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Comment: Re:No it didn't (Score 1) 121

by Clandestine_Blaze (#36990696) Attached to: DOS, Backdoor, and Easter Egg Found In Siemens S7

This is a great find! And it really makes sense, especially since the political leadership in Iran is currently fractured. There's a huge power struggle between Ahmadinejad and Khameni, and in one of the Persian language newspapers that I was reading the other day, it said that they were even arguing over things such as women covering their hair. Ahmadinejad wants to relax the laws to allow women to show more hair, and Khameni and his backers wanted punishment for women who showed more hair.

Anyway, my story was a bit off-topic, but I think you bring up a great point that there hasn't been an "okay guys, we're going for the bomb" type decision because of the leaders butting heads.

Comment: Re:No it didn't (Score 1) 121

by Clandestine_Blaze (#36989856) Attached to: DOS, Backdoor, and Easter Egg Found In Siemens S7

There was a pretty good op-ed yesterday in the Washington Post that talked about this. Shortly after the revolution, most of the scientific institutions in Iran were either shut down or held back during the 1980s, but then started to make a resurgence in the 1990s, which is why it is taking so long for Iran to get anywhere.

Anyway, the whole op-ed focuses on Iran being one of the few countries to not have much external help in their nuclear program. Now, this is just an opinion piece, so I'm not claiming it as being a source of ultimate truth, but I felt the author raised some interesting points.

That does not invalidate your point, however, and you are right, it's still taking Iran decades, and every year we hear that they are "2-3 years" away from the bomb without seeing much success. I personally don't believe that Iran would be crazy enough to use a nuclear bomb, and think that they want to join in on the nuclear club as protection. The current Iranian leadership is power-hungry and greedy, and will do anything to stay in power. That doesn't mean that I would be thrilled that they would have it, since it'll do nothing but create more turmoil in that region.

Comment: Re:Gee thanks Mossad (Score 1) 121

by Clandestine_Blaze (#36988546) Attached to: DOS, Backdoor, and Easter Egg Found In Siemens S7

The tradeoff was that Iran learned very quickly how to recover from such a set-back, was able to become operational and self-sufficient very quickly, and has now implemented additional security mechanisms in their operations to try to avoid something like this in the future. This only made them stronger and more self-reliant. Whoops.

Having said that, I still despise the Iranian leadership.

Comment: Re:...liabilities (Score 1) 431

by Clandestine_Blaze (#35709172) Attached to: StunRay Incapacitates With a Flash of Light

Makes sense to me - you won't get tasered or shot if you abide by the law.

Can I live in this black & white world that you live in, where every person beaten, tasered, or shot is a hardcore criminal that deserved it? I understand that you're biased, as your daughter and son-in-law are both police officers, but there are many documented cases out there of police using tasers against people when it is absolutely unnecessary and even more dangerous.

The problem is that police officers are now using tasers beyond situations when their lives are in danger. They are using it to shock people into compliance for not following verbal orders. They're using it in cases when they would never even think about using their gun. If your daughter and her husband are two of the few police officers using tasers ONLY when the situation calls for it, then I am happy that they volunteered to be police officers. The force needs more people like them.

But there is a reason why the Federal Court in California limits police use of Tasers.

Comment: Re:avoiding paradox? (Score 1) 332

by Clandestine_Blaze (#35517374) Attached to: Large Hadron Collider is a Time Machine?

I wonder if quantum entanglement could allow for information to be exchanged between branches. Or is that like setting a local variable in one block, and trying to reference it when it's out of scope? Interesting to think about. I would think that the possibility existing of pasts being altered means that it has already happened. How strange would that be, if our direct memories are continuously being altered.

Comment: Re:Download Your Profile (Score 1) 368

by Clandestine_Blaze (#35375986) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Facebook Archiving?

Well put.

I'd like to also point out that even if there was such a thing as karma applying to your next life, what good would it do? If you have no idea why you're being punished, it doesn't actually make things just or right. In fact, the person with the bad luck would gain sympathy as other observers would see that they're having a lot of bad things happen to them for what appears to be no reason.

Comment: Re:serious for a moment (Score 1) 334

by Clandestine_Blaze (#35218200) Attached to: On Retirement, Israeli General Takes Credit for Stuxnet Attacks

And apparently, all for nothing.

In an underground chamber near the Iranian city of Natanz, a network of surveillance cameras offers the outside world a rare glimpse into Iran's largest nuclear facility. The cameras were installed by U.N. inspectors to keep tabs on Iran's nuclear progress, but last year they recorded something unexpected: workers hauling away crate after crate of broken equipment.

In a six-month period between late 2009 and last spring, U.N. officials watched in amazement as Iran dismantled more than 10 percent of the Natanz plant's 9,000 centrifuge machines used to enrich uranium. Then, just as remarkably, hundreds of new machines arrived at the plant to replace the ones that were lost.

Despite the disgusting assassination of scientists and cyberwarfare, Iran's still in business. If nothing else, it taught Iran how to cope with losing intelligence and resources.

Comment: Re:Joke Time (Score 1) 640

by Clandestine_Blaze (#34989530) Attached to: Terrorists Bomb Moscow Airport

Fine... The let's talk about "God told me to invade Iraq" George W. Bush, who made-up reasons to invade a country and kill 100,000 civilians. And he did it in the name of America, God, and Haliburton. He's the biggest mass-murderer in recent history and he claims that God himself told him to invade -- making it an invasion in the name Christianity.

God told me to write this post.
However, that doesn't make this a Christian post, nor does it make the content of this post the responsibility/fault of Christianity.

See how that works?

Allah told me to blow myself up at a bus stop.
However, that doesn't make me Muslim, nor does it make my actions the responsibility / fault of all Muslims globally.

Yes, I do see how that works. Your point is, we shouldn't take the actions of a minority and demonize a larger population with it. Or do we have an exception for one religion but not the other?

Comment: Re:Yes, PLEASE ban cars! (Score 1) 546

by Clandestine_Blaze (#34971402) Attached to: Laser Incidents With Aircraft On the Rise

Many of the big problems I hear about in Europe seem to involve their Muslim immigrants, especially in France as another poster noted here.

Why Europe ever let middle-eastern Muslims come in, I have no idea. It should have been obvious that they would never assimilate, and that is exactly what causes racial conflicts. They need to all be sent back to their home countries. Both the USA and many European countries are having a lot of problems as a result of poor immigration policies.

So after a long history of French colonization and military control, the Muslim immigrants need to be sent home? If you don't want an immigration problem, don't colonize West African countries and expect the inhabitants to stay put where they are. It's not as if they all decided to pack their bags one day and move to France for their freedoms.

"Life, loathe it or ignore it, you can't like it." -- Marvin the paranoid android

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