cars, also cut its rates by 25% last week in the Bay Area, including San Francisco, San Jose, and Oakland. As a result of that announcement, Uber said its service was effectively “45% cheaper than a taxi.”
Australia

Tractor Beam Created Using Water Waves 71

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-over-here dept.
KentuckyFC writes The idea that light waves can push a physical object is far from new. But a much more recent idea is that a laser beam can also pull objects like a tractor beam. Now a team of Australian physicists has used a similar idea to create a tractor beam with water waves that pulls floating objects rather than pushes them. Their technique is to use an elongated block vibrating on the surface of water to create a train of regular plane waves. When the amplitude of these waves is small, they gradually push the surface of the water along, creating a flow that pushes floating objects with it. However, when the amplitude increases, the waves become non-linear and begin to interact with each other in a complex way. This sets up a flow of water on the surface in the opposite direction to the movement of the waves. The result is that floating objects--ping pong balls in the experiment--are pulled towards the vibrating block, like a tractor beam.
Books

Book Review: Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboards 23

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
benrothke writes There is a not so fine line between data dashboards and other information displays that provide pretty but otherwise useless and unactionable information; and those that provide effective answers to key questions. Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboards is all about the later. In this extremely valuable book, authors Jay Jacobs and Bob Rudis show you how to find security patterns in your data logs and extract enough information from it to create effective information security countermeasures. By using data correctly and truly understanding what that data means, the authors show how you can achieve much greater levels of security. Keep reading for the rest of Ben's review.
Book Reviews

+ - Book review: Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboards

Submitted by benrothke
benrothke (2577567) writes "Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboards

Author: Jay Jacobs and Bob Rudis

Pages: 352

Publisher: Wiley

Rating: 10/10

Reviewer: Ben Rothke

ISBN: 978-1118793725

Summary: Superb book for effective use of data for information security





There is a not so fine line between data dashboards and other information displays that provide pretty but otherwise useless and unactionable information; and those that provide effective answers to key questions. Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboardsis all about the later.



In this extremely valuable book, authors Jay Jacobs and Bob Rudis show you how to find security patterns in your data logs and extract enough information from it to create effective information security countermeasures. By using data correctly and truly understanding what that data means, the authors show how you can achieve much greater levels of security.



The book is meant for a serious reader who is willing to put in the time and effort to learn the programming necessary (mainly in Python and R) to truly understand what information exists deep in the recesses of their logs. As to R, it is a GNU project and a free software programming language and software environment for statistical computing and graphics. The R language is widely used among statisticians and data miners for developing statistical software and data analysis. For analysis the level of which Jacobs and Rudis prescribe, R is a godsend.



The following are the 12 densely packed chapters in the book:



1 : The Journey to Data-Driven Security

2 : Building Your Analytics Toolbox: A Primer on Using R and Python for Security Analysis

3 : Learning the "Hello World" of Security Data Analysis

4 : Performing Exploratory Security Data Analysis

5 : From Maps to Regression

6 : Visualizing Security Data

7 : Learning from Security Breaches

8 : Breaking Up with Your Relational Database

9 : Demystifying Machine Learning

10 : Designing Effective Security Dashboards

11 : Building Interactive Security Visualizations

12 : Moving Toward Data-Driven Security





After completing the book, the reader will have the ability to know which questions to ask to gain security insights, and use that data to ensure the overall security of their data and networks. Getting to that level is not a trivial at all a trivial task; even if there are vendors who can promise to do that.





For many people performing data analysis, the dependable Excel spreadsheet is their basic choice for data manipulation. The book calls the spreadsheet a gateway tool between a text editor and programming. The book notes that spreadsheets work as long as the data is not too large or complex. The book quotes a 2013 report to shareholders from J.P. Morgan in which parts of their 2012 $6 billion in losses was due in part to problems with their Excel spreadsheets.





The authors suggest using Excel as a temporary solution for quick one-shot tasks. For those that have repeating analytical tasks or models that are used repeatedly, it's best to move to some type of structured programming language, specifically those that the book suggest and for provides significant amounts of code examples; all of which are available on the companion website here.





The goal of all data extraction is to use data analysis to answer real questions. A large part of the book focuses on how to ask the right question. In chapter 1, the authors write that every good data analysis project begins with setting a goal and creating one or more research questions. Without a well-formed question guiding the analysis, you may wasting time and energy seeking convenient answers in the data, or worse, you may end up answering a question that nobody was asking in the first place.





The value of the book is that it shows the reader how to focus on context and purpose of the data analysis by setting the research question appropriately; rather than simply parsing large amounts of data. It's ultimately irrelevant if you can use Hadoop to process petabytes of data if you don't know what you are looking for.





Visualization is a large part of what this book is about, and in chapter 6 — Visualizing Security Data, the book notes that the most efficient path to human understanding is via the visual sense. It goes on to details the many advantages data visualization has, and the key to making it work.





As important as visualization is, describing the data is equally important. In chapter 7, the book introduces the VERIS(Vocabulary for Event Recording and Incident Sharing) framework. VERIS is a set of metrics designed to provide a common language for describing security incidents in a structured and repeatable manner. VERIS helps organizations collect useful incident-related information and to share that information, anonymously and responsibly with others.





The book shows how you can use dashboards for effective data visualization. But the authors warn that a dashboard is notan art show. They caution that given the graphical nature of dashboards, it's easy to fall into the trap of making them look like pieces of modern or fringe art; when they are far more akin to architectural and industrial diagrams that require more controlled, deliberate and constrained design.





As to dashboards the authors do not like, they consider the Cyber Security Situational Awarenessto be glitzy but not informative. Personally, I thought the dashboard has a lot of good information.





The book uses the definition of dashboardaccording to Stephen Few, in that it's a "visual display of the most important information needed to achieve one or more objectives that has been consolidated in a single computer screen so it can be monitored at a glance". The book enables the reader to create dashboards like that.





Data-Driven Security: Analysis, Visualization and Dashboardsis a superb book written by two experts who provide significant amounts of valuable information in every chapter. For those that are willing to put the time and effort into the serious amount of work that the book requires, they will find it a vital resource that will certainly help them achieve much higher levels of security.







Reviewed by Ben Rothke"

"Those who will be able to conquer software will be able to conquer the world." -- Tadahiro Sekimoto, president, NEC Corp.

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