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Comment: Re:That guy just wasted his time (Score 2) 314

by volkerdi (#47854461) Attached to: GSOC Project Works To Emulate Systemd For OpenBSD

By what strange theory does Slackware support systemd? And how is the conversation being "held back"? At least on LQ, I think it's been discussed to death to the point where there's really nothing new to say about it.

I can say one thing for certain: you do not know that anything concerning systemd in Slackware is likely or not. Hell, *I* don't.

Comment: Re:Sub Reddits that still aren't banned... (Score 1) 307

"In a Reddit thread under the title “Every Man Is Responsible For His Own Soul” [sic], Mr Wong wrote: “I did not say ‘we won’t ban any subreddits ever’. I said that we don’t ban subreddits for being morally bad."

Mr. Wong, with all due respect (that's not much for the record). Horse. Fucking. Shit.

  If you make a rule against X (and ban X-related subreddits) but not rules against Y and Z, you're making a moral statement that Y and Z are more acceptable than X. There's just no other coherent reading of those rules. If you're trying to make a community where bestiality and racism are considered morally better than leaked celebrity nudes, that's fine - it's your site, but have the spine to fucking own it.

The Military

Could Tech Have Stopped ISIS From Using Our Own Heavy Weapons Against Us? 448

Posted by Soulskill
from the smart-phones-are-way-smarter-than-smart-bombs dept.
JonZittrain writes: This summer, ISIS insurgents captured Mosul — with with it, three divisions' worth of advanced American military hardware. After ISIS used it to capture the Mosul Dam, the U.S. started bombing its own pirated equipment. Could sophisticated military tanks and anti-aircraft missiles given or sold to countries like Iraq be equipped with a way to disable them if they're compromised, without opening them up to hacking by an enemy?

We already require extra authentication at a distance to arm nuclear weapons, and last season's 24 notwithstanding, we routinely operate military drones at a distance. Reportedly in the Falkland Islands war, Margaret Thatcher was able to extract codes to disable Argentina's Exocet missiles from the French. The simplest implementation might be like the proposal for land mines that expire after a certain time. Perhaps tanks — currently usable without even an ignition key — could require a renewal code digitally signed by the owning country to be entered manually or received by satellite every six months or so.

I'm a skeptic of kill switches, especially in consumer devices, but still found myself writing up the case for a way to disable military hardware in the field. There are lots of reasons it might not work — or work too well — but is there a way to improve on what we face now?

Comment: It's FUD? (Score 1) 132

Disclosing the existence of a vulnerability destroys a lot of its value, too. People who can stop using Tails until the issue is sorted out will do so, shutting off whatever intelligence could be gathered from them. If these guys had a real-world exploitable vulnerability and a willingness to sell it to the NSA, they would have sold it and said nothing.

Comment: Re:pure rubbish (Score 1) 394

by Cid Highwind (#47253937) Attached to: Cable Boxes Are the 2nd Biggest Energy Users In Many Homes

"normal draw is less than 140 watts, put it in standby and get 15 watts"

That's less than 500, but still an order of magnitude more than a set top box should need! IIRC power supply ratings on Apple TV and Roku box are both under 10 watts, real usage is probably 3-5. Add a WD green or similar hard drive (6-8W) and a couple of tuners and encoding ASICS and it still shouldn't break 20 watts at full load.

Comment: Re:What a joke.. (Score 2) 186

by Cid Highwind (#47240447) Attached to: The Nightmare On Connected Home Street

One device to compromise. If malware infects the LAN-of-things gateway, it can tell your pillows to play deadmau5, tell the lights to flash, and tell the security system to upload shower-cam photos to facebook.

(But then, computer viruses that just annoy the user with sounds and flashing text are deader than dial-up. Connected home malware would probably wait silently for bad weather, then lock you out and demand 0.25 bitcoin to let you back inside, or steal your amazon credentials when the refrigerator orders more milk, or turn on everyone's air conditioner at the same instant to DDoS the power grid.)

Comment: Correlation does not imply causation (Score 2, Insightful) 211

by volkerdi (#47143343) Attached to: Study Finds Porn Exposure Associated With Smaller Brain Region

More pseudoscience. They say that they're not sure whether this means that porn shrinks your brain, or if the shrunken brain causes porn viewing. But, this leaves out the very real possibility that this correlation means nothing whatsoever. The site below collects correlations that look pretty convincing in the graphs, but quite obviously are unlikely to be cases of causation in either direction:

http://www.tylervigen.com/

The bomb will never go off. I speak as an expert in explosives. -- Admiral William Leahy, U.S. Atomic Bomb Project

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