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Comment: Frio Cooling Wallet/Pouch (Score 1) 165

by Clancie (#41197737) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Keeping Personal Tech Cool In Extreme Heat?
When I'm traveling, camping, rafting, etc. I need to bring a supply of insulin pens and keep them cool. I've been using Frio Cooling Wallets for years and they do a good job of keeping my insulin within the acceptable temperature range, even under less than ideal circumstances. They are basically an inner pouch with a gel quilted into it and an outer pouch. You soak the inner pouch in water and evaporation keeps the pouches contents cool. The cooling effect lasts for days and you can reuse them over and over. Since you don't want to stick a MP3 player in a damp pouch you'd want to put your gear in a plastic bag first. You might have to get creative with something as large as a tablet though since the largest wallet is about 8.5"x6.5" but they also make other items with the same cooling gel but wrap around your head and wrists so there are options if you use your imagination... http://www.amazon.com/FRIO-Insulin-Cooling-Wallet-Extra/dp/B0002262IA/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1346475461&sr=8-6&keywords=frio

+ - MozyHome Eliminates Unlimited Plan->

Submitted by Clancie
Clancie (678344) writes "For the first time since 2006, we’re adjusting the price of our MozyHome service. As part of this change, we’re replacing our Unlimited backup plan. The backup market has changed since we introduced MozyHome Unlimited in 2006, and our new plans are designed to help us continue serving the data protection needs of our customers.

Under the new plans, the vast majority of our MozyHome customers will pay just $1 more per month to continue protecting their files with Mozy. In many cases, customers who want to back up three or more computers will find their backup plans more affordable. However, customers who require very large volumes of storage for their backups will see their monthly cost increase accordingly. This change in pricing is driven by some very real changes to the backup market that have transpired since we introduced MozyHome Unlimited in 2006."

Link to Original Source
Input Devices

Is the Line-in Jack On the Verge of Extinction? 411

Posted by timothy
from the erasing-the-analog-hole dept.
SlashD0tter writes "Many older sound cards were shipped with line-out, microphone-in, and a line-in jacks. For years I've used such a line-in jack on an old Windows 2000 dinosaur desktop that I bought in 2000 (600 Mhz PIII) to capture the stereo audio signal from an old Technics receiver. I've used this arrangement to recover the audio from a slew of old vinyl LPs and even a few cassettes using some simple audio manipulating software from a small shop in Australia. I've noticed only recently, unfortunately, that all of the four laptops I've bought since then have omitted a line-in jack, forcing me to continue keeping this old desktop on life support. I've looked around for USB sound cards that include a line-in jack, but I haven't been too impressed by the selection. Is the line-in jack doomed to extinction, possibly due to lobbying from vested interests, or are there better thinking-outside-the-box alternatives available?"
Image

Pakistan Used Google Earth For Military Targeting 111

Posted by samzenpus
from the bejewel-funded dept.
NeoBeans writes "According to this article in the New York Times about the recent 'improvements' in military strikes by the Pakistani military it is revealed that they have dropped Google Earth as part of their target planning for a more precise technology. From the article, '... the air force has shifted from using Google Earth to more sophisticated images from spy planes and other surveillance aircraft, and has increased its use of laser-guided bombs. And no, you can't really find Osama Bin Laden using Google Maps either."

Building a 10 TB Array For Around $1,000 227

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the fun-projects dept.
As storage hardware costs continue to plummet, the folks over at Tom's Hardware have decided to throw together their version of the "Über RAID Array." While the array still doesn't stack up against SSDs for access time, a large array is capable of higher throughput via striping. Unfortunately, the amount of work required to assemble a setup like this seems to make it too much trouble for anything but a fun experiment. "Most people probably don't want to install more than a few hard drives into their PC, as it requires a massive case with sufficient ventilation as well as a solid power supply. We don't consider this project to be something enthusiasts should necessarily reproduce. Instead, we set out to analyze what level of storage performance you'd get if you were to spend the same money as on an enthusiast processor, such as a $1,000 Core i7-975 Extreme. For the same cost, you could assemble 12 1 TB Samsung Spinpoint F1 hard drives. Of course, you still need a suitable multi-port controller, which is why we selected Areca's ARC-1680iX-20."

Comment: Stealth Libretto (Score 1) 143

by Clancie (#27907185) Attached to: A Look Back At the World's First Netbook
Back when these came out I bought a pair of Libretto 110CTs for the company I worked for. I ended up taking one of them and installing Red Hat 6 on it and set it up to find rogue wireless access points in the companies many locations around the US. Since I was already traveling to many of these locations to do security audits, I just added wireless scanning to the list. To make things more interesting, I gutted a Franklin-Covey planner book and through skilled application of sticky-backed Velcro, I installed the Libretto into the planner book. While I was meeting with the local IT and/or security people I would have my planner book sitting on the conference table searching for wireless signals. At the end of the meeting I would check the Libretto and ask them about their wireless networks. More often than not they would deny the existence of any wireless devices (they were 100% forbidden by policy at that time), I would show them the stealth Libretto showing the average of 1-3 wireless APs with such incriminating names such as, "*companyname*-AP" or "*companyname*-lab". I was able to rescue both of those Librettos from the dumpster when their time was up. I still have them both today and they both run perfectly. Here is my stealth Libretto
PC Games (Games)

Map Editor, Photoshop Tool Coming To Braid 44

Posted by Soulskill
from the all-things-in-time dept.
Erik J writes "Braid creator Jonathon Blow has revealed that a map editor and image tool will be added to the popular puzzle game. First, though, Braid will receive a patch to fix some issues players have reported. Blow explains: 'After I get a new version out in a few days that fixes the problems some people are having, and when more people have played/finished the game, I am going to post some documentation for the editor. The way it works is you can make levels with the editor (up to a full game, potentially) and run that with -universe later... also a tool will be released that lets you take Photoshop files and import them into the game, if you want to put new graphics in your levels.' It is unclear if these capabilities are coming only to PC or to the Xbox 360 version as well."

The universe is all a spin-off of the Big Bang.

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