Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:What about recursion? (Score 1) 123

This reminds me of a friend of mine who used to flash his high beams erratically as he came up to red lights because he knew thats how the fire trucks signal to give them a green. I tried to tell him that there was no way this was going to work, but he was convinced it did because....of course.... fairly often he would flash his lights and the light would turn green for him....

I think your friend is influenced by this.

Comment: Re:Simple fix. (Score 1) 267

by ClickOnThis (#48006759) Attached to: 2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Why would they put Braille on the drive-up ATMs if they didn't expect me to drive there?

1. ATMs probably come standard with Braille. It's not worth it to create a special non-Braille version for the drive-ups.

2. Lots of people use drive-up ATMs without actually driving up to them. I know I have.

3. An AC poster already pointed out that blind people can take a taxi to the ATM.

Comment: Re:Another terrible article courtesy of samzenpus (Score 1) 383

by ClickOnThis (#47987567) Attached to: Seattle Passes Laws To Keep Residents From Wasting Food

When someone says "wasting food" It implies they mean actually wasting the food, as in not eating it all. Not that they are putting it in the incorrect bin, or recycling the food.

Corn can be used to create ethanol fuel. Is such corn "wasted" because it is not eaten?

Uneaten food that is diverted from landfill serves a purpose when it is rescued for composting, albeit one that was not intended when it was sold in the grocery store. Also, it reduces the use of valuable landfill space, thereby lowering the cost of trash disposal. So I would contend that it is not wasted (at least not entirely) when it is diverted from landfill.

Comment: Re: Huh? (Score 3, Insightful) 122

by ClickOnThis (#47934919) Attached to: Scientists Twist Radio Beams To Send Data At 32 Gigabits Per Second

The reference to 4G limits has exactly what to do with this story?

I suppose about as much as a Space Shuttle has to do with a person standing next to it. I took it as a scale-comparison, but I understand your point about the story creating a potentially false impression that this is an evolution of 4G.

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 1) 122

by ClickOnThis (#47934213) Attached to: Scientists Twist Radio Beams To Send Data At 32 Gigabits Per Second

transfer data at the speed of 32 gigabits per second, which is 30 times faster than 4G LTE wireless technology in use today.

Exactly which carrier offers gigabit 4G LTE?

Some 4G implementations have a theoretical upper limit of 1 Gb/s for low-mobility agents.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4...

Comment: Re:Tesla's taking a cue from Apple (Score 1) 155

by ClickOnThis (#47915171) Attached to: Court: Car Dealers Can't Stop Tesla From Selling In Massachusetts

This is only partially true. You have to remember that Apple products used to suck. People did not want them.

In my modest experience with older Apple products, I have found that they were about the same as others in quality. They didn't "suck" any more or less than their competitors.

Comment: Re:Throwback (Score 3, Interesting) 155

by ClickOnThis (#47915025) Attached to: Court: Car Dealers Can't Stop Tesla From Selling In Massachusetts

a throwback to the days when Detroit tried to undercut its franchise dealers by opening company-owned shops.

This seems to indicate that the same laws were good then & not good now. How?

Back then, Detroit was trying to pressure their own retailers to sell their cars at a lower markup. The law was Good (TM) for the retailers because it protected them from their suppliers. There were plenty of retailers to drive prices down through competition; they didn't need the suppliers to compete in the retail market.

Now, Tesla doesn't distribute to independent retailers, and they want to keep it that way, because they're not keen on having their products in the same showrooms as retailers showing other products. As far as they're concerned, Tesla is revolutionary, and would look queer and out-of-place amongst other vehicles with internal combustion engines.

Tesla doesn't trust retailers to present their product fairly in this context. And I can see their point: if their only contact with the consumer is the conventional auto retailer, you can bet all the other car manufacturers would freak out at having to share the showroom with Tesla, and would put pressure on the retailers to sing their own song.

In short, Tesla doesn't think the market will be fair to them unless they sell their product through their own stores. And since the retailers aren't selling their product, they're not competing with them, and so the law is an anachronism in this context.

Comment: Re:Here in Massachusetts (Score 1) 155

by ClickOnThis (#47914133) Attached to: Court: Car Dealers Can't Stop Tesla From Selling In Massachusetts

I think part of that is also from a "morality hurdle" mentality. Many religious people don't want the alcohol market to be efficient in order to squelch consumption. It may not merely be old-fashioned protectionism of mom-and-pop stores.

I can imagine that explanation being plausible in a Jesus-belt state, but not Massachusetts.

Comment: Re:Why should it NOT exist? (Score 1) 120

by ClickOnThis (#47898439) Attached to: The Challenges and Threats of Automated Lip Reading

Heck, even certain knowledge is illegal for the general public to own, let alone internalize, like plans to make nuclear bombs.

Designs for nuclear weapons are not too hard to find online. The hard part (thank God) is obtaining the materials to make one, such as enriched uranium, plutonium, deuterium and tritium.

That said, I agree it would be illegal for a member of the general public to possess classified documents of any kind, without authorization.

Comment: Re: This technology *will* exist... (Score 2) 120

by ClickOnThis (#47897363) Attached to: The Challenges and Threats of Automated Lip Reading

There's lots of cameras deployed without microphones. Also pretty sure sound doesn't make it to geosynchronous orbit strata of the atmosphere...

You're implying we could read lips from GEO. Good luck with that. Even if the Hubble Space Telescope (which is at low earth orbit, not geosynchronous) were pointed at the earth, the best resolution you could manage would be about 30 cm.

http://www.spacetelescope.org/...
https://what-if.xkcd.com/32/

In theory it might be possible to read lips at GEO, but you'd need a HUGE telescope, or smaller binocular-configured telescopes with a wide-enough baseline, to get the job done.

And nitpick: there's really no "strata of the atmosphere" at GEO. Contributions there from the Earth's atmosphere are miniscule. It's pretty much plasma and magnetosphere from a few hundred km altitude on upwards.

Comment: Re:Too bad (Score 1) 120

by ClickOnThis (#47897167) Attached to: The Challenges and Threats of Automated Lip Reading

In the end, I suspect we'll decide that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages, and pass laws to protect people from the disadvantages. I'm not saying this will be ideal, but it will be the best we can do.

We have faced, or are facing the same issue with other technologies such as face recognition, profiling, genome sequencing, etc.

Nothing succeeds like success. -- Alexandre Dumas

Working...